Beiträge

The secret L&D manager: What makes training effective?

This month’s secret training manager is Italian and has worked in a variety of fields including public research organizations and service companies. Here she talks with Scott Levey about the basic elements that make training and trainers effective.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

What makes training effective?

To me an effective training is a training that uses most of the senses. Meaning: seeing, hearing, touching. The learners need to experience things and be actively engaged. Of course, the training needs to cover the thinking side, but adult learners need to learn by doing things. A good training event also has to be designed to have different activities and moments. For example, it needs moments to listen and get input and ideas, moments to pause and ponder on the theory that was just presented to you, moments to experiment, and moments to recap. I want the trainer to also plan in multiple moments where they cover again the main and salient points of the training.  For me this is essential.  I would also say that effective training sessions need to have a certain pace and this pace changes depending on the moment.  After lunch the trainer will increase the pace to get people moving again. Alternatively, the pace may slow down if the trainer sees that the participants aren’t following what the trainer is trying to do or trying to say.  So that’s what I think makes an effective training.

What makes the trainer effective? I mean you yourself have worked with many trainers and you have also trained yourself, haven’t you?

Well the most obvious answer would be that the trainer is the subject matter expert. She is an expert in her field and has real experience … but that isn’t enough. I’m going to give you a trivial example but I think everyone can relate to it. It’s about my daughter. She’s in high school right now and her math teacher is brilliant. He has a very brilliant mind … but he is not a pedagogue, so he is a teacher by definition but he is not a teacher through experience, and he is not patient with them. He knows his stuff, and is really smart, but he doesn’t know how to convey the salient points to my daughter or his class.  When I think back to the many companies I have worked in, I have also seen similar experiences with internal training sessions ran in various topics. It could be IT related, quality management, HR or technical skills.  Being a subject matter expert is the start but not the end.

Being an expert is not enough; you also need to be an expert in pedagogy, you need to be patient and you need to be attentive to the participants and allow them to ask questions. You need also to be able to shut down any conversation that strays from the topic because it can become difficult and you can waste time and not reach your training goals. This is not good because as we know training has an agenda and you need to stay on track.

Somehow a trainer also needs to be very confident and have some leadership behaviors, because she’s the leader of the group for the time of the training. Finally, I think an effective trainer has to have those storytelling skills where you put theory and experience into a nice little story that illustrates the point. And is easy to understand and remember

So, what I’m saying is an effective trainer is somebody who

  1. Is a subject matter expert
  2. Is a good communicator
  3. Is people-oriented
  4. Can lead a group
  5. Has the skills needed to design training so there are the right moments at the right times
  6. Has the skills to deliver the training in an engaging way and manage the pace
  7. Is focused and reaches the objective set for the training

Train-the-trainer courses can really help for both new and confident trainers … but it is my opinion that nothing really beats experience. So that’s what I think makes a trainer a good trainer.


Who is the secret L&D manager?

The “secret L&D manager” is actually a group of L&D managers. They are real people who would prefer not to mention their name or company – but do want to write anonymously so they can openly and directly share their ideas and experience with their peers.

You can meet more of our secret L&D managers here …

 

Organizing management and leadership training programs – the secret L&D manager

This month’s Secret L&D manager is German, based in Germany and works for a global automotive supply company.  He/She has worked in training and development for over 7 years.

New Call-to-actionWhat is important to you when designing and rolling out a leadership program?

For me a successful leadership or senior manager program in our company can never be a “one size fits all” solution.  Leadership and people management is not like a manual. We don’t want a “that’s how you have to do it” approach and we are serious about offering an individualized approach. The programs we build with companies like Target give people a chance to identify whatever they need and benefit from support in applying this in their day-to-day tasks – or in their life as a whole. Individuals take different things from the program.

Who do you target when you set up management and leadership programs?

When I set up a leadership program we are typically involving managers and leaders from a broad range of different functions – from HR to finance, logistics to manufacturing etc.  This means I have to exclude functional topics from the training design because they won’t be relevant to the whole group.

What kind or development areas are you targeting when you set up management and leadership programs?

We’re working in a very fast-paced environment and there are always a lot of changes going on.  A lot of our managers and leaders are firefighting, and really involved in operational work. We want to focus on soft skills like strategic thinking, so that they can step out of the operational and build a broader view of everything.

It is really important for me that our managers have the chance to step back and have a look at the broader picture – this means looking especially at strategy and finance. The leadership program needs to tackle what finance means for our company and to ensure the leaders have a big picture of company decisions that are made based on our financial performance. This extends to them having a broader view on strategy.  Our programs support them in building a strategic view of the company, their area and their immediate objectives.

We also want them to develop a stronger understanding of the consequences their own behaviours have, for example, on an individual, team or another department. If they are stressed out and don’t recognise that somebody in their team is drifting away, that’s not good.  The programs develop them to focus on their people –  their team is what makes their life easier in the end. They need to see not only themselves, their own workload, their own fires that are burning but also to focus more on their people and our overall strategy and values.

Do to summarize, strategy, finance, self-awareness, leading teams, and managing and developing the people they are leading. We want them to just take a step back and have a look at this and to have also the chance to experiment with tools, models and ideas. Not every tool is suitable for every person so they should decide on their own what they want to apply in the day to day what’s useful for them.

What is important to you when designing the training interventions which make up such a program?

I want them to work in groups and have personal time with the trainer. We have a mixture of formats including 1-to-1 intakes, using a tool such as DISC or MBTI, face-to-face seminars, virtual workshops and individual coaching. As the participants in the program are coming from all over Europe we also look to reduce travel costs and time using webinars, e-learning, virtual training sessions. The intakes, accountability calls and transfer coaching are all normally done via phone calls or using Webex. Then there are 3 to 4 onsite events with the groups coming together and meeting each other. These could be at the headquarters, a nice seminar hotel or near a plant (so we can organize a plant visit). Cost- and time- wise it is just not possible that they are travelling every few weeks.

What are you looking for from the trainers?

The trainers, of course are a very important element. When we look for trainers it is important to us that they are flexible. Our audience is usually, during the day, under pressure and there can be last minute things coming up so they are not able to attend a the whole session or training. So we need the trainer to be timewise as flexible as possible so if somebody missed some content they don’t get lost in the program. The trainer needs to help them and give an insight into what has been done. They need to be supportive with the people through the whole process – that is really important. Then of course that they have to be able to handle different personalities, functions, nationalities and cultures.

You mentioned culture – what role does this play in delivering the training?

This is a huge challenge, I can tell you. It depends a little bit on which positions the people are coming from. If they are coming from central positions and travelling a lot, meeting a lot of people etc. then usually they are open to everything and it’s easier to work with them. People coming from the production sites somewhere far away in the middle of nowhere – then it’s sometimes hard for them to connect with the other leaders and the softer stuff. It’s also hard for the trainers to manage them in the right way because they are really stuck in their culture. They are not as open as the people who are already used to being in this international environment – but it’s really important to get them to the stage where they are more open to the other cultures and diverse people.

How do your managers and leader react to the programs you offer? And how do you assess the training ?

The reaction of the operational leaders to this approach is very very positive. There are people who are more willing to open up and to work on themselves than others but I must say that those people who opened up completely are the ones that benefited the most from the program in the end.

About assessment, after the training I usually do a post training assessment where it’s a questionnaire where I ask people different sort of questions.


Who is the Secret L&D manager?

The Secret L&D manager is actually many L&D managers.  They are real people who would prefer not to mention their name or company – but do want to write anonymously so they can openly and directly share their ideas and experience with peers.

Implementing the 70-20-10 model- insights from a secret L&D manager

This month’s Secret L&D manager is German, based in Germany and works for a global automotive supply company. She has worked in training and development for over 7 years.

Why are you using 70-20-10?

We introduced the 70-20-10 model in 2016, mainly because too many people were thinking that “development” is just about training, and that if our company wasn’t providing “training” the company wasn’t developing people. The 70-20-10 model helped us show that learning and development is more than just training. Training is one tool, but you can develop yourself all the time. The 70-20-10 model is rolled out globally to our whole organisation. There are also individual initiatives that I have developed which are only rolled out in a specific business area in Europe and for specific development programs like our talent development program.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

How did people react?

I would say the majority of the people in our company did not really understand at first. Only those people who joined the sessions where we explained and showed what 70-20-10 is really about – they understood the sense behind it. Learning and development is not such a big topic in our company and is not the highest priority, so many people read about it and ignored it.

So how have you brought 70-20-10 to life in the organization?

I created an individual development plan, built around 70-20-10, specifically for participants in our training programmes.

Which kind of programmes?

A development programme for our most talented young professionals. First of all, I introduced the 70-20-10 model a little bit to them, and I explained what 70-20-10 is about – and what it is not about too. Mainly that 70% of everything they learn is learning by doing, 20% is learning from others and only 10% is learning by “training”. I must say people were quite surprised about this when I started talking to them about it, but they quickly related to it.  They saw it reflected how they had learned their technical skills, and also their softer skills.

I then introduced a new individual development plan, which I have here in front of me.  I structured it in different levels. First of all, people were asked to define an overall individual development goal. Strictly speaking they weren’t all SMART goals – some were closer to a vision for where do I want to be and by when. As most of the goals were very general, I asked them to explain a little bit about what they meant with this goal. Where they are now, where they want to be and what they think would change when they achieve this goal. These were the key questions we asked them to think about.

Then they had to define three key development areas that they need to work on in order to achieve that very goal. These areas had to be really, really specific. They have to be SMART.

Once they had defined key development areas, they had to define development actions. On the tool I gave them, these actions are actually structured using 70-20-10.  They need to define mostly “learning by doing” actions, then partly “learning through others” actions and the smallest part is the “learning in training” actions.

And then, last but not least, for the individual development areas they were asked to define key performance indicators where they can measure the success of their development. Using KPIs is very characteristic for our automotive supply company because everything is measured in KPIs here. This is a step they understand easily, and I didn’t have to explain to them what a KPI is. Everything they do is measured.

How do you get a KPI from a soft skill?

Well, that’s tricky. Let’s take the simple example of improving presentation skills. So development actions can be “I will present my project four times in front of my boss or my team, and one of these will need to be delivered virtually”. The KPI could be the number of presentations you have done.

So you are just tracking that it’s happening?

Yes. Another example for management training is if you give or receive positive feedback – yes or no – it can be measured. It just helps a little bit, like you said, to track it, to know that they have to document their status. It really helps them to be motivated or to stay motivated.

Have you integrated the 70-20-10 into your senior management programs?

We have.  I think the 70 is really covered by the business simulations we use. In these simulations people lead their own company, competing against each other and most of it is really learning by doing. They have to work with the numbers, they have to work with the reports, they have to make their own decisions. They have the chance to contact their trainers for example, or their colleagues, and ask them for advice, so that’s learning by others maybe, but mostly it’s the learning by doing.

How do senior managers respond to being asked to build KPIs for their own development?

I must say I only really push the KPIs with the young professionals. They need the orientation to have this measured and their development areas are way simpler than the ones from the very experienced senior leaders that we’re training. I don’t push measuring of the senior managers and leaders. I think at their level they should be capable of measuring themselves and knowing how far they have come with their development.

What advice would you give to another training manager who wants to try and introduce this 70-20-10 approach to their organisation?

Firstly, I would say it’s a very rational approach to learning and development. You have to look a little bit at your target training audience and at your people. I mean in our automotive world there are a lot of engineers, and a lot of very structured thinking. They need tools that fit into their rational world and I think 70-20-10 does this for them. Learning is quite abstract and 70-20-10 gives them a framework to put it into numbers. So if you would like to apply this in your company you should really look at what is your target group.

And I see that structure is reflected in the way you have built your tools. I mean you’ve got boxes that need filling in which fits with your target audience, tick boxes, % etc.

Exactly, I’ve got KPIs. As I mentioned, everything is measured here and that’s their way of working. It is what people are used to and comfortable with. I think if you are trying to implement this in a more “creative” or “service”  company you might see much more pushback to the way my tools are designed and the use of KPIs

Thanks for your time and for sharing!

You’re welcome!


Who is the Secret L&D manager?

The Secret L&D manager is actually many L&D managers.  They are real people who would prefer not to mention their name or company – but do want to write anonymously so they can openly and directly share their ideas and experience with peers.

Business English training: on-the-job training (for the job)

On-the-job (OTJ) training has been a cornerstone in our approach to in-house Business English training since our first InCorporate Trainers started their jobs (one of them was Scott Levey). When we explain the concept of on-the-job training to potential clients, they “understand” what we’re saying … BUT …they don’t really “get” how effective and beneficial on-the-job training is until they have seen it in action. This post aims to explain what it is, how it works, and how participants benefit, using some non-specific examples of on-the-job training.

New Call-to-action

The benefits of on-the-job training

OTJ training is highly effective because the training takes place alongside and as part of your daily work. The trainer uses your work situations (your emails, your virtual meetings, your plant tours) as the basis for your learning. On-the-job training takes place at work, while you are working. This brings two huge benefits.

  1. You maximize your time because you are benefiting from training while you are working.
  2. You can directly transfer what you learn to your job. Your training is completely based on a real and concrete task. Everything you learn is relevant.

If you are familiar with the 70-20-10 model, you’ll know that 70% of learning comes through “doing” and from “experience”. Learning while you work is highly effective and this is the heart of on-the-job training.

“I helped Hans to de-escalate a situation in Supply Chain Management. Hans felt that the American party was wound-up and overly difficult. Hans brainstormed phrases with my help and he wrote a draft email. I helped him improve the structure and tone of the email and suggested he rewrote some of his sentences in plain English. A few hours later, the American party positively replied and the whole thing was solved by the time Hans went home.”

What exactly is on-the-job training and how does it work?

With on-the-job training, the trainer is there when you need assistance in preparing emails, specifications, manuals, reports, slides and other documentation. The trainer can support you in the planning, writing and reviewing stage. The trainer is also available to you for preparing meetings, phone calls, web meetings, teleconferences, presentations and negotiations.  They can then shadow you in action and provide personalized and situationally-based feedback.

On-the-job training focuses on your priorities at work and on you improving your business English in those areas. It can be

  • reactive where you ask the trainer for help “Can you help me improve these slides?”
  • proactive where the trainer encourages you to share work you have done/are doing in English “I heard you are involved in writing the R-Spec for the new project. How can I support you?”

“One of my participants, a product manager, had to deliver two presentations in English. It was basically the same presentation, but for two different audiences.  Observing her in our first practice session, I made a note of language points to work on. We worked on these, and a few other things (key messages, adapting messages to different audiences, Q&A session) over the next week. She delivered the presentations to me again, already with much more confidence and fluency – and then she practised with a few colleagues in a weekly group session and benefitted from both their positive feedback and the confidence boost.  Finally, I watched her deliver from the back and she did great.  After the presentations we debriefed and I shared my feedback (what went really well, what would she like to focus more on next time etc) . She was too critical of her performance and I helped her to be realistic about what she needs to focus on.”

What on-the-job training isn’t

What the trainer does not do is write the email/document for you (where’s the learning in that?). One common misconception is that on-the-job trainers are translators or proof readers. They’re not, in the same way that translators and proof readers aren’t trainers. Collaborative proof reading and translation can be an option, but the ownership needs to stay with the learner.

Another misconception is that on-the-job training is traditional “classroom training” during work time. The trainer will certainly use the “insider” view and what they have seen on-the-job to tailor traditional “off the job” training. This means your group training, coaching, 1-1 training, and seminars are closer to your workplace and that the transfer of learning is smoother.  But “on the job” training is learning while actually doing. There’s a good example of how this looks in action in an R&D department here.

“Three of my participants had written a 300-page instruction manual and they came to me with the request to help them improve it. Nobody in their department understood it enough to successfully use the system that it was meant to explain. I told them I would read it. Oh boy. We worked on writing with the reader in mind, structuring documents to make them scannable and writing in plain English. Visuals replaced paragraphs and we even created a few video tutorials too.  Four weeks later, they produced a second manual. Over one hundred pages lighter, it was clear, comprehensive, mistake free, and written in a style that everyone could understand, even me. As a result, the system that was supposed to make everyone’s job easier made everyone’s job easier.”

Bringing on-the-job training to life

We sign confidentiality agreements with our clients. Even when we don’t, we wouldn’t use their actual documentation online, so these examples are non-specific and Hans is not really called Hans … she’s called XXXX.

If you would like to know more about the benefits of this approach, don’t hesitate to contact us.

Der geheime Manager für Lernen & Entwicklung: Wonach suchen L&E-Manager in einem Trainingsangebot?

Der geheime Manager für Lernen & Entwicklung dieses Monats ist Australier mit Sitz in Deutschland und arbeitet für ein amerikanisches Unternehmen, das Bildverarbeitungssysteme und Software produziert.  Seit über 18 Jahren ist er in der Aus- und Weiterbildung tätig: als L&E-Manager, Inhouse-Trainer und als externer Trainingsanbieter.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providersWas erwarten Sie von einem Trainingsangebot?

In erster Linie möchte ich sehen, ob der Anbieter mir tatsächlich zugehört hat. Ich möchte Nachweise dafür sehen, dass sie aufgenommen haben, was ich gesagt habe, und dass sie meine Erwartungen klar verstanden haben. Was ich damit meine, ist, dass das Angebot meine Bedürfnisse und die Informationen widerspiegeln muss, die ich ihnen zu Beginn gegeben habe. Als nächstes möchte ich auch einen Mehrwert sehen. Ja, ich möchte sicher sein, dass sie mir zugehört haben, aber ich möchte auch, dass sie etwas mehr an den Tisch bringen. Ich schätze, ich erwarte von ihnen, dass sie mir zeigen, dass sie etwas von ihrem Fachwissen und ihrer Erfahrung teilen, indem sie mir eine neue Idee oder eine Lösung für ein Problem anbieten, an das ich nicht gedacht habe.

Um ehrlich zu sein, will oder brauche ich nicht wirklich ein super detailliertes Angebotsdokument. In der Tat, je mehr ich darüber nachdenke, desto unwahrscheinlicher ist es, dass ich von einem 50-seitigen ausführlichen Bericht beeindruckt bin. Seien wir ehrlich, wir sind alle sehr beschäftigt, also möchte ich ein Dokument sehen, in dem sie es in Teile zerlegen, so dass ich einen klaren Blick darauf werfen kann, was passieren wird und wie sie es erreichen werden. Oh und nicht zu vergessen, das erwartete Ergebnis am Ende des Trainings. Also das, was Menschen nach dem Training besser können sollten als vorher. Deshalb schicken wir sie schließlich auf eine Schulung.

Natürlich möchte ich ein klares Verständnis dafür, wie viel mich die Trainingslösung kosten wird. Ja, ich weiß, dass es nicht immer möglich ist, alle möglichen Kosten zu identifizieren, aber was ich nicht will, sind böse Überraschungen später im Prozess. So als ob man plötzlich herausfindet, dass man für ein Business Class Ticket bezahlt. Das wäre ein Problem.

Wenn es das erste Angebot eines neuen Anbieters ist, welche Extras benötigen Sie dann?

Die Dinge sind ein wenig anders, wenn es jemand ist, den man noch nicht kennt. Wenn es das erste Mal ist, möchte ich wirklich ein Beispiel dafür sehen, wie das Trainingsmaterial aussieht. Dieses Aussehen und Gefühl ist mir sehr wichtig. Ich möchte sichergehen, dass das Material professionell aussieht und nicht z.B. voller Cartoons oder handgezeichneter Bilder ist. Am ersten Tag, wenn unsere Mitarbeiter in die Trainingseinheit gehen und das Material zum ersten Mal abholen, möchte ich, dass sie beeindruckt sind. Der erste Eindruck ist wichtig.

Ebenso möchte ich wissen, was sie am Ende des Trainings bekommen werden. Werden sie ein ganzes Folienpaket, PDF-Dokumente mit Notizen und Fotos von Flipcharts erhalten? Sie wissen, was ich meine. Was auch immer es ist, ich möchte das im Voraus wissen. Muster sind also immer eine gute Idee.

Benötigen Sie Informationen über die Anbieter im Angebot?

Generell nicht, ich mache gerne meine Hausaufgaben, bevor jemand mit mir zur Angebotsphase kommt. Ich möchte mich einigermaßen sicher fühlen, dass der Anbieter dem Job gewachsen ist, egal um welchen Job es sich handelt. Bevor ich also um ein Angebot bitte, habe ich selbst ein wenig recherchiert und das schließt Referenzen von den vorhergehenden Kunden und solche Dinge mit ein. So etwas sollte vor einem Angebot gehandhabt werden, nicht während oder nach dem Prozess.

Wie viele Angebote sehen Sie sich für eine Sitzung an?

Im Allgemeinen will ich 2 oder 3. Mehr, und ich verschwende meine Zeit damit, herumzustochern und mache dann eigentlich keine gute Arbeit dabei, die guten Angebote überhaupt herauszufiltern. Es gibt Zeiten, in denen ich genau weiß, wonach ich suche, und dann reicht wahrscheinlich ein Anbieter schon aus. Sicher, für mich als internen Trainingsanbieter ist es wichtig, mehrere Anbieter zu haben. Aber wenn es Kurse gibt, bei denen wir nur einen bestimmten Anbieter verwenden, habe ich damit kein Problem.

Welche Angebote frustrieren Sie?

Ich denke, die Sache, die mich mehr als alles andere frustriert, ist, wenn man das Gefühl hat, dass man gerade das Gleiche bekommt, was sie an alle schicken. Es macht mich verrückt! Warum habe ich 2 Stunden damit verbracht, meine Situation zu erklären und bekomme trotzdem ein allgemeines Angebot zugeschickt? Das gibt mir das Gefühl, dass ich meine Zeit verschwendet habe. Ich habe nie die Absicht und werde wahrscheinlich nie (oder sehr selten) ein Produkt von der Stange kaufen.

Und da ist noch eine Sache. Angebote, die keinerlei Erwähnung über das beabsichtigte Ergebnis erhalten und das, was wir eigentlich erreichen wollen. Ich würde sagen, das sind die beiden frustrierendsten Dinge.

 


 

Wer ist der geheime Manager für Lernen & Entwicklung?

Der geheime L&E Manager ist in Wirklichkeit eine Vielzahl von L&E Managern.  Es sind echte Menschen, die es vorziehen würden, ihren Namen oder ihr Unternehmen nicht zu erwähnen – aber anonym schreiben wollen, damit sie ihre Ideen und Erfahrungen offen und direkt mit Kollegen teilen können.

Neun Wege mehr zu lernen… effektiv, angenehm und einfach!

Möchten Sie etwas effektiver, angenehmer und einfacher lernen? Dann merken Sie sich jeden einzelnen Buchstaben des Satzes im Dreieck und verinnerlichen die folgenden 9 Wege, genau das zu tun:

1. I Can – glaube es oder glaube es nicht!

Wie Henry Ford einmal sagte: “Ob Sie glauben, dass Sie etwas tun können oder ob Sie glauben, dass Sie es nicht können, Sie haben Recht!” Entscheiden Sie sich dafür, an sich selbst zu glauben – Ihr Potenzial ist unendlich und Ihr Bestes steht noch vor Ihnen!

2. Creativity – sie ist unendlich groß – lassen Sie ihr freien Lauf!

Wir sind kreativ geboren! Auch wenn wir unsere Kreativität noch lange nicht genutzt haben, so wartet sie doch darauf, entfesselt zu werden! Wie der Blechmann im Zauberer von Oz, braucht sie vielleicht einen Tropfen Öl! Machen Sie heute etwas ganz Neues oder etwas Altes auf eine ganz neue Art und Weise. Ihre kreative Fähigkeit ist unendlich. Beobachten Sie spielende Kinder und Sie werden unendliche Kreativität in vollem Gange sehen! Lassen Sie sich von ihnen inspirieren!

3. Attention/Mindfulness – Lernen Sie zu fokussieren und zu entspannen.

Lernen Sie, Ihre Aufmerksamkeit dort hin zu lenken, wo sie am meisten gebraucht wird und auf das, was im gegenwärtigen Moment wirklich wichtig ist. Während unsere Gesellschaft immer schneller und schneller wird, besteht die Tendenz darin, einen Geist zu entwickeln, der immer “rast” und anfällig für Ablenkung ist. Wir müssen lernen, unseren Geist zu entspannen. Lernen Sie Meditation, Entspannung, Yoga, Achtsamkeit, Tai Chi oder ähnliche Formen der Bewegung, die Ihren Geist beruhigen und Ihre Aufmerksamkeit verbessern.

4. Newness – Ihr Gehirn liebt Neues!

Als Sie zum ersten Mal diesen Planeten erblickten, war alles neu und in den ersten Jahren haben Sie gelernt zu gehen, zu reden, zu erkennen, zu essen und vieles mehr! In Zeiten großer Veränderungen lernen wir viel! Denken Sie also daran, wenn wir uns dem Wandel widersetzen, widersetzen wir uns auch dem Lernen! Also reisen Sie in eine ganz andere Kultur, lernen Sie etwas, von dem Sie dachten, dass Sie es nicht lernen könnten und probiere Sie ständig neue Wege aus, um alte Dinge zu tun. Wenn es nicht funktioniert, was soll’s, lernen Sie daraus und versuchen Sie stattdessen etwas anderes!

5. Learning Growth – Streben Sie kontinuierlich danach, die Art und Weise, wie Sie lernen, zu verbessern.

Vor dem Lernen sollten Sie sich ein Ziel setzen – das Wer, Was, Wann, Wo, Warum, Wie von dem, was Sie lernen möchten. Fragen Sie sich selbst – woher weiß ich, dass ich es gelernt habe – wie wollen  Sie sich selbst testen? Verschaffen Sie sich einen Überblick darüber, was gelernt werden muss. Benutzen Sie die linke und rechte Hälfte Ihres Gehirns – die logische und die kreative. Verwenden Sie zum Beispiel Farbe, Wörter, Bilder, Struktur, Bewegung, Rhythmus, Aufregung, Humor. Machen Sie es vor allem zu einem angenehmen Erlebnis! Nachdem Sie Ihr Lernziel erreicht haben, fragen Sie sich – was hat funktioniert und was könnte beim nächsten Mal besser gemacht werden?

6. Exercise – Den Körper trainieren

Recent research in Japan showed that people who exercise three times a week for half an hour have mental abilities 30% greater than those who don’t. It really stands to reason – do you think you learn more effectively if you physically exercise regularly? Test it and see – take time to exercise. The exercise can be gentle like walking, swimming, cycling or whatever type of exercise you like.

Neuere Untersuchungen in Japan haben gezeigt, dass Menschen, die dreimal pro Woche eine halbe Stunde lang Sport machen, sind geistig 30% leistungsfähiger als diejenigen, die dies nicht tun. Denken Sie, dass Sie effektiver lernen, wenn Sie regelmäßig körperlich trainieren? Testen Sie es und sehen Sie selbst – nehmen Sie sich Zeit für den Sport. Das Training kann so einfach sein, wie z.B. Gehen, Schwimmen, Radfahren oder jede andere Art von Übung, die Sie mögen.

7. Age – Den Geist trainieren

Egal wie viel Sie von Ihrem Gehirnpotenzial bisher genutzt haben, es gibt immer mehr zu nutzen – Sie habenn mindestens 100 Milliarden Gehirnzellen. Der Grund, warum wir glauben, dass sich ‘geistige Fähigkeiten mit dem Alter verschlechtern’, liegt darin, dass die meisten Menschen es glauben! Es gab auch eine Zeit, in der wir alle dachten, die Welt sei flach! Wir lagen alle falsch! Beginnen Sie daran zu glauben, dass Ihre mentalen Fähigkeiten mit dem Alter steigen können…. trainiere sie. Use it or lose it.

8. Reinforce – Beobachten Sie was funktioniert: Das Gesetz der Verstärkung

Jedes Verhalten, das bekräftigt wird, wird sich in der Regel wiederholen – also beobachten Sie weiter, was funktioniert und feiern Sie es! Stärken Sie weiterhin die Dinge im Leben von denen Sie mehr haben möchten. Denken Sie an alles, was funktioniert, und fragen Sie dich dann – wie kann ich den Rest verbessern?

9. Never give up learning to learn – Lernen Sie das Lernen: Hören Sie nicht damit auf.

Lernen ist Wachstum. Wachstum ist Lernen. Hören Sie nie auf zu lernen, zu erforschen. Ihre Leinwand wartet auf Ihr kreatives Meisterwerk. Geben Sie Das Lernen nie auf! Geben Sie das Erlernen des Lernens nie auf!

Nun, wenn Sie so weit gelesen haben, Gratulation. Wie Einstein einmal sagte: “Die wahre Kraft des Wissens liegt in seiner Anwendung”. Entscheide Sie sich, mindestens eine Handlung zu ergreifen, nachdem Sie diesen Artikel gelesen haben, und lernen Sie mehr…. effektiv, angenehm und einfach! Lasst uns wissen, wie es voran geht!

Über den Autor

Sean ist ein führender Experte dafür, wie Sie mehr von Ihrem unendlichen, geistigen Potenzial nutzen können. Er trainiert und coacht Organisationen und Einzelpersonen weltweit, um dieses unerschlossene unendliche geistige Potenzial zu erschließen. Mit über 25 Jahren Erfahrung in der Trainingsbranche hat Sean Schulungen für viele Unternehmen und Organisationen weltweit durchgeführt. Sie erfahren mehr über ihn unter: www.MindTraining.biz

5 Fragen, die Sie unbedingt stellen müssen, wenn Sie ein virtuelles Trainingsprogramm einrichten

Immer mehr unserer Kunden setzen auf die virtuelle Durchführung von Schulungen. Viele streben nach einer globalen Trainingslösung, bei der jeder Zugang zu der gleichen hohen Qualität der Ausbildung hat, unabhängig davon, wo sie sich befinden. Andere müssen die Reisekosten senken. Einige bewegen sich in Richtung mundgerechtes Lernen und bieten Training in kleineren Einheiten an. Dieses wachsende Interesse hat dazu geführt, dass wir bei Target Training häufig eine beratende Funktion bei Kunden übernehmen, die wenig oder gar keine Erfahrung im virtuellen Training haben. Nachfolgend finden Sie einige der Schlüsselfragen, die wir unseren Kunden nahegelegt haben, sich selbst zu stellen.

New Call-to-action

F1. Wie viel Erfahrung haben Ihre Teilnehmer im Umgang mit virtuellen Plattformen?

Es ist wichtig, die virtuelle Plattform, die Sie für die Durchführung von Schulungen verwenden, mit den Erlebnis- und Komfortzonen Ihrer Mitarbeiter abzustimmen. Wie vertraut sind die Teilnehmer des virtuellen Trainings mit der virtuellen Kommunikation im Allgemeinen?  Was können sie bereits tun? Und welche Systeme nutzen sie regelmäßig für z.B. virtuelle Meetings? Einige Teilnehmer nutzen täglich Videokonferenz-Tools für ihre regelmäßigen Check-Ins mit ihren virtuellen Kollegen. In einer solchen Umgebung sollten Sie ihre Fähigkeiten nutzen und Schulungen auf einer umfangreichen virtuellen Plattform mit vielfältigen und nützlichen Funktionalitäten durchführen. Webex Training Center und Adobe Connect sind gute Beispiele.

Wenn Ihre Mitarbeiter jedoch völlig neu in dieser Art von Arbeit und neu auf diesen Plattformen sind, dann machen Sie sich keine Sorgen. Geben Sie nicht viel Geld für eine hochwertige virtuelle Trainingsplattform aus, wenn die Benutzer die Tools nicht nutzen können.  Es gibt eine Menge einfacher, aber effektiver Plattformen, die für Ihre Mitarbeiter funktionieren könnten, und ihre Einfachheit bedeutet, dass es leichter ist damit zu arbeiten und es daher öfter genutzt wird. Erwägen Sie daher Skype für Unternehmen, Polycom oder BlueJeans.

Target Tipp – Wählen Sie eine virtuelle Trainingsplattform aus, die der Erlebnis- und Komfortzone Ihrer Mitarbeiter entspricht.

Q2. Was ist der kleinste gemeinsame Nenner, wenn es um Ihre technische Infrastruktur geht?

Viele unserer Kunden sind auf der Suche nach globalen Trainingslösungen für ihre Mitarbeiter auf der ganzen Welt – jeder sollte von dem gleichen Training profitieren können.  Wenn jedoch in bestimmten Teilen der Welt die verfügbare Bandbreite sehr langsam ist, Kameras deaktiviert sind, Soundkarten nicht Standard sind usw., wird dies unweigerlich Probleme verursachen und das Training negativ beeinflussen. Entweder wird diese Person echte Schwierigkeiten haben, voll am Training teilzunehmen, und/oder es wird zu Verzögerungen für alle anderen kommen.

Sie haben 2 Möglichkeiten – entweder arbeiten Sie mit dem kleinsten gemeinsamen Nenner, wenn es um Ihre technische Infrastruktur geht, und passen Sie dann die Ausbildung an dieses Niveau an ODER entscheiden Sie sich dafür, die Trainingsgruppe nach technischen Fähigkeiten aufzuteilen.

Target Tipp – Respektieren und passen Sie sich dem kleinsten gemeinsamen Nenner an, wenn es um Ihre technische Infrastruktur geht.

F3. Wie viel Erfahrung haben Ihre Mitarbeiter mit virtuellem Training?

Wenn Sie einen virtuellen Trainingsansatz für Menschen einrichten wollen, die bisher wenig oder gar keine Erfahrung mit dem Erhalt von virtuellem Training hatten, müssen Sie rechtzeitig planen, um ihnen beizubringen, wie sie das Beste aus der virtuellen Trainingsumgebung machen können.  Ihr Trainingsanbieter sollte dies für Sie tun können. Ein Teil dieser Zeit wird damit verbracht, die Teilnehmer in der Anwendung der Technologie zu schulen UND Sie müssen Ihren Teilnehmern auch helfen, mehr darüber zu erfahren, wie virtuelles Training anders aussehen und sich anders anfühlen kann. Der Vergleich mit einem klassischen Präsenzseminar wird nicht helfen.

Wenn Sie sich das virtuelle Training für Ihre virtuellen Teams ansehen, dann können Sie hier 2 Fliegen mit einer Klappe schlagen – as Team wird seine virtuellen Kommunikationsfähigkeiten entwickeln und gleichzeitig ihr Team stärken!

Target tip – Investieren Sie ein wenig Zeit in das Training der Personen. Damit diese sich in einer virtuellen Trainingsumgebung zurechtfinden und sich weiterentwickeln. Dies kann Teil der ersten Sitzung oder eine separate Veranstaltung sein.

F4. Wie viele Personen planen Sie zu den einzelnen virtuellen Trainingseinheit einzuladen?

Wenn es um klassische Präsenzseminare geht, sind sich die meisten Menschen bewusst, dass, wenn Sie das Training interaktiv und relevant für jeden Einzelnen halten wollen, Sie die Gruppengröße begrenzen müssen.  Gruppen von 10- 14 Personen sind üblich.

Beim virtuellen Training gehen viele Kunden davon aus, dass viel größere Gruppen möglich sind.  Meistens ist dies auf die Verwechslung von E-Learning und Webinaren mit virtuellem Training zurückzuführen.  Die maximale Anzahl von Personen, die wir zu einer virtuellen Trainingseinheit einladen möchten, wird von zwei Faktoren beeinflusst:

  1. Die Anzahl der Personen ist in einigen Fällen durch die Bandbreite begrenzt, die Ihnen und den Teilnehmern zur Verfügung steht. (siehe F2)
  2. Zweitens hängt es davon ab, wie einfach Sie die Gruppe leiten und das Training interaktiv und relevant für die einzelnen Teilnehmer halten können. Wir empfehlen dringend kleinere Gruppen – sechs ist die magische Zahl.  Größere Gruppen von bis zu 16 Personen können funktionieren, wenn Sie einen “Produzenten” zur Unterstützung des Trainers einsetzen. Der Produzent hilft dem Trainer, die Funktionalitäten und Werkzeuge innerhalb der Plattform zu managen und die Interaktion und Fragen im Auge zu behalten.  Sie werden auch dann eingreifen, wenn die Technologie Probleme verursacht.

Target Tipp  – Halten Sie die Trainingsgruppen kleiner, als Sie es normalerweise bei einem Präsenztraining tun würden.  Investieren Sie in einen Produzenten, wenn Sie größere Gruppen wünschen, da es so günstiger ist, als Sitzungen zweimal durchzuführen.

F5. Was tun wir vor oder nach dem virtuellen Training, um das Lernen zu fördern und den Transfer zu unserem Arbeitsplatz voranzutreiben?

Think about how you can make this a more enriched learning environment, and how you can help your staff apply what they learn to their workplace.  An example of pre- and/or post-training could be using your in-house learning management system. Maybe a “flipped classroom” work where a lot of the learning is inputted before the virtual training itself (meaning the virtual training session focuses on application)?  How about individual accountability calls with the trainer after the training? Or on-the-job coaching delivered virtually as in our Presenting in a virtual environment training?

Denken Sie darüber nach, wie Sie das Training zu einer bereicherten Lernerfahrung machen können und wie Sie Ihren Mitarbeitern helfen können, das Gelernte auf ihren Arbeitsplatz anzuwenden.  Ein Beispiel für Pre- und/oder Post-Training könnte die Verwendung Ihres internen Learning Management Systems sein. Vielleicht ein “umgedrehter Unterricht” (flipped classroom), in dem ein Großteil des Lernens vor dem virtuellen Training selbst behandelt wird (d.h. die virtuelle Trainingseinheit konzentriert sich nur auf die Anwendung)?  Wie sieht es mit individuellen Verantwortlichkeitsgesprächen mit dem Trainer nach dem Training aus? Oder on-the-job Coaching, dass virtuell durchgeführt wird, wie in unserem Training Präsentieren in einem virtuellen Umfeld?

Target Tipp – Positionieren Sie das virtuelle Training als Teil einer Lernreise. Unterstützen Sie Führungskräfte und Mitarbeiter dabei, die Rolle zu verstehen, die sie bei der Maximierung der Rendite der Trainingsinvestitionen spielen. Dieses eBook kann Ihnen helfen.

Go to the eBook
Wenn Sie mehr über virtuelles Training erfahren möchten, kontaktieren Sie uns einfach. Wir helfen Ihnen gerne weiter.

Virtuelle Vortragsweise: Erste Schritte

Obwohl viele Fachleute, Manager und Trainingsmanager von Virtual Delivery wissen, gibt es immer noch einige Unklarheiten darüber, was es ist und wie es funktioniert.  Hier sind einige häufige Fragen, die uns gestellt werden, wenn wir unsere Kunden bei der Integration von virtuellem Training in ihre Lernstrategien unterstützen.

Was meinen wir, wenn wir über virtuelles Training oder virtuelle Vortragsweise sprechen?

Virtuelles Training ist ein Training, bei dem sich einer oder mehrere der Teilnehmer nicht im selben Raum wie der Trainer befinden. Die Schulung erfolgt über eine der vielen “Unified Communication Plattformen”. Dieser Begriff umfasst Webkonferenz-Tools wie WebEx Training Center, Adobe Connect, Go Meeting oder Skype for Business sowie Videokonferenzdienste wie BlueJeans oder Polycom.

Virtuelles Training wird oft als eine internationale Lösung angesehen. So haben wir beispielsweise eine virtuelle Sitzung mit einem Trainer aus Frankfurt am Main und Teilnehmern aus Hawaii, Boston, Luxemburg und Singapur durchgeführt. Wenn Sie jedoch einen Trainer an einem Standort haben und Teilnehmer am selben Ort/im selben Land, aber in verschiedenen Räumen sind –  dann ist das auch virtuelles Training.

Inwiefern unterscheidet sich virtuelles Training von E-Learning oder Webinaren?

Diese Begriffe werden oft von der Marketingabteilung eines Trainingsanbieters definiert, aber normalerweise stimmen die meisten Fachleute für Lernen & Entwicklung folgendem zu:

  • E-Learning wird vom Lernenden geleitet und es gibt keinen Live-Trainer.  Das Lernen erfolgt im Selbststudium durch die Interaktion mit einem computergestützten Lernprogramm. Ein einfaches Beispiel ist Duolingo als App für das Sprachenlernen. SkillSoft ist ein Beispiel für E-Learning zur Entwicklung Ihrer Soft Skills.
  • Ein Webinar wird von einem Sprecher geleitet und hat wahrscheinlich etwa 50 Zuhörer – obwohl einige Webinare Hunderte im Publikum haben. Das Webinar wird über Video oder eine Videokonferenzplattform online durchgeführt und der Referent spricht die meiste Zeit. Am Ende hat er oder sie die Möglichkeit, Fragen zu beantworten, und wenn sie einen Moderator beauftragen, können interaktive Momente gestalten werden, z.B. um Input über eine Umfrage während des Webinars zu erlangen.
  • Virtuelles Training ist ein Trainer plus Teilnehmer. Im Idealfall ist das Training interaktiv, engagiert und an die Bedürfnisse der Teilnehmer angepasst.

Was bietet Ihnen das virtuelle Training, was ein Webinar nicht bietet?

Einfach ausgedrückt, geht es beim virtuellen Training um Lernen durch Interaktion, Engagement und Personalisierung – es ist aktives Lernen. Dazu gehört das Lernen vom Trainer, das Lernen aus persönlichen Erfahrungen und das Lernen voneinander z.B. über Diskussionen und Erfahrungsaustausch. Webinare sind vergleichbar mit Vorträgen oder Online-Präsentationen – das Lernen ist passiv und basiert ausschließlich auf dem Sprecher und den Inhalten, die er teilt.

Wie viele Teilnehmer können Sie virtuell zur gleichen Zeit trainieren?

Überraschenderweise gehen viele Personen davon aus, dass ‘virtuell’ auch mehr Teilnehmer bedeutet.  Dies basiert oft auf Erfahrungen in Webinaren mit mehr als 50 Personen. In einem Präsenztraining würden wir nie versuchen, 50 Teilnehmer im selben Raum zu schulen.  Typischerweise empfehlen wir 8-12 Teilnehmer, wobei 14 ein Maximum ist.  Jahrelange Erfahrung hat uns gezeigt, dass eine ideale Zahl für interaktives virtuelles Training etwa 6-8 Personen sind. Mit einer kleinen Gruppe wie dieser können Sie sicherstellen, dass Menschen die Möglichkeit haben, auf eine intimere Art und Weise miteinander zu interagieren, indem Sie Optionen wie ‘Breakout-Rooms’ nutzen, die in den funktionelleren Plattformen wie WebEx Training Center oder Adobe Connect zu finden sind. Diese Pausenräume bieten die gleichen Vorteile wie die Integration von Kleingruppenaktivitäten in einen Schulungsraum. Diese Interaktion ist wirklich wichtig, denn ein Großteil des Wertes des Trainings, ob virtuell oder persönlich, ist die Interaktion, die die Teilnehmer miteinander haben. Sie lernen nicht nur vom Trainer, sondern auch voneinander!

Was ist ein Produzent und warum brauchen wir einen?

Ein Produzent sorgt für einen reibungslosen Ablauf des virtuellen Trainings und unterstützt den virtuellen Trainer dabei, ein interaktives, personalisiertes und vor allem reibungsloses Trainingserlebnis zu bieten. Dies ermöglicht es dem Trainer, bis zu 50% größere Trainingsgruppen zu verwalten, z.B. 8-12 Teilnehmer. Zu ihren Aufgaben gehören:

  • technische Unterstützung der Teilnehmer vor, während und nach dem Training
  • Einrichtung von Breakout-Räumen, Umfragen etc.
  • Monitoring von Engagement und Beiträgen in Chats und Break-Out-Räumen
  • Aktivitäten gestalten
  • Zeitkontrollen mit dem Trainer und den Teilnehmern

For more information

Bei Target Training bieten wir alle unsere Lösungen auch in einem virtuellen Format an. Dazu gehören internes Business English mit unserem Virtual InCorporate Trainer, Präsentieren in einem virtuellem Umfeld und Leiten von virtuellen Teams. Wenn Sie mehr über unsere virtuellen Lösungen erfahren möchten, Zeit und Geld sparen und Ihren Schulungsumfang erweitern möchten, dann kontaktieren Sie uns einfach.

Virtuelles Training vs. Präsenztraining: Wie sieht es im Vergleich aus?

James Culver ist Partner der Target Training Gmbh und verfügt über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Entwicklung maßgeschneiderter Trainingslösungen. Er war in seinen beruflichen Stationen ein HR Training Manager, ein Major der US Army National Guard und ein Dozent an der International School of Management. Er ist auch ein talentierter Perkussionist und Geschichtenerzähler. Im letzten Teil dieser Serie von Blog-Posts über die Durchführung von virutellem Training beantwortete er die folgenden Fragen…

New Call-to-action

Sie verfügen über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Durchführung von Schulungen. Seit wann bieten Sie virtuelles Training an?

James Seit den 90er Jahren. In den Vereinigten Staaten haben wir sehr früh mit der virtuellen Vortragsweise im Community College-System begonnen. Wir hatten oft  kleine Gruppen von Studenten an abgelegeneren Standorten, die dennoch die Vorteile von Kursen nutzen wollten, die wir auf dem Hauptcampus anbieten würden, also begannen wir, virtuelle Schulungen anzubieten. Als ich anfing, mit virtuellem Training zu arbeiten, war es extrem teuer, einen Teil dieser Arbeit zu erledigen. Unser System war im Grunde genommen eine Kameraeinrichtung und der Professor oder der Trainer sprach nur mit der Kamera. Es gab nur sehr wenig Interaktion mit den anderen Standorten und es war wie eine Art TV- Schule.

Wie sehen Sie den Vergleich von virtuellem Training zu fact-to-face Training?

James Es gibt wahrscheinlich zwei Dinge, über die man nachdenken sollte. Eines ist der Inhalt, den man vorträgt und das andere ist der Kontext. Mit Kontext meine ich alles, was den Inhalt umgibt. Wie die Dinge gemacht werden, wer mit wem interagiert und wie sie interagieren – das Gros der Kommunikation. Was den Inhalt betrifft, so sind das behandelte Thema und die geteilten Informationen auf virtueller und persönlicher Ebene gut zu vergleichen. Tatsächlich sind die virtuellen Plattformen, die wir bei Target Training einsetzen, maßgeschneidert für die Bereitstellung vieler Inhalte auf interessante Weise. Es ist sehr einfach, Videos, Aufnahmen, Whiteboards usw. hinzuzufügen. Wenn wir zum Beispiel Inhalte haben, die auf einem Slide vorbereitet und den Leuten zur Verfügung gestellt werden, können sie diese kommentieren, Fragen stellen usw. Das ist auf einer virtuellen Plattform wirklich sehr einfach..

Was meistens schwieriger ist, ist alles, was damit zu tun hat, im selben Raum wie jemand anderes zu sein: Gesichtsausdruck ändern, Körpersprache ändern. Wir sehen oder bekommen das oft nicht in einer virtuellen Umgebung mit, selbst mit den marktführenden Systemen. Die Herausforderung als Trainer besteht darin, einen großen Teil der Informationen zu verlieren, die wir von den Teilnehmern eines klassischen Präsenztrainings erhalten würden. Das ist eine harte Nuss. Als Trainer im Präsenztraining habe ich ein Gefühl dafür, wie es läuft, weil ich im Raum bin. Es ist viel schwieriger, ein Gefühl dafür zu haben, wie es läuft, wenn man sich in einer virtuellen Umgebung befindet. Und du brauchst dieses “Gefühl”, damit du dich anpassen und den Teilnehmern die bestmögliche Lernerfahrung bieten kannst..

Welche Workaround-Strategien gibt es dafür?

James Es gibt Workaround-Strategien und durch externe und interne Schulungen und On-the-job-Erfahrungen nutzen unsere Trainer diese. Eine Strategie ist, dass man viele offene und geschlossene “Check-Fragen” stellen muss. Fragen wie “Bist du bei mir”, “Ist das klar?”, “Was sind also die Kernpunkte, die du daraus ableitest”, “Was sind deine bisherigen Fragen?” Erfahrene virtuelle Trainer werden diese Art von Fragen alle 2 bis 3 Minuten stellen.  Im Wesentlichen hat ein Trainer ein Zeitlimit von 2 bis 3 Minuten für seinen Input, bevor er eine Check-Frage stellen sollte. Die Check-Fragen sollten sowohl offen für die Gruppe als auch für eine Einzelperson bestimmt sein.

Welche Schulungsthemen eignen sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise und welche nicht?

James Die Themen, die sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise eignen, sind diejenigen, die stärker auf Inhalte ausgerichtet sind – zum Beispiel klassische Präsentationsfähigkeiten oder virtuell ausgeführte Präsentationen.  Diese Art von Trainingslösungen konzentrieren sich auf Input, Tipps, Do’s und Don’ts, Best Practice Sharing und dann Praxis – Feedback – Praxis – Feedback etc..

Another theme that works very well for us when delivered virtually is virtual team training, whether it be working in virtual teams or leading virtual teams. By their very nature, virtual teams are dispersed so the virtual delivery format fits naturally. Plus, you are training them using the tools they need to master themselves. And of course, another benefit is if the training is for a specific virtual team the shared training experience strengthens the team itself.

Ein weiteres Thema, das für uns virtuell sehr gut funktioniert, ist das virtuelle Teamtraining, sei es in virtuellen Teams oder bei der Leitung virtueller Teams. Virtuelle Teams sind naturgemäß so verteilt, dass das virtuelle Übertragungsformat auf natürliche Weise passt. Außerdem trainieren Sie sie mit den Werkzeugen, die sie später selbst beherrschen sollten. Und natürlich ist ein weiterer Vorteil: Das Training für ein bestimmtes virtuelles Team, stärkt die gemeinsame Trainingserfahrung des Teams.

Die Arten von Trainingslösungen, die virtuell eine größere Herausforderung darstellen, sind diejenigen, bei denen wir versuchen, uns selbst oder andere zu verändern. Themen wie Durchsetzungsfähigkeit oder effektiveres Arbeiten müssen sorgfältig durchdacht und entwickelt werden, wenn sie mehr als ein Informationsdepot sein sollen. Hier ist der Coaching-Aspekt weitaus wichtiger.

Schließlich, und vielleicht überraschenderweise, kann das Management- und Führungstraining wirklich gut funktionieren, wenn es virtuell durchgeführt wird. Unsere Lösung Hochleistung zu erzielen ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür. Das Geheimnis dabei ist, das kleine Lernen zu betonen, zusätzliche Ressourcen außerhalb der Sitzung bereitzustellen, z.B. umgedrehter Unterricht (flipped classroom) mit relevanten Videos und Artikeln, und auch Möglichkeiten für Einzelgespräche zu bieten.

5 Dinge, die Sie tun können, um virtuelles Training zu einem Erfolg zu machen.

E-Learning gibt es seit 1960 und auch der “virtuelle Besprechungsraum” ist keine neue Idee. Viele Unternehmen haben bereits Erfahrung mit dem Lernen über Online-Plattformen oder mobiles Lernen und verfügen bereits über eine Art Werkzeug, um sich zu treffen und virtuell zusammenzuarbeiten. Der Sprung vom virtuellen Meeting zum virtuellen Training scheint einfach zu sein – und das ist es, wenn man sorgfältig darüber nachdenkt, was nötig ist, um das virtuelle Training erfolgreich zu machen. Hier sind ein paar Dinge, die wir in 7 Jahren virtueller Trainingseinheiten gelernt haben.

Arbeiten Sie mit einem Trainer zusammen, der in der Lage ist, in einer virtuellen Umgebung zu gestalten, zu implementieren und sicher zu debriefen.

Kunden kommen mit ihrer Erfahrung aus dem Präsenztraining zu uns. Sie wissen, was sie in einem eintägigen Seminar erreichen können und wollen diese Erfahrung in eine virtuelle Trainingsumgebung übertragen. Allerdings ist nicht alles direkt übertragbar. In einer persönlichen Sitzung beobachtet, reagiert und passt sich ein Trainer spontan an. Sie überwachen ständig, was funktioniert und was nicht, was die Leute verstehen und was nicht etc. In gewisser Weise “spürt” der Trainer, wie das Training abläuft. Mit der virtuellen Bereitstellung haben Trainer weniger Möglichkeiten, dies zu tun.  Eine häufige Antwort für den Trainer ist, sich viel mehr auf den Inhalt zu konzentrieren als auf die Trainingsdynamik. Dies kann das Training in eine Vorlesung verwandeln.

Virtuelles Training erfordert Trainer mit neuen Fähigkeiten, Qualifikationen und Erfahrungen. Sie benötigen einen erfahrenen Trainer, der in der Lage ist, in einer virtuellen Umgebung zu gestalten, zu implementieren und sicher zu debriefen.

Zeit für Interaktionen schaffen

Wie bereits oben erwähnt, ist es in einem Präsenzseminar einfach und natürlich, dass Interaktionen stattfinden – entweder mit dem Trainer oder zwischen den Teilnehmern.  Wenn Sie ein Training virtuell durchführen, wird dies viel schwieriger. Gehen Sie nicht davon aus, dass die Interaktion leicht erfolgen wird. Für Gruppen ist es viel schwieriger, sich tatsächlich zu treffen und in einer virtuellen Umgebung ein Gefühl füreinander zu bekommen. Ein erfahrener und qualifizierter Trainer findet Abhilfe: Interaktionen werden geplant, Aktivitäten werden sorgfältig entworfen und mehr Zeit für Gruppen- und Paaraktivitäten aufgewendet.

Die Trainingsgruppen klein halten

Der Schwierigkeitsgrad der Aktivierung und Förderung von Interaktion bedeutet, dass kleinere Gruppen (nicht größere Gruppen) in einer virtuellen Umgebung ein Muss sind. Unsere Erfahrung ist, wenn Sie über den Wissenstransfer hinausgehen wollen, um Fähigkeiten aufzubauen und Verhaltensweisen zu ändern, ist eine Gruppe von 6 Personen ideal. Je mehr Teilnehmer Sie über 6 hinaus haben, desto schwieriger wird die Interaktion, und desto wahrscheinlicher ist es, dass jemand mental abschaltet und/oder mit Multi-Tasking beginnt – und desto mehr Zeit benötigt der Trainer, um die technische Umgebung zu überwachen und zu kontrollieren und sich nicht auf die Personen selbst zu konzentrieren.

Für Gruppen über 8 Personen sollten Sie einen fähigen und erfahrenen “Producer” beauftragen. Ein Producer unterstützt den Trainer bei der Verwaltung der virtuellen Umgebung, der Überwachung von Interaktionen, der Einrichtung von Breakout-Räumen und der Aufrechterhaltung von Geschwindigkeit, Fluss und Interaktion usw.  Ein erfahrener technischer Producer kann es dem Trainer leicht ermöglichen, mit mehr als 12 Teilnehmern zu arbeiten.

Halten Sie mehrere Sitzungen von max. 2,5 Stunden statt einer langen Sitzung

Ein ganztägiges Präsenzseminar lässt sich nicht in ein ganztägiges virtuelles Seminar übersetzen. In einer virtuellen Umgebung können sich die Menschen nicht so lange konzentrieren. Unsere Erfahrung zeigt, dass 2 – 2 ½ Stunden die maximale Dauer für eine einzelne Sitzung ist. Das bedeutet, dass Sie über drei zweistündige virtuelle Sitzungen nachdenken sollten, die einem Tag Präsenztraining entsprechen. Sie können eine ähnliche Menge an Training in der gleichen Zeit abdecken, aber wenn Sie das Training virtuell durchführen, müssen Sie den Ansatz neu gestalten, aufteilen und aufschlüsseln.

Planen Sie sorgfältig, wenn Sie mit mehreren Zeitzonen arbeiten

Ein Vorteil des virtuellen Trainings ist, dass jeder überall teilnehmen kann. Wir empfehlen Ihnen, sich davon nicht mitreißen zu lassen. Es kann Sie Geld sparen, aber Sie verlieren die volle Wirksamkeit des Trainings. Nach unserer Erfahrung ist es eine große Herausforderung für die Teilnehmer und den Trainer, wenn einige um sechs Uhr morgens, einige während der Mittagspause und einige um sechs Uhr abends dabei sind. Die Achtung der Konzentrationsspanne und des Umfelds der Menschen wird sich am Ende auszahlen.

 


Für weitere Informationen

Wenn Sie neu in der virtuellen Vortragsweise sind, Ihr virtuelles Vortragen hochfahren möchten oder daran interessiert sind, Ihr virtuelles Training interaktiver und wertvoller zu gestalten, dann finden Sie einen erfahrenen Partner oder einen Berater. Wir könnten die Richtigen für Sie sein, wer weiß. Wenn Sie daran denken, mit einem virtuellen Training zu beginnen, dann Fragen Sie Angebot an. Seien Sie sich darüber im Klaren, was Sie erreichen wollen, und bitten Sie die Anbieter, Ihnen mitzuteilen, was Sie benötigen, damit es funktioniert.

The Secret L&D manager: 4 questions for screening potential training providers

This month’s Secret L&D manager is German, and works for a global telecommunications organization. He’s been working in training and development for over 20 years for a variety of organizations including automotive, financial services and higher education. He’s lived in multiple countries and is interested in balancing classic approaches with virtual learning and MOOCs (Massive Open Online Courses). We asked him, What questions do you ask potential training providers when they first approach you?

This eBook is also available in German – follow the link below.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

I get contacted by training providers on a regular basis, and to be honest how much time I give them depends a lot on what else is going on.  However I’m always interested in new ideas which I think can add value to our associates here and do try to make time to ask questions and learn.  I tend to get straight into things and want to take control of the conversation. I’ll ask questions like …

Tell me the two or three topics that you as a training provider are specialized in?

I’m not interested in working with training providers who say they can do everything. So what are the 2 or 3 things that you are good at? I want details. I want to see experience and innovative ideas. I want them to be able to talk me through activities and the “why” behind the activity.

If I feel they know about training and are not trying to promise the earth, my second question needs to be about their trainers. Knowing more about who their trainers are is hugely important to me and I need to know they’ll fit my training population. I ask something like ….

Who are your trainers? How do you find them? How do you select them? What is their background?

I was a trainer myself, and still do some internal training.  I know the impact and potential of the training is realized (or limited by) by the person in the room – by the trainer.  I want specifics and real examples from a potential training provider. I’m not interested in general broad-brush descriptions. I want to know who they would use to deliver a specific solution and to know why that person, what’s their experience, style etc.

I’d then ask …

Why do you think you’re different from all the other trainers and training providers that offer similar things?

Seriously, explain to me why what’s special or different about what you’re proposing? Otherwise, why should I change?  If they stop and think about the answer, that’s fine. If they babble, then I’m not interested. For me a training provider needs to know themselves why they are different or special.

My last question would be something like …

Before we spend any more time on this can you explain your pricing model?

I want to know what they charge for a one-day, off-the-shelf training program. The kind of thing that’s really a commodity product.  I want to know pricing for a customization and preparation, and I want to know if travel and expenses are included or not.

I want to find an example. I’ll pick something simple, so I know if their rates are competitive and if this actually makes sense to me and our situation. If you deliver a standard 2-day presentation skills training for me, what will the cost be for 10 people? And if it’s much more expensive than what I already have, or if I have no real reason to believe that they will be genuinely considerably better than my current solution, then that’s time saved for both sides. I also want a clear answer here.

I think these are my top four questions. These are pretty much what I need as a basis.  If I’m interested, then I’d like to meet them in person and see where we go from there.

Who is the Secret L&D manager?

The Secret L&D manager is actually many L&D managers.  They are real people who would prefer not to mention their name or company – but do want to write anonymously so they can openly and directly share their ideas and experience with peers. Also from the Secret L&D manager:

 

 

Making sure managers understand the importance of their role in developing our staff

This month’s Secret L&D manager is Australian, based in Germany and works for an American corporation which produces machine vision systems and software.  He has worked in training and development for over 18 years – as an L&D manager, an in-house trainer and as an external training provider.

New Call-to-actionWhat are your challenges as an L&D manager?

One of the things that’s burning at the moment is helping the managers I work with see the role they play in developing people.  This is not a question of lack of willingness on their side – just a lack of awareness of the role they can and should play. For example, most of the time if they know that Dieter needs to improve his presentation skills, they send him on one of the 2-day presentation courses we run. When Dieter gets back, they expect that they can tick a box and say, “Well, Dieter can present now.” This is a start, but it isn’t good enough. It is not enough for them to assume that the training department or the training provider is going to solve everything alone. I need to help them see their role in developing their staff’s skills.

How do you see the manager’s role in developing their staff?

If we look at the 70-20-10 model, just 10% of the change will come from the training itself. 20% is when Dieter is learning from his colleagues, sharing ideas and giving each other tips and feedback. BUT, the other 70% will come from just getting up there and doing it (best of course, if supplemented with feedback and guidance where required). If the manager wants somebody to get better at a skill, they need to make sure there is plenty of opportunity for that person to actually use that skill, give them support and guidance and let them use what they are learning. This is clearly in the manager’s hands.  I want our managers to be realistic in their expectations and see the role that they play in the developmental process. We work together.

How do you see your role in this?

I have a number of roles. I work to identify current and future training needs. I then organize practical training with training providers who are going to deliver what we need and challenge the participants to really improve.  I also need to help our managers understand their role in developing our staff and encourage them to see training as a collaborative effort between them, the employee, us in L&D, and the training providers.  And of course, the person getting the training needs to take some responsibility and ownership for their own development – and I can offer advice and support here too, both before and after the “formal” training. Our experts need to be present in the training and they need to actively look to use what they have learned and practiced after the training too. And again, this is where their manager plays an important role.

Who is the secret L&D manager?

The “secret L&D manager” is actually a group of L&D managers. They are real people who would prefer not to mention their name or company – but do want to write anonymously so they can openly and directly share their ideas and experience with peers.

You can meet more of our secret L&D managers here …

And if you’d like to share your thoughts and experiences without sharing your name or company then please get in touch.

Does the Peter Principle still hold true? (And what you can do to develop your managers.)

Nearly half a century ago Laurence J. Peter published his seminal work on selection and promotion, “The Peter Principle”.  In this satirical look at why things go wrong in businesses, he argued that the selection of a candidate for a position is based on the candidate’s performance in their current role, rather than on abilities relevant to the intended role. Thus, employees only stop being promoted once they can no longer perform effectively, and “managers rise to the level of their incompetence.” His theory is so convincing that you feel it must be one of those natural laws that is just simply true, and indeed the Peter Principle is based on the behavioural observation that there is a strong temptation for people to use what has worked before, even when this might not be appropriate for the new situation.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

Over the last couple of decades I have had the impression that the Peter principle is either out of fashion or no longer as relevant. Management training is now so widespread that all managers are now allegedly agile, change agents, ace communicators and inspirational. Yet intuitively I have always felt the Peter Principle in its elegant simplicity must still hold true, so you can imagine my relief when I came across an article in the Times by Alexandra Frean entitled, “Rise of the accidental manager lies behind UK’s low productivity”. She uses the term ‘accidental managers’ and explains “they have excelled in their role and are rewarded with promotion to a management position that is entirely different from the job they have been doing, only to flounder when they get there.” Does this sound familiar? The focus of her article is that accidental managers are more prevalent in the UK and account for the UK’s poor productivity. According to Ann Francke, head of the Chartered Management Institute (CMI), four out of five bosses in Britain are accidental managers; so 2.4 million managers are probably not delivering to full capability. And international comparisons indicate UK managers perform 30% below the benchmarked countries of Germany and Scandinavia. Francke does not agree that good managers are born not made and makes an impassioned plea for more and better training.

Which neatly brings us on to the question: What does effective management training look like? Here are four thoughts to consider:

Invest early

Building skills, knowledge and behaviors in young managers can provide spectacular results for years to come! Simply teaching and training simple skills for managing the task, the team and the individuals, does yield real returns. More investment at the beginning is a must especially training solutions for when they first move into management  .

Show the managers that their managers care about the training

Research consistently shows that when a training participant’s manager shows interest and involvement this is the single most important factor in transferring the training to the workplace. Involvement starts with explaining the purpose of the training and linking it to values, strategy and concrete business needs. It finishes with senior managers who are committed to delivering results through developing performance. And keep this human!

Fewer models

There are hundreds of management, communication, team, interpersonal dynamics, and strategy models. Good management training understands that models can be useful BUT they need to be simple to grasp, easy to remember and actionable. And be aware of trying to bend a model out of shape just to fulfil a trainer’s desire to show how everything fits. Managers can deal with complexity too!

Skill drills beat bullet points

It’s not what you know it’s what you do as a manager that counts. Discussing the role of feedback, exploring SCARF, sharing horror stories can be useful BUT the most important things is to get managers practicing, practicing and practicing.  Skill drills change behaviors and build confidence.  Yes, role-plays aren’t real but they give you an opportunity to experiment and practice! And my experience is that investing in business actors always add value too. This is why Target’s own leadership and management programs focus on doing (again and again).

 

 

 

 

Are language tests really the best way to assess your employees business English skills?

When a department manager asks us to “test their employee’s business English” there are typically 2 reasons – they want to know if somebody is suitable for a specific job, or they are looking for evidence that somebody has improved their business English. In both cases we fully understand the need for the information – and we often find ourselves challenging the idea of a “test”. HR & L&D, line managers, business English providers, teachers and participants are all familiar with the idea of tests – we’ve all been doing them since we started school – but as a business tool they have clear limits. 

DOWNLOAD THE CAN-DO TOOLBOX hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘6da22dcf-c124-41f2-8a4f-6f3a8c60c362’, {});

Are language tests really the best fit for purpose when it comes to corporate English training?

At the heart of these limits is the question “does the test really reflect the purpose?”.  These limits were highlighted in a recent newspaper article “Difficulty of NHS language test ‘worsens nurse crisis’”. The article focuses on the shortage of nurses applying for work in the UK, and behind this shortage are 2 factors: firstly the inevitable (and avoidable) uncertainty created by Brexit, and secondly that qualified and university-educated nurses who are native English speakers from countries such as Australia and New Zealand are failing to pass the English language test the NHS uses. One of the nurses said:“After being schooled here in Australia my whole life, passing high school with very good scores, including English, then passing university and graduate studies with no issues in English writing – now to ‘fail’ IELTS [the English language test] is baffling.”

To be clear there is nothing wrong with the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) per se. It is one of the most robust English language tests available, and is a multi-purpose tool used for work, study and migration. The test has four elements: speaking, listening, reading and writing.  My question is “Is this really the best way to assess whether a nurse can do her job effectively in English?”

Design assessment approaches to be as close to your business reality as possible

We all want nurses who can speak, listen, read and write in the language of the country they are working in – but is a general off-the-shelf solution really the best way?  What does a nurse need to write?  Reports, notes, requests – yes …essays – no.  Yet that is what was being “tested”. One nurse with 11 years experience in mental health, intensive care, paediatrics, surgical procedures and orthopaedics commented: “The essay test was to discuss whether TV was good or bad for children. They’re looking for how you structure the essay … I wrote essays all the time when I was doing my bachelor of nursing. I didn’t think I’d have to do another one. I don’t even know why I failed.”

Jumping from nursing to our corporate clients, our InCorporate Trainers work in-house, training business English skills with managers in such diverse fields as software development, automotive manufacturing, oil and gas, logistics, purchasing etc etc . All these managers need to speak, read, write and listen and they need to do these within specific business-critical contexts such as meetings, negotiations, presentations, emails, reports etc. So how do we assess their skills? The key is in designing assessment approaches which are as close to their business reality as possible.

Using business specific can-do statements to assess what people can do in their jobs

The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) is a scale indicating language competency. It offers an excellent start for all business English programs. BUT the CEFR does have 2 major drawbacks when it comes to business English:

  • The CEFR is not specifically focussed on business-related communication
  • The CEFR levels are broad, impacting their suitability for assessing the progress of professionals with limited training availability

In 2010, and in response to our client’s demand for a business-related focus, we developed a robust set of can-do statements. These statements focus on  specific business skills such as meetings, networking and socializing, presenting, working on the phone and in tele- and web-conferences. Rather than assessing a software developers writing skills by asking them to write an essay on whether TV is good or bad for kids we ask them to share actual samples – emails, functional specifications, bug reports etc.  They don’t lose time from the workplace and it allows us to look at what they can already do within a work context. The Business Can-do statements then provide a basis for assessing their overall skills.

This “work sample” approach can also be used when looking to measure the impact of training. Before and after examples of emails help a manager see what they are getting for their training investment and, in cooperation with works councils, many of our InCorporate Trainers use a portfolio approach where clients keep samples of what they are learning AND how this has transferred to their workplace.  This practical and easily understandable approach is highly appreciated by busy department heads.

To wrap up, I understand that the NHS relying on a reputable off-the-shelf solution like IELTS has clear attractions. However, if you are looking at assessing at a department level then consider other options.  And if you’d like support with that then contact us.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

How great training clients maximize the impact of their training budget

A common question I am asked in client meetings is ‘What makes a “great” training provider?’ and then of course I’m asked to show that we are one. There are a lot of factors involved in being a great training provider, from having the right trainers, to providing relevant training (that is easily transferred to the workplace), and from having the right processes right down to the flexibility and adaptability of the program, based on the changing business needs of the participants. In part, our greatness is achieved because of great clients and we are very lucky to have many of those across Europe ranging in size and spanning numerous industries. Like great training providers share common characteristics, so do great training clients. Below are are three of them.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘0377217d-6395-4d26-a5fc-d32a69e484a5’, {});

1. Great training clients really get the importance of buy-in on multiple levels

Training, whether it be Business English, soft skill or leadership programs, is most successful when there is buy-in across the board. HR and L&D are important, but it is the buy-in from operational and line managers that makes a real difference. Managers at all levels and team leaders all have a role to play. The managers of our “great clients” share the “why?” behind the training. They look to link it to strategy and decisions, and show that they are personally expecting commitment and engagement. This buy-in keeps the participants focused and aware of why they are training on certain topics.  This management buy-in also supports the work of HR and L&D, energizing their efforts and challenging them to challenge us when it comes to questions such as training design, transfer to the workplace, and continual improvements. So, if you have multiple levels of management, HR and participant buy-in, you will definitely see results tied to your company goals and get a lot more out of your training investment.

2. Great training clients give feedback when things are great and when things could be better

When we put our heart and soul into delivering training, we love hearing that we are doing a great job. Even when the training doesn’t fully meet the client’s expectations, we want to hear about it. Our best clients understand that we value what they have to say and tell us openly, on a regular basis. The more consistent clients are with feedback, the easier it is to address any issues that may arise. Being clear about communication needs, proactively collaborating on training goals, content and methods, and sharing the background to decisions work to build robust relationships creates a lot of trust and understanding that leads to productive, long-term and fun partnerships. Win-Win is remarkably easy when both sides genuinely care about the other.

3. Great training clients are open to new ideas and approaches

It is great when a client knows what they want. It can make our job as a training provider that much easier – after all you know your staff, your corporate culture and what works well.  AND, we also value the chance to apply our years and years of experience when the situation presents itself. Our best clients know that they can trust our expertise and, after exploring the whys and hows, are willing to give it a chance.  We understand we have to earn that trust, but need a chance to do so.  So, know what you want as a customer, challenge what your suppliers may suggest at times but also be open to new ideas as you may be pleasantly surprised what your supplier can do.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

„Train the Trainer“: Interaktive Präsentationen

Hausinterne Trainingsmaßnahmen und Schulungen werden oft über Präsentationen durchgeführt, wobei häufig ein interner „Experte“ mit der Durchführung gegenüber anderen Mitarbeitern beauftragt wird. Folie für Folie erscheint nacheinander auf der Projektionsfläche und am Ende erhält man ein Informationsblatt mit den wichtigsten Punkten und vielleicht eine Zusammenfassung. Der Vorteil dieser Art von Training liegt darin, dass die Informationen aus erster Hand von einem erfahrenen Fachmann vermittelt werden. Einer der Nachteile liegt darin, dass der Vortragende meist keine Erfahrungen in der Wissensvermittlung hat. Er/sie versteht nichts davon, wie Lerninhalte haften bleiben oder dass nur rund 10% des Lernens durch strukturiertes Training vermittelt wird (Hier können Sie mehr über das 70-20-10-Modell erfahren). Wir haben deshalb ein paar bewährte Ideen zusammengestellt, wie Sie Ihr präsentationsbasiertes Training interaktiv gestalten können.




Contact us now




Wer bist du und warum bist du hier?

Ein Trainer vermittelt stets die Ziele einer Trainingseinheit. Die Ziele müssen von Relevanz für das Publikum sein, weil Sie Akzeptanz benötigen, damit Lernen stattfinden kann. Alles was im Training passiert, sollte stets mit den Trainingszielen verknüpft sein. Die Teilnehmer haben ebenfalls Ziele, welche sich allerdings von Ihren Zielen unterscheiden können. Hier müssen Sie die unterschiedlichen Zielvorstellungen in Übereinstimmung bringen. Das wird oft mit Aufwärmaktivitäten erreicht; Wer bist du und warum bist du hier? Aufwärmaktivitäten können als Gruppe, in mehreren Kleingruppen oder paarweise durchgeführt werden. Zum Abschluß der Aktivitäten hat jeder seine persönlichen Ziele mitgeteilt (idealerweise in sichtbarer Form, so dass es jeder lesen kann). Der Trainer umschreibt dann die persönlichen Ziele und verknüpft sie mit den Zielen der Trainingseinheit. Gibt es Ziele, die nicht in Übereinstimmung gebracht werden können, so wird der Trainer darauf hinweisen: „Es tut mir leid, wir werden das heute nicht im Detail behandeln“ oder „Vielleicht finden wir am Ende der Trainingseinheit noch Zeit, das Thema zu vertiefen.“

Lassen Sie die Leute aufstehen und sich bewegen

Wenn Teilnehmer sich untereinander nicht sonderlich gut kennen sind vielleicht ein paar Eisbrecher-Aktivitäten notwendig. Ein Spiel mit dem Namen ‘find someone who’ kann sehr leicht für jedes Publikum und Thema angepasst werden. Darüber hinaus können Sie Diskussionskarten mitbringen oder Aufgaben vergeben, welche die Teilnehmer zwischen zwei Präsentationsfolien zu erledigen haben. Besonders dann, wenn das Interesse der Teilnehmer zu schwinden scheint, unterbrechen Sie die Präsentation, lassen Sie die Leute aufstehen und sich im Raum bewegen. Bitten Sie die Teilnehmer etwa, Brainstorming in Gruppen durchzuführen, paarweise Zusammenfassungen zu erstellen oder Fehlersuche zu betreiben. Sie können die Teilnehmer auch auffordern, eine Position im Raum einzunehmen, welche damit verknüpft ist, wie stark sie mit einer unternehmens- oder tätigkeitsbezogenen Aussage übereinstimmen. Bitten Sie die Teilnehmer, einige der wichtigsten Lernpunkte der Präsentation Ihnen auf halbem Weg vorzustellen und nutzen sie die Gelegenheit, das Teilnehmerwissen auszurichten.

Beziehen Sie Ihr Publikum ein

Eng verwandt mit den oben angesprochenen Aspekten. Auch wenn das Trainingsmaterial trocken und mit Fakten und Fachbegriffen gespickt ist, können Sie das Training interaktiv gestalten. Sie können die Teilnehmer nahezu auf tausend verschiedene Arten beschäftigen. Befragen Sie die Teilnehmer nach ihrer Erfahrung oder Meinung, bitten Sie darum, dass jemand die Informationen einer Präsentationsfolie vorliest oder bereiten Sie ein Quiz oder einen Wettbewerb mit einem symbolischen Hauptgewinn vor. Eröffnen Sie eine Diskussion, bitten Sie um den Zuruf von Kurzfragen oder lassen Sie die Leute sich im Raum bewegen, um Informationen zum Thema an verschiedenen Stationen im Raum einzuholen. Hier finden Sie 25 Ideen für Aktivitäten beim Training.

Bitten Sie um engagierte Teilnahme

Was wird von den Teilnehmern an Handlungen erwartet, sobald sie den Schulungsraum verlassen haben? Sie haben zwar etwas gelernt, aber auf die Beantwortung der Frage, wie der Lerntransfer zum Arbeitsplatz stattfindet, sollten Sie sich selbst gedanklich gut vorbereiten. Bevor die Trainingseinheit abgeschlossen ist, sollten Sie sich ausreichend Zeit nehmen, die Teilnehmer nach ihren Ideen oder Anregungen zu fragen. Geben Sie Ratschläge, wie das Erlernte haften bleibt. Sie können auch den Einsatz von persönlichen Lernplänen in Erwägung ziehen.

WEITERFÜHRENDE INFORMATIONEN

Hier sind nur einige Postings für Sie zum Durchstöbern aufgeführt, falls Sie mehr zum Thema erfahren möchten. Wir bieten auch eine breite Palette an Seminaren zum Thema Train the Trainer und Moderation von Workshops an:

 

How we built the Business English can-do statements: An interview with Chris Slattery

How good is your business English? B1? C2? These terms didn’t mean much to most of us ten years ago or so, but today the Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) is an international standard for describing language ability. It is used around the world to describe learners’ language skills. The 20 years of research the Council of Europe put into designing and rolling out the CEFR  was undoubtedly worthwhile: we now have a robust basis for a common understanding of what language levels mean. However, the CEFR is not business English specific – it was was designed for general education purposes. It doesn’t directly connect to day-to-day business communication scenarios. It doesn’t directly meet the language training needs facing businesses and corporations today, nor does it directly address common business communication scenarios.

In 2010, Target Training worked with the worlds largest courier company, Deutsche Post DHL, and another language training provider (Marcus Evans Linguarama) to close this gap. The outcome was a detailed set of can-do statements usable by employees, their managers and training providers alike. Chris Slattery lead the project at Target Training, and I asked him a few questions about this project.

DOWNLOAD THE CAN-DO TOOLBOX hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘6da22dcf-c124-41f2-8a4f-6f3a8c60c362’, {});

What made you want to get involved in this project?

Chris: We had been working closely with the Corporate Language School at DP DHL for over 5 years, and they were keen to begin measuring their training investment. A major part of this was being able to measure learning progress. They had tried to use an off-the-shelf solution but it wasn’t working, and the CEFR was too abstract to use in a business environment. We’d been working closely together trying to make things work – and when it was clear that the tools just weren’t strong enough they asked us if we could build a business specific tool which was founded in the CEFR levels. We asked that if we were going to be the “developer” another provider be involved as a “tester” to ensure the end product was robust and practical. This is how Lingurama became involved, and this 3-way collaboration strengthened the project.

The CEFR isn’t designed to recognize gaps in performance at work. Our Business English can-do statements mean that managers can identify where they would like to see an improvement in performance, and we then know how to get them there.

Chris Slattery

How did you decide what a successful solution would look like?

Chris: Quite simply, success was a tool that managers and participants could easily use when analyzing needs, setting goals and evaluating progress. We needed something that reflected the specific business skills managers are looking to improve. This meant we had to adapt what was in the CEFR and re-couch it in terms that were relevant for the business world. For example to move from academic and linguistic terms to practical business communication needs.

Can you give an example of a scenario?

Chris: Sure. Take someone who has had English at school and then worked in the States as an au pair for two years. They speak good English with a Boston accent. When they joined DP DHL they had the opportunity to join our InCorporate Trainer program. Whenever somebody new joins the training Target Training needs to assess their English skills.  This lady got placed at CEFR B2, which shows a good degree of competency … but she had never worked in a company before joining DP DHL -and now she needed to go and deliver a presentation in English. How well was she going to be able to do that?

Her general CEFR level is B2, but in her ability to give effective status presentations in English, she might be as low as A2. This discrepancy is huge. The CEFR isn’t designed to recognize gaps in performance at work. The Business English can-do statements mean that these managers can identify where they would like to see an improvement in performance, and we then know how to get them there.

We needed something that reflected the specific business skills managers are looking to improve. This meant we had to adapt what was in the CEFR and re-couch it in terms that were relevant for the business world. For example to move from academic and linguistic terms to practical business communication needs.

Chris Slattery

The full CEFR document is 273 pages long. Where did you start?

Chris: We started by studying the CEFR document in real depth, and understanding how it was built and why certain can-do statements are phrased in specific ways.  At the same time we also agreed with the client which business fields made the most impact on their day-today communication – skills like “presentations”, “networking”, “negotiating” etc . We then reread the CEFR handbook and identified which can-do statements could be directly transferable to business communication scenarios. Then we broke these business fields down into language skills, and used the can-dos in the CEFR document which best fitted these language skills. Our golden rule was that the can-dos had to be within the context of specific business skills AND easily understood by a department manager with no knowledge of language training.

Can you give me an example?

Chris:  Sure. These two statements contributed to one of the can-dos related to participating in meetings at a B1 level:

  1. Sociolinguistic appropriateness at CEFR B: Is aware of the salient politeness conventions and acts appropriately.
  2. Grammar at CEFR B1: Uses reasonably accurately a repertoire of frequently used “routines” and patterns (usually associated with more predictable situations).

Our Business English can-do statement for B1 Meetings: I can directly ask a participant to clarify what they have just said and obtain more detailed information in an appropriate manner.

How long did the whole process take?

Chris:  It took five months to write, test, rewrite, test and rewrite again. We then needed to repeat the process with a German language version too. At the end we blind-tested it with the client, and were delighted with their feedback.  The roll-out took a few months. Today, internally, it’s still an ongoing project. As new trainers join the company, they need to learn how to use the tool to its full potential.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

The Business English Can-Do Statements toolbox also has a short FAQ and 4 ideas on how you can use them. If you’d like to know more, please contact us, or read more about the CEFR framework on our website.

What our clients learned the easy way

Long gone are the days when Business English training consisted of weekly lessons with a native English speaker, discussing what you did over the weekend. (Hooray!) In 2017 A.D, companies are paying more and more attention to the effectiveness of their Business English training programs. HR departments look for a training solution that delivers business results, based on the needs of the employees. A solution that ties in with the organization’s strategic goals. We are proud to have almost 25 years experience in this field. From concept to implementation to measuring results, we’ve learned a thousand lessons along the way, and so have our clients. In an effort to help you find the right solution for your department or company, we asked our clients what they realized three months after investing in results-oriented training that they hadn’t realized before. With some added links and examples from me, here are the three things we heard most often:



Go to the eBook

hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘3c442819-7f59-4039-bc15-472ccbbefef5’, {});


Set concrete training goals

The most successful training happens when the participants have specific goals. A good needs analysis as well as input from managers help set these. Look for tangible business results, this will help you set your short- and long term goals. And, the more specific the goal, the better. For example: ‘Improving emails in English’ is a good start but ‘Handling billing requests from Indian colleagues via email’ is better.

The effectiveness of on-the-job training

People learn 70% by doing, and only 10% through structured training. Allowing the training to be job-focused, and on an “as and when needed” basis produces learning that sticks. A training solution that integrates on-the-job support is highly effective. And, on-the-job training is extremely flexible. For example: It can be used for email coaching, telephone conference/meeting shadowing and feedback, presentation practice and feedback, etc. It allows the trainer to learn first-hand how participants use English at work.

The importance of OTJ – a brief interjection: On-the-job support makes the training useful because it directly targets the training needs of the participant. Our on-the-job training and shadowing solutions are at the heart of the Target Training cycle and a core element of our InCorporate Trainer programs.

Forget about language levels and test scores

These results can’t be translated into how someone has transferred their knowledge to the workplace. If performance in English has improved, the training is successful. Measuring knowledge and language (CEF) levels can be useful as an indicator but it isn’t very practical, nor is it always realistic in a corporate training program. For example: It can take 700 hours of training or more for an A1 (beginner) to reach a B1 (intermediate) level. This type of time investment isn’t possible for most working professionals, nor is it (always) in alignment with the organizational goals.

Final interjection: A chain of evidence is created with Kirkpatrick evaluation model, showing how much training contributes directly towards business goals..

FOR MORE INFORMATION

You can always ask us your questions how to implement a successful business English training program. We’re quite good at it, ask anyone… Or start here:

 

Stepping into management: the learning and development journey

One of the drawbacks of being a trainer is that now and again you fail to realise that what is obvious for you is new to others. In a recent young managers program the “eureka” moment came when, following a young manager’s “Maybe I’m not cut out for this job”  statement, I shared the Conscious Competence model”.  The model, developed by Noel Burch, has been around since the 1970s – and it’s a great way to prepare for and reflect on your development as a manager (or development in any other role).  I assumed my participants knew the model already but they had never heard of it. This is a quick recap.




eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘20407acd-ee86-4017-b4b3-d7bf14527aaa’, {});


Stage 1 – Unconscious Incompetence

Ignorance is bliss, and you don’t even realize that you are performing poorly. As a new, young manager perhaps you don’t even realize you are making elementary mistakes. Instead of delegating you are dumping tasks on people and walk away convinced you are empowering them to find their own solutions. Perhaps your tasking is incomplete, or maybe you don’t have clear goals because you didn’t consider this your role.  Are you delaying giving feedback because you don’t want to upset anybody and it will sort itself out anyway – or perhaps the way you give feedback is so clumsy you demotivate somebody.  The list goes on and on. You assume you know what y0u’re doing –  it’s more or less the same as before but with the better desk and more benefits. You’re not aware that you don’t have the necessary skill. Perhaps you don’t even realize that the skill is relevant.  In the first stage, your confidence exceeds your management skills. Before you can move to the next step you need to know and accept that certain skills are relevant to the role of manager, and that mastering this skill will make you more effective.

Stage 2 – Conscious Incompetence

Someone helped you understand that you need to develop a new skill. Or, you have been sent on a management training programme and your eyes have been opened. Or perhaps confronted by poor results you’ve actually  taken a step back and reflected on what’s been going on and the role you’ve played. You are aware of your lack of skills. You are consciously incompetent. This is a difficult phase as you are now aware of your weaknesses, or in today’s insipid jargon your “developmental areas”.

Nobody is born a manager, although some people may well have innate skills, making the transition to manager easier. Learning by feedback, learning by suffering, learning by doing and learning by failing – these things brought you to the second stage. Training can play a role as can learning from your peers and exposing yourself to opportunities to learn. By staying positive and embracing the small successes your confidence in your own management abilities grows.

 

Stage 3 – Conscious Competence

At this stage you have learnt some reliable management techniques and processes, but they have to be consciously implemented.  It’s a bit like painting by numbers. You know how to facilitate a meeting well, but you still want to take time to reflect on the steps beforehand.  You can make a great presentation and get your message across … and you know what you need to do in advance to get the success you need. You can provide feedback in an appropriate manner – but not without thinking it through beforehand. At this stage, your ability to be flexible and proactive in unexpected situations is limited – but you can do it. The task-oriented aspects of managing are becoming fine-tuned but it is still learning by doing, trial and error, or copying managerial role models. You are testing your limits.

Stage 4 – Unconscious Competence

Quite simply you have become what you wanted to be –  a skilled manager. The task and relationship aspects of managing are now “part of you”.  You know how to achieve the task, develop individuals and build a team – and can do it without too much thinking. Non-routine situations are challenging, yet do not faze you. You are like Beckenbauer in football, or Federer in tennis. You always appear to have enough time and space to make good decisions. But even masters can lose matches and need to learn and practise.

To summarize

The model can be universally applied as a model for learning. It suggests that you are initially unaware of how little you know – you simply don’t know what you don’t know. As you recognize your incompetence, you acquire a skill consciously, then learn to use that skill. Over time, the skill becomes a part of you. You can utilize it consciously thought through. When that happens you have acquired unconscious competence.

  • It will help you understand that stepping into a management role is a learning journey -and not an instant enlightenment.
  • It reinforces that rank does not automatically give you authority.
  • It reassures you that you can succeed as a manager. You just need space and time to find your feet.
  • Understanding this dynamic and learning basic management techniques will quickly help you overcome the early frustrations.

And finally you can manage your emotion as you develop.  You are going through a well-known learning process.  Nobody is born a manager!

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Read more about the model (this article suggests a fifth stage and has a matrix to clarify the four stages). And finally, a few blog posts you might be interested in:

 

10 easy steps you can take to kick-start your learning in 2017

The idea of new year resolutions isn’t a modern invention. The Babylonians and Romans both made promises to their gods at the start of a new year. Whether or not you are making resolutions, the start of a new year does bring new opportunities for you to refocus on learning new skills and building knowledge.  There’s no right or wrong way to do this, but here are 10 proven and practical steps you can take to help get your learning off on the right track in 2017.  And here’s the good news …. you don’t need to necessarily do them all! If you try just a couple, you’ll see the benefits by the end of the year.




The big (free) eBook of negotiations language




1. Set realistic goals

Take half an hour to think about what you really want to learn, develop, improve, and why. Now write those goals down so you have something to refer back to reflect on. Whether it be improving your vocabulary in a foreign language, overcoming presentation stress  or learning to play the drums: SMART GOALS HELP!

2. Find options for achieving these goals

If you want to improve your writing skills, how are you going to do that? Use an app, attend a course? Do your research and find options that are going to work for you – and try to get the ball rolling sooner than later. It’ll be summer before you know it.

3. Get social

Talk to people about their goals and what they’re doing to get there. How are they learning? And what can you learn from them? And share your goals too.

4. Eat small bites

Micro-learning is one of the learning & development trends for 2017. The great thing about this is that it acknowledges the time issue we all have. Training can now happen in bite-sized chunks that literally take no more than 5 minutes at a time – that means you can learn something very quickly without having to make major changes to your routines and schedules. There are micro-learning solutions for most areas, including business English.

5. Get organized

If you’re learning anything new, it helps to organize yourself. That could be organizing your notes, your time, and setting priorities. Take the time to consider what works for you.

6.  Experiment

According to the 70-20-10 learning model 10% of learning happens in formal training situations, 20% happens through social interaction, and 70% happens on-the-job. On-the-job means in practical, real situations. So, if you’re learning something, you need to experiment in real situations. Look for opportunities to do this.

7. Learn from your mistakes

If you experiment, you’re going to make mistakes. Don’t worry about that, it’s part of the learning process. Just make sure you actually take the time to reflect on what went wrong and what needs to happen differently the next time round. And then do it differently.

8. Enjoy yourself

The best learning happens when it’s so much fun, you don’t even realize you’re learning. What do you enjoy doing in your free time? Choose learning options that fit in with how you would normally be spending your time. That could be watching a movie, listening to a podcast, reading a book, or playing a game on your tablet.

9. Notice your progress

If you write down your goals, and review them regularly, you’ll see the progress you’re making. It also helps if you can begin to notice the small events that show that learning is happening.

10. Celebrate your results

And when you notice those small events, celebrate and reward yourself. When we ask participants to build transfer plans at the end of a seminar we ask a number of questions, “What? How? By when? Who else needs to be involved? What does success look like?” AND “How will you reward yourself?”. It could be as simple as holding off on buying a new book or as grand as buying concert tickets and taking your daughter.

Overcoming the 4 core obstacles that prevent intentions turning into action

Whether they be new year resolutions or not, our plans and intentions often fail to materialize due to a lack of specificity, vision, accountability, and discipline. To overcome these 4 obstacles …

  • Define what you want to achieve as clearly as possible (see step 1 below)
  • Consider what success looks like – and then ask yourself if you are really doing all you can to make your vision come true
  • As well as holding yourself accountable, set up a “buddy system” in order to stick to your resolutions. Avoiding embarrassment can be a great motivator (see step 3) -although some research does argue that sharing goals actually widens the intention-behavior gap.
  • Stick to your goals and your plans, and don’t make excuses.  The more you practice discipline, the more disciplined you become. When you do slip, rather than making excuses, think of ways to do it next time should you happen to come across a similar obstacle.

Good luck and have fun learning!