Business English blog articles

How to avoid your emails going viral

“Worst email ever?”  was the headline that got my attention when I read my newspaper on a Saturday morning. The story was about an Australian manager who had sent an email which he later described himself as a “Gordon Ramsay meets Donald Trump-style email rant”.  His email went viral on Twitter (#bossoftheyear) and the story was an online sensation for a couple of days. 

Although, or maybe because, we send and receive countless emails every day it is sometimes easy to forget some of the golden rules of email etiquette. To give the manager his dues he later apologized to his staff (“It seems I am becoming an online sensation for how NOT to communicate – and in hindsight I agree!!”), but his story is a timely reminder to review some important dos and don’ts for emailing. Starting with the most important one, here are six tips for you to consider…

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

Tip 1 – Don’t send emails when you are angry / frustrated/ tired etc

This is, and always will be, the first rule of email communication. In “Writing emails that people read”, our most downloaded ebook with 18,000 downloads to date, we suggest you write the whole email if it will make you feel better and help you to get some-thing out of your system – BUT only add the recipients and send it after you have had space and time to reflect and think about what you are sending and its potential impact. Rule #2 builds on this by emphasizing that email is great for giving information, sharing updates or making simple requests. However, use the phone if something could be a sensitive or emotional topic. When it comes to management communication, in our Practical Toolbox for Managers training we also suggest that emotional communication is done face-to-face, via Webex or over the phone. Email just doesn’t help … although you might feel better for a few minutes.

As the Australian manger himself later said, he sent it “in a moment of seeing red and it most definitely should not have happened”.

Tip 2 – Watch your tone, mind your language

Emails need to be respectful and clear. Body language, facial expressions and tone of voice cannot be communicated by email. How an email sounds and the message it sends are determined only by the words that we use. Read this blog post if you want to learn more about tone in emails. Make sure that your message is respectful and clear. In his viral email the manager knew he’d misjudged this and later wrote “Obviously some of you know me pretty well and know I shoot from the hip, but obviously others don’t”.

New Call-to-action

Tip 3 – Get the person’s name right

This is a very personal tip for me. I get a lot of emails from French contacts and probably 20% start with Hi Taylor (my first name is Ian). When you type the recipient’s name in the “To” line or select them from your address book – make sure it’s the right person. (In 2000, a British schoolgirl was on the receiving end of inappropriate business emails after a US naval commander accidentally added her to his confidential mailing list.) Be sure that the name you use at the beginning of the mail is the name of the person in the address line and that you have spelt it correctly.

Tip 4 – KISS: Keep it short and simple

Everybody is busy and everybody gets a lot of emails.  The average number of emails received per day in 2018 is 97!  If each email takes just 2 minutes to read and deal with this is 3 hours of your day done already!

New Call-to-action

5 typische Fehler beheben, die deutschsprachige Personen auf Englisch machen.

Deutsche sprechen in der Regel gutes Business Englisch. In einer von Harvard Business Review veröffentlichten weltweiten Studie belegte Deutschland den 14. Platz für die Kompetenz der englischen Mitarbeiter (oder “hoch” mit 60,2 von 100 Punkten). In einer weiteren Studie gaben 100% der befragten deutschen Arbeitgeber an, dass Englischkenntnisse für ihr Unternehmen von Bedeutung sind. Solche Beweise zeigen, warum die Deutschen zu Recht stolz auf ihre Englischkenntnisse sind – und die überwiegende Mehrheit der Deutschen, mit denen wir zusammenarbeiten, will noch besser werden. Wenn Ihre Muttersprache Deutsch ist und Sie Ihr Englisch bei der Arbeit verbessern möchten, könnte es für Sie frustrierend sein, dass Ihre englischsprachigen Kollegen Sie nicht korrigieren. Schließlich kann man nicht besser werden, wenn man nicht weiß, was man falsch macht! In diesem Beitrag werfen wir einen Blick auf eine Handvoll deutschsprachiger Fehler, die im Business Englisch wirklich häufig vorkommen. Die gute Nachricht? Sie sind wirklich einfach zu beheben.
New Call-to-action

1. “We discussed about last month’s figures at the meeting.”

Auf Englisch diskutieren wir nicht über (about) etwas. Um das zu beheben, lassen Sie das about hinter dem Verb discuss weg. Der richtige englische Satz lautet also: “We discussed last month’s figures at the meeting.” Beachten Sie, dass Sie about nach dem Substantiv discussions verwenden können, wie in “There were discussions about last month’s figures at the meeting”.

2. “Good morning together.”

Dies ist eine direkte Übersetzung einer schönen (und effizienten) deutschen Art, alle gleichzeitig zu begrüßen. Together ist zu 100% logisch, aber es funktioniert im Englischen nicht. Wie kannst du es beheben? Wie im letzten Beispiel: Lassen Sie es komplett raus. Der richtige englische Satz lautet einfach “Good morning”. Sie können auch Alternativen wie “Good morning everyone” oder “Morning all” (ugs.) nutzen.

3. “We see us tomorrow.”

Dies ist auch eine Direktübersetzung aus dem Deutschen. Wir haben keinen identischen Satz auf Englisch, also klingt es zwar verständlich, aber seltsam auf Englisch. In diesem Fall müssen Sie einen anderen Ausdruck verwenden. Der korrekte englische Satz lautet also: “We’ll see each other tomorrow”. Sie können auch “See you tomorrow.” order “Look forward to seeing you tomorrow.” verwenden.

4. “I visit normally on Thursdays my clients in Bamberg.”

Die Wortfolge ist deutsch. Der Satz ist 100% verständlich, aber er klingt im Englischen einfach falsch (ebenso wie, wenn Englisch sprechende Personen Deutsch sprechen, kann es zwar verständlich, aber grammatikalisch falsch sein). Adverbien der Häufigkeit (Wörter wie: normally, sometimes, always, never) kommen fast immer zwischen der Person (I) und dem Verb (visit). Der richtige englische Satz lautet also: “I normally visit my clients in Bamberg on Thursdays.

5. “I work since five years by my company.”

Es gibt hier nur 8 Wörter, aber eigentlich sind 4 Fehler in diesem Satz.

  1. Die Zeitform (work) ist falsch.
  2. Man kann das Wort since nicht mit einer Zeitspanne kombinieren.
  3. By ist nicht die richtige Präposition.
  4. Die Wortfolge ist deutsch.

So beheben Sie es:

  • Wenn etwas in der Vergangenheit begonnen hat, jetzt geschieht und wahrscheinlich auch in Zukunft weitergehen wird, dann verwenden wir in der Regel die present perfect simple oder continuous Form, z. B. I have worked / I have been working…
  • Wir verwenden since für einem Zeitpunkt, und for für einem Zeitraum. z. B. since 2012/ for 5 years.
  • Es gibt nur sehr wenige konkrete Regeln für Präpositionen. Du musst also ein Gefühl für sie entwickeln und sie in einem Kontext erlernen. Auf Englisch sagen wir “We work for a company”.
  • Wortfolge. Dies ist ähnlich wie beim letzten Beispiel – eine Zeitangabe kommt üblicherweise an das Ende eines Satzes im Englischen.

Der richtige englische Satz lautet also: “I have been working for my company for five years.”

Wenn Sie mehr Übung wünschen, dann schauen Sie sich unser aktuelles Ebook an: “Common English mistakes (Germans make) and how to correct them”.

test

Business English training: on-the-job training (for the job)

On-the-job (OTJ) training has been a cornerstone in our approach to in-house Business English training since our first InCorporate Trainers started their jobs (one of them was Scott Levey). When we explain the concept of on-the-job training to potential clients, they “understand” what we’re saying … BUT …they don’t really “get” how effective and beneficial on-the-job training is until they have seen it in action. This post aims to explain what it is, how it works, and how participants benefit, using some non-specific examples of on-the-job training.

New Call-to-action

The benefits of on-the-job training

OTJ training is highly effective because the training takes place alongside and as part of your daily work. The trainer uses your work situations (your emails, your virtual meetings, your plant tours) as the basis for your learning. On-the-job training takes place at work, while you are working. This brings two huge benefits.

  1. You maximize your time because you are benefiting from training while you are working.
  2. You can directly transfer what you learn to your job. Your training is completely based on a real and concrete task. Everything you learn is relevant.

If you are familiar with the 70-20-10 model, you’ll know that 70% of learning comes through “doing” and from “experience”. Learning while you work is highly effective and this is the heart of on-the-job training.

“I helped Hans to de-escalate a situation in Supply Chain Management. Hans felt that the American party was wound-up and overly difficult. Hans brainstormed phrases with my help and he wrote a draft email. I helped him improve the structure and tone of the email and suggested he rewrote some of his sentences in plain English. A few hours later, the American party positively replied and the whole thing was solved by the time Hans went home.”

What exactly is on-the-job training and how does it work?

With on-the-job training, the trainer is there when you need assistance in preparing emails, specifications, manuals, reports, slides and other documentation. The trainer can support you in the planning, writing and reviewing stage. The trainer is also available to you for preparing meetings, phone calls, web meetings, teleconferences, presentations and negotiations.  They can then shadow you in action and provide personalized and situationally-based feedback.

On-the-job training focuses on your priorities at work and on you improving your business English in those areas. It can be

  • reactive where you ask the trainer for help “Can you help me improve these slides?”
  • proactive where the trainer encourages you to share work you have done/are doing in English “I heard you are involved in writing the R-Spec for the new project. How can I support you?”

“One of my participants, a product manager, had to deliver two presentations in English. It was basically the same presentation, but for two different audiences.  Observing her in our first practice session, I made a note of language points to work on. We worked on these, and a few other things (key messages, adapting messages to different audiences, Q&A session) over the next week. She delivered the presentations to me again, already with much more confidence and fluency – and then she practised with a few colleagues in a weekly group session and benefitted from both their positive feedback and the confidence boost.  Finally, I watched her deliver from the back and she did great.  After the presentations we debriefed and I shared my feedback (what went really well, what would she like to focus more on next time etc) . She was too critical of her performance and I helped her to be realistic about what she needs to focus on.”

What on-the-job training isn’t

What the trainer does not do is write the email/document for you (where’s the learning in that?). One common misconception is that on-the-job trainers are translators or proof readers. They’re not, in the same way that translators and proof readers aren’t trainers. Collaborative proof reading and translation can be an option, but the ownership needs to stay with the learner.

Another misconception is that on-the-job training is traditional “classroom training” during work time. The trainer will certainly use the “insider” view and what they have seen on-the-job to tailor traditional “off the job” training. This means your group training, coaching, 1-1 training, and seminars are closer to your workplace and that the transfer of learning is smoother.  But “on the job” training is learning while actually doing. There’s a good example of how this looks in action in an R&D department here.

“Three of my participants had written a 300-page instruction manual and they came to me with the request to help them improve it. Nobody in their department understood it enough to successfully use the system that it was meant to explain. I told them I would read it. Oh boy. We worked on writing with the reader in mind, structuring documents to make them scannable and writing in plain English. Visuals replaced paragraphs and we even created a few video tutorials too.  Four weeks later, they produced a second manual. Over one hundred pages lighter, it was clear, comprehensive, mistake free, and written in a style that everyone could understand, even me. As a result, the system that was supposed to make everyone’s job easier made everyone’s job easier.”

Bringing on-the-job training to life

We sign confidentiality agreements with our clients. Even when we don’t, we wouldn’t use their actual documentation online, so these examples are non-specific and Hans is not really called Hans … she’s called XXXX.

If you would like to know more about the benefits of this approach, don’t hesitate to contact us.

The Four Horsemen: contempt and stonewalling in the workplace

Healthy and respectful working relationships are a must if you want an effective and enjoyable workplace.  In the first post of this series, I introduced John Gottmann’s work on the 4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse. In the second post, we looked at what you can do to tackle the toxic behaviours of criticizing & blaming and defensiveness. This blog post will dive deeper into the last 2 toxic behaviours – and possibly the most damaging of the 4: stonewalling & contempt. We’ll explore why they happen, their impact and how both parties can change things for the better.  We’ll end with what a manger can do when they see these behaviours within their teams.

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

Contempt

Contempt is when somebody makes it clear that they feel somebody has no value and deserves no respect. As it has been built brick-by-brick over time, it is tough to dismantle, and is probably the most destructive behaviour amongst Gottman’s “Four Horsemen”.

Contempt can manifest itself as ongoing sarcasm, cynicism, insults and aggressive, belittling or mocking humour. It can be seen in small gestures (eye-rolling when a colleague starts talking in a meeting, snorting at the mention of a project, a smirk or a single “hah” when a  colleagues name is mentioned) to full on mocking and cruel statements e.g. “Wow, you’ve done better than I ever expected – even by your standards that’s truly great work Susanne. You must be exhausted after having made so many mistakes”.

When somebody shows contempt, they are actually communicating that they see themselves as better and worth more.

Why do we do show contempt?

Feelings of contempt are typically built up over time – negative experiences create their own story and, too often, nobody has tackled the situation effectively. This can leave a person feeling frustrated and angry and looking to establish some sort of “superiority”.  Contempt can also come from a sense of moral superiority based on class, cultural or religious differences. Peers can feed into it or enable it.

What happens when we show contempt?

Contempt destroys teams and relationships. It prevents trust and respect and makes it hard for any real human warmth. It is tangibly damaging, causes stress and can harm people emotionally, mentally and ultimately physically.

So, what can the person showing contempt do differently?

Truth be told, if you are showing contempt for others there is a good chance you no longer care about turning things around. However, if you have a high level of self-awareness and realise that you have become somebody you don’t want to be then this is already a great step. Going forward you can focus on redefining your relationship with your colleague through …

  • seeing the other person as a human being with equal value.
  • seeking a positive trait in them and acknowledge it first to yourself and then to the other.
  • finding something they do that you value – then tell them.
  • communicating your needs with “I” statements and not “you” statements e.g. “I feel…”, “I want…”
  • actively looking to find opportunities to make deposits in their “emotional bank account”.

And what can the person receiving contempt do to limit the toxic impact and turn things around?

  • Look after yourself and work to stay balanced and neutral when interacting with this person. Shut out the unhelpful “whatever I do will be seen as wrong” self- talk. Reward yourself for not feeding into a situation.
  • People don’t always realize that they are being offensive… or how offensive they are being. Raise awareness of behaviours in a neutral / inquiring tone e.g. “What would you like to achieve by saying that?”, “Why are you rolling your eyes?”
  • Ask questions about the other’s intent – especially if they are not communicating in their first language. e.g. “Are you aware that, when I hear you say … I feel …?” “
  • Reflect how the contemptuous behaviour is impacting you e.g. “I feel belittled when you roll your eyes when I talk. Is this intended?”
  • Say how you feel about what is going on and show your desire to make things right, e.g. “Can we take a step back and slow things down?” “Insulting me isn’t helping us to move forward and find a solution”, “ What is the best way to tackle this issue for both of us?”
  • Indicate that you are willing to move beyond the present and press the reset button e.g. “I feel we are struggling. How about we try and start again from the beginning and build a new working relationship?”
  • And when things get too much, don’t be afraid to seek support within your organization. When you do this focus on you and your feelings… and not what they said/did.
  • And finally, know where your limits are and seek support from your manager or HR if you feel these are being crossed.

Stonewalling                     

When somebody feels they are frequently and undeservedly being blamed or treated with contempt, they may choose to withdraw into themselves and give one-word answers or even refuse to participate at all. Discussion, healthy questioning and positive conflict are key elements of any successful team.  Stonewalling stops this from happening, and feeds contempt, defensiveness and blaming.

Why do we do stonewall?

By refusing to cooperate, engage, react or communicate we look to protect ourselves and ride it out. Beneath this we may be seeking to control or establish hierarchy e.g. “I don’t need to listen to you”.

What happens when we do this?

The impact is that communication stops. The other person may become increasingly frustrated, angry and then despondent. Communication collapses and relationships quickly collapse too. Other colleagues get pulled in to the toxic situation as they become impacted, and everything gets slower and tougher … meaning ultimately performance and results suffer.

So, what can the “stonewaller” do differently?

If you recognize this behaviour in yourself and want to change you can…

  • focus on who you choose to be – who am I really? How do I want to behave?  How do I behave when I am at my best?
  • ask for space if you need it, and commit to resume once things have calmed down.
  • find a way to calm your emotions. Is there a third party you can express your feelings to? Alternatively, verbalize them out loud to yourself (or write them down if you prefer).
  • work out why you have reached this point. Why are you so angry and reluctant to contribute? Answering these questions may help you to understand your feelings better and enable you to continue.
  • avoid righteous indignation e.g. “ I don’t have to take this anymore” or seeing yourself as an innocent victim

And what can the “stonewalled” do to limit the toxic impact?

  • Ask yourself why are they stonewalling? What are you doing/have you done that is making the other person not feel safe in expressing themselves?
  • Focus on building safety. Agree a fixed time, neutral and private location, confidentiality and help them come back into the conversation with simple exploratory open questions.
  • Accept that a break might be needed and press the “pause” button while communicating that you are committed to continuing the conversation later.
  • Really listen to what the other person is saying.

What can a manager do when they see contempt and stonewalling within their team?

The hard truth is that as a manager you probably won’t be able to do as much as you might like to.  Whereas a skilled manager can actively help team members get past criticizing, blaming and being defensive, contempt and stonewalling are far more difficult to deal with. In fact, any blog would struggle to explore the variables and options.  Here are some questions to ask yourself…

  • What is the impact of the behaviour on the team and our results?
  • What can I accept? What can’t I accept? Where is my line in the sand?
  • Where is the contempt or stonewalling coming from? e.g. why this person? this situation? this environment?
  • How willing am I to reflect back what I am seeing? The impact it is having? And the impact it may have later?
  • Am I prepared and committed to consistently confront contemptuous or stonewalling behaviors over the long-term?
  • To what extent can I ring-fence a person without impacting the team or passing more work and responsibility on to others?
  • Am I choosing to do nothing? Or am I afraid to do something?
  • Who else can help me in this situation?
  • To what extent has HR been involved so far? What can they do?
  • Under what circumstances am I prepared to let this person go?

Whether you are just moving into a management position, managing a conflict in your virtual team, or just want to get the very best from your staff and the teams you manage, being aware of Gottmann’s work on the 4 Horsemen of the Apocalypse is incredibly useful and practical. At the end of the day, results are delivered through people and people are complex. None of us are always at our best and we can all struggle in relationships.  Awareness of the 4 Horsemen is a start, followed by self-reflection and support.  An effective manager is neither a counsellor nor a buddy – but they do need to manage people as individuals – and this means managing knowledge, skills, attitudes and behaviours.

10 weitere sportliche Redewendungen, die Sie in Business Meetings hören werden.

Im vergangenen Jahr haben wir eine Liste von 10 gängigen amerikanischen Sport Redewendungen zusammengestellt, die von unseren Kunden und Lesern gut aufgenommen wurden.  Da der Blog-Post so beliebt war, wollten wir noch weitere Sportbegriffe teilen, die Sie im Büro hören können…

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

to take a rain check

Aus dem Baseball, es bedeutet: “Ich kann jetzt nicht, aber machen wir es ein anderes Mal.’.  “Thanks for the invite to happy hour, but can I take a rain check?  I need to get home for dinner with my family.”

a Hail Mary pass

Aus dem American Football, was soviel bedeutet wie “ein verzweifelter Versuch in letzter Minute, etwas zu schaffen”. “We offered the client a 15% reduction in price as a Hail Mary to win their business.”

to touch base (with someone)

Aus dem Baseball, was soviel bedeutet wie “mit jemandem in Kontakt treten”. “Can you touch base with Chester next week to see how he is doing with the forecast numbers?”

a front runner

Aus dem Pferderennen: “die Person, die führend ist, aber noch nicht gewonnen hat”. “I think we are the front runner for the winning the account, but XYZ’s offer was also very strong.”

the ball is in (someone’s) court

Aus dem Tennis: “Es ist jemand an der Reihe, Maßnahmen zu ergreifen oder den nächsten Zug zu machen”. . “I received an offer for a new job.  The ball is now in my court to ask for more money or decline it.”

the home stretch

Aus dem Pferderennsport, d.h.’kurz vor dem Ende sein’ oder ‘in der letzten Phase oder Etappe zu sein’.  “This has certainly been a challenging project, but we are now in the home stretch so let’s stay focussed and keep on schedule.”

to get the ball rolling

Aus Ballsportarten: “etwas anfangen”.. “OK, now we’re all here for today’s meeting let’s get the ball rolling. Heinz, can you start with an update on ….”

to keep your eye on the ball

Aus Ballsportarten: “wachsam, auf der Hut sein”. “We have worked with this client before and we know that they can be chaotic. We need to keep our eyes on the ball, especially when it comes to safety on site.

par for the course

Aus dem Golf, was soviel bedeutet wie “etwas Normales oder Erwartetes”.  ‘Jim was late for the meeting again today.  That is par for the course with him.’

to strike out

Aus dem Baseball: bei etwas zu versagen.  ‘I have tried to get a meeting with the Head of Purchasing 5 times but have struck out each time.’

Virtuelles Training vs. Präsenztraining: Wie sieht es im Vergleich aus?

James Culver ist Partner der Target Training Gmbh und verfügt über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Entwicklung maßgeschneiderter Trainingslösungen. Er war in seinen beruflichen Stationen ein HR Training Manager, ein Major der US Army National Guard und ein Dozent an der International School of Management. Er ist auch ein talentierter Perkussionist und Geschichtenerzähler. Im letzten Teil dieser Serie von Blog-Posts über die Durchführung von virutellem Training beantwortete er die folgenden Fragen…

New Call-to-action

Sie verfügen über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Durchführung von Schulungen. Seit wann bieten Sie virtuelles Training an?

James Seit den 90er Jahren. In den Vereinigten Staaten haben wir sehr früh mit der virtuellen Vortragsweise im Community College-System begonnen. Wir hatten oft  kleine Gruppen von Studenten an abgelegeneren Standorten, die dennoch die Vorteile von Kursen nutzen wollten, die wir auf dem Hauptcampus anbieten würden, also begannen wir, virtuelle Schulungen anzubieten. Als ich anfing, mit virtuellem Training zu arbeiten, war es extrem teuer, einen Teil dieser Arbeit zu erledigen. Unser System war im Grunde genommen eine Kameraeinrichtung und der Professor oder der Trainer sprach nur mit der Kamera. Es gab nur sehr wenig Interaktion mit den anderen Standorten und es war wie eine Art TV- Schule.

Wie sehen Sie den Vergleich von virtuellem Training zu fact-to-face Training?

James Es gibt wahrscheinlich zwei Dinge, über die man nachdenken sollte. Eines ist der Inhalt, den man vorträgt und das andere ist der Kontext. Mit Kontext meine ich alles, was den Inhalt umgibt. Wie die Dinge gemacht werden, wer mit wem interagiert und wie sie interagieren – das Gros der Kommunikation. Was den Inhalt betrifft, so sind das behandelte Thema und die geteilten Informationen auf virtueller und persönlicher Ebene gut zu vergleichen. Tatsächlich sind die virtuellen Plattformen, die wir bei Target Training einsetzen, maßgeschneidert für die Bereitstellung vieler Inhalte auf interessante Weise. Es ist sehr einfach, Videos, Aufnahmen, Whiteboards usw. hinzuzufügen. Wenn wir zum Beispiel Inhalte haben, die auf einem Slide vorbereitet und den Leuten zur Verfügung gestellt werden, können sie diese kommentieren, Fragen stellen usw. Das ist auf einer virtuellen Plattform wirklich sehr einfach..

Was meistens schwieriger ist, ist alles, was damit zu tun hat, im selben Raum wie jemand anderes zu sein: Gesichtsausdruck ändern, Körpersprache ändern. Wir sehen oder bekommen das oft nicht in einer virtuellen Umgebung mit, selbst mit den marktführenden Systemen. Die Herausforderung als Trainer besteht darin, einen großen Teil der Informationen zu verlieren, die wir von den Teilnehmern eines klassischen Präsenztrainings erhalten würden. Das ist eine harte Nuss. Als Trainer im Präsenztraining habe ich ein Gefühl dafür, wie es läuft, weil ich im Raum bin. Es ist viel schwieriger, ein Gefühl dafür zu haben, wie es läuft, wenn man sich in einer virtuellen Umgebung befindet. Und du brauchst dieses “Gefühl”, damit du dich anpassen und den Teilnehmern die bestmögliche Lernerfahrung bieten kannst..

Welche Workaround-Strategien gibt es dafür?

James Es gibt Workaround-Strategien und durch externe und interne Schulungen und On-the-job-Erfahrungen nutzen unsere Trainer diese. Eine Strategie ist, dass man viele offene und geschlossene “Check-Fragen” stellen muss. Fragen wie “Bist du bei mir”, “Ist das klar?”, “Was sind also die Kernpunkte, die du daraus ableitest”, “Was sind deine bisherigen Fragen?” Erfahrene virtuelle Trainer werden diese Art von Fragen alle 2 bis 3 Minuten stellen.  Im Wesentlichen hat ein Trainer ein Zeitlimit von 2 bis 3 Minuten für seinen Input, bevor er eine Check-Frage stellen sollte. Die Check-Fragen sollten sowohl offen für die Gruppe als auch für eine Einzelperson bestimmt sein.

Welche Schulungsthemen eignen sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise und welche nicht?

James Die Themen, die sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise eignen, sind diejenigen, die stärker auf Inhalte ausgerichtet sind – zum Beispiel klassische Präsentationsfähigkeiten oder virtuell ausgeführte Präsentationen.  Diese Art von Trainingslösungen konzentrieren sich auf Input, Tipps, Do’s und Don’ts, Best Practice Sharing und dann Praxis – Feedback – Praxis – Feedback etc..

Another theme that works very well for us when delivered virtually is virtual team training, whether it be working in virtual teams or leading virtual teams. By their very nature, virtual teams are dispersed so the virtual delivery format fits naturally. Plus, you are training them using the tools they need to master themselves. And of course, another benefit is if the training is for a specific virtual team the shared training experience strengthens the team itself.

Ein weiteres Thema, das für uns virtuell sehr gut funktioniert, ist das virtuelle Teamtraining, sei es in virtuellen Teams oder bei der Leitung virtueller Teams. Virtuelle Teams sind naturgemäß so verteilt, dass das virtuelle Übertragungsformat auf natürliche Weise passt. Außerdem trainieren Sie sie mit den Werkzeugen, die sie später selbst beherrschen sollten. Und natürlich ist ein weiterer Vorteil: Das Training für ein bestimmtes virtuelles Team, stärkt die gemeinsame Trainingserfahrung des Teams.

Die Arten von Trainingslösungen, die virtuell eine größere Herausforderung darstellen, sind diejenigen, bei denen wir versuchen, uns selbst oder andere zu verändern. Themen wie Durchsetzungsfähigkeit oder effektiveres Arbeiten müssen sorgfältig durchdacht und entwickelt werden, wenn sie mehr als ein Informationsdepot sein sollen. Hier ist der Coaching-Aspekt weitaus wichtiger.

Schließlich, und vielleicht überraschenderweise, kann das Management- und Führungstraining wirklich gut funktionieren, wenn es virtuell durchgeführt wird. Unsere Lösung Hochleistung zu erzielen ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür. Das Geheimnis dabei ist, das kleine Lernen zu betonen, zusätzliche Ressourcen außerhalb der Sitzung bereitzustellen, z.B. umgedrehter Unterricht (flipped classroom) mit relevanten Videos und Artikeln, und auch Möglichkeiten für Einzelgespräche zu bieten.

Virtuelle Meetings: Dos and Don’ts

Stellen Sie sicher, dass Ihre virtuellen Meetings produktiv sind

Virtuelle Meetings können manchmal knifflig sein. Sind sie eher wie ein Telefonat oder ein persönliches Treffen? Nun, sie sind eine Kombination aus beidem und sollten unterschiedlich behandelt werden. Hier sind einige schnelle und einfache “Dos and Don’ts” für virtuelle Meetings.

New Call-to-action

Virtuelle Meetings: “Dos”

  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass alle Beteiligten, die für die Erreichung der Ziele von wesentlicher Bedeutung sind, anwesend sind – ansonsten vereinbaren Sie einen neuen Termin.
  • Seien Sie flexibel mit der Besprechungszeit damit Mitarbeiter in anderen Zeitzonen ebenfalls teilnehmen können.
  • Erstellen Sie eine Agenda, die die Ziele des Meetings beschreibt.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass die Besprechungspunkte/Prioritäten/Zeiten mit den Besprechungszielen übereinstimmen.
  • Sagen Sie ein regelmäßig stattfindendes Meeting ab, wenn Sie der Meinung sind, dass die Zeit besser anderweitig genutzt werden könnte.
  • Senden Sie mindestens drei Tage vor dem Meeting eine Erinnerung mit der Tagesordnung, den benötigten Materialien und Informationen über die zu verwendende Technologie.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass alle am Meeting teilnehmen und mitwirken
  • Eliminieren Sie Ablenkungen: Schalten Sie alle Smartphones aus und vermeiden Sie E-Mails und Instant Messaging während des Meetings.
  • Machen Sie Nebengespräche über ein Thema zur offiziellen Funktion des Treffens.
  • Entscheidungen und weitere Schritte dokumentieren

Virtuelle Meetings “Don’ts”

  • Halten Sie keine Besprechung ab, wenn Sie die Frage “Was ist der Zweck und das erwartete Ergebnis?” nicht eindeutig beantworten können.
  • Treffen nicht zur “Gewohnheit” werden lassen
  • Versuchen Sie nicht, mehr als fünf spezifische Punkte pro Sitzung abzudecken.
  • Lassen Sie weder Nebensächlichkeiten, “Experten” oder Muttersprachler das Meeting dominieren.
  • Halten Sie keine Sitzung, wenn die für die Ziele der Sitzung wesentlichen Interessengruppen nicht teilnehmen können.
  • Nehmen Sie nicht an, dass die Teammitglieder sich über ihre Rolle und die Ziele des Meetings im Klaren sind.
  • Halten Sie keine kontinuierlichen “Marathon”-Sitzungen ohne Brainstorming oder Pausen in kleinen Gruppen
  • Behandeln Sie kritische Themen nicht zu Beginn des Meetings
  • Lassen Sie die Besprechung nicht aus dem Ruder laufen, indem Sie die Details einer Aktion besprechen, die für die Ziele der Besprechung nicht relevant sind.
  • Fangen Sie nicht später an

Mehr Tipps zu virtuellen Teams?

Diese Dos and Don’ts sind nur eine kleine Auswahl der Tipps in unserem neuesten Ebook: The ultimate book of Virtual Teams checklists. Stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie eine Kopie herunterladen, wenn Sie daran interessiert sind, die Wirkung Ihres virtuellen Teams zu maximieren. Viel Spaß beim Lesen und…. lassen Sie uns wissen, was für Ihr virtuelles Team funktioniert!!

Warum, statistisch gesehen, Ihre E-Mails nicht so klar sind, wie Sie glauben.

Zum Zeitpunkt der Erstellung dieses Blogs werden schätzungsweise 269 Milliarden Mails pro Tag verschickt. Sobald wir alle Spam-Mails (sagen wir 50%) entfernt haben, ist das immer noch eine Menge Kommunikation. Doch wie effektiv ist E-Mail als Kommunikationsmittel wirklich? Einfach ausgedrückt – es kommt darauf an. Wenn eine Mail gut geschrieben ist, zum Beispiel mit dem SUGAR-Ansatz, kann E-Mail ein effektiver Weg sein, um Informationen zu kommunizieren und Ideen auszutauschen. Allerdings, wo E-Mail beginnt zu straucheln ist, wenn sie Emotionen enthält oder vermittelt. Und wir sprechen hier nicht über GROSSE EMOTIONEN – die meisten von uns wissen, dass es keine gute Idee ist, E-Mails zu verschicken, wenn sie müde, verärgert, wütend usw. sind. E-Mail-Kommunikation hat allerdings auch Probleme, wenn wir versuchen, viel subtilere Emotionen zu vermitteln – Ironie, Sarkasmus, Zufriedenheit etc.

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

Warum haben wir Probleme damit, Emotionen per E-Mail zu kommunizieren?

In unseren Gesprächen vermitteln wir Emotionen sowohl durch Worte als auch durch paralinguistische Hinweise (Körpersprache, Gesichtsbewegungen, Ausdrücke, Gesten, Ton, Intonation usw.). In der Tat wird es sogar komplizierter, da manchmal das Fehlen eines erwarteten paralinguistischen Stichwortes die Emotion oder einen gemeinsamen Kontext vermittelt, zum Beispiel beim Ausdrücken von Ironie oder Sarkasmus.

Wenn es um E-Mail geht, versuchen wir, Emotionen durch Wortwahl, Satzstrukturen und – ob man sie nun mag oder nicht – Visuals wie Emojis zu vermitteln (ja, sie sind mittlerweile auch im Geschäftsleben üblich).  Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zeigen jedoch, dass wir unsere Fähigkeiten beim Schreiben von E-Mails immer wieder überschätzen.

 

Warum das Schreiben einer E-Mail anders ist

Schriftliche Kommunikation ist nicht neu – aber die Allgegenwart und Verbreitung von E-Mail ist es!  Das Schreiben und Briefe verschicken bedeutete, dass wir in größerem Maße planten und überlegten, was wir schrieben und wie wir es schrieben. Niemand hat einen 3-zeiligen Brief geschrieben.  Heutzutage bedeutet die Geschwindigkeit und Bequemlichkeit von E-Mails, dass wir zu oft nur tippen und senden. Dies bringt eine ganze Reihe neuer Verhaltensweisen mit sich, und weil es so sehr Teil der modernen Kommunikation ist, nehmen wir uns keine Zeit, um zu beurteilen, wie wir die E-Mail verwenden oder unsere Schreibfähigkeiten zu schärfen.

Forschung zeigt: unsere Kommunikation per E-Mail ist nicht so gut, wie wir denken.

Es gibt viel Forschung von Sozialpsychologen darüber, wie wir per E-Mail kommunizieren. Eine interessante Studie zeigt, dass die Grenzen von E-Mail oft unterschätzt werden, wenn es darum geht, eine beabsichtigte Emotion zu kommunizieren – und dass wir beim Schreiben einer E-Mail immer wieder überschätzen, wie gut unser Leser verstehen, was wir sagen.

Veröffentlicht im Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, führten Kruger, Epley, Parker und Zhi-Wen Ng eine Reihe von Studien durch, in denen sie verglichen, wie gut ein E-Mail-Autor seine E-Mails gegenüber dem Leser bewertet hat.

  • In einer Studie erwarteten 97% der Autoren, dass die ernsten und halbsarkastischen Sätze in ihrer E-Mail korrekt entschlüsselt werden. Die Leser haben nur 84% erfolgreich entschlüsselt.
  • Eine andere Studie verglich das übersteigerte Selbstvertrauen bei der sprachlichen Kommunikation mit dem übersteigerten Selbstvertrauen bei der Kommunikation per E-Mail. Bei der Kommunikation mit der Stimme glaubten 77,9%, dass ihr Ton verstanden werden würde – während es in Wirklichkeit 73,1% waren. Eine spürbare Lücke ABER deutlich besser als die E-Mail-Ergebnisse, wo 78% glauben, dass ihr Ton verstanden würde, während es eigentlich nur 56% waren!
  • Aber es ist anders, wenn Sie einem Kollegen schreiben, der Sie gut kennt, oder? Möglicherweise nicht – eine dritte Studie betrachtete übersteigertes Selbstvertrauen, wenn sie mit Fremden oder mit Freunden kommunizierten. Überraschenderweise deuteten die Ergebnisse darauf hin, dass Vertrautheit nicht in Kommunikationsgenauigkeit übersetzt werden kann.
  • Und schließlich hat eine weitere Studie gezeigt, dass E-Mail-Autoren in ihrer Fähigkeit, in einer E-Mail lustig zu sein, sich stets selbst überschätzt haben!

Warum sind wir so überzeugt, dass unsere E-Mails leicht zu entschlüsseln sind?

Es ist einfach, den Lesern die Schuld zu geben. Vielleicht haben sie die Mail zu schnell gelesen, oder sie haben sie am Handy überflogen, als sie zu ihrem nächsten Meeting gingen. Vielleicht sind ihre Sprachkenntnisse nicht stark genug und sie müssen ihr Geschäftsenglisch verbessern. Oder – wagen wir es zu sagen – vielleicht sind sie einfach zu “blöd”, um unsere gut geschriebenen E-Mails zu verstehen!

Tatsächlich liegt es oft daran, dass wir egozentrisch sind. Studien wie Elizabeth Newtons “Tapping-Studie” – in der die Teilnehmer gebeten wurden, den Rhythmus eines bekannten Liedes, das sie hörten, zu klopfen  und dann abzuschätzen, ob ein anderer Zuhörer das Lied anhand ihres (überaus geschickten) Klopfens erraten würde (50% vs. 3%) – zeigen, wie leicht wir uns selbst davon überzeugen können, dass unsere Realität offensichtlich ist. Die Studien beleuchten auch, wie schwierig es ist, sich die Perspektive eines anderen vorzustellen (z.B. “Ich meinte es ganz klar ironisch – wie konnten sie das nicht verstehen?!)

Was können Sie also tun, damit Ihre Leser Ihre E-Mails richtig interpretieren können?

Hier sind drei Dinge, die Sie sich für die Zukunft merken können:

  • Bevor Sie auf Senden klicken, lesen Sie Ihre E-Mail mit Ihrem “Mehrdeutigkeits-Radar” erneut durch. Wenn etwas anders verstanden werden könnte, dann schreiben Sie es neu, erklären Sie es – oder löschen Sie es einfach.
  • Wenn die Mail eine emotionale Komponente hat, lassen Sie sie dreißig Minuten lang in Ruhe und lesen Sie sie dann erneut.
  • Wenn etwas ein Witz ist, benutzen Sie Emojis.

Und schließlich, wenn Sie nicht sicher sind, benutzen Sie das Telefon

 

Ihre erste virtuelle Präsentation – praktische Planungstipps für Einsteiger

Der Schritt zur virtuellen Präsentation ist für die meisten von uns nicht selbstverständlich.  Einfach ausgedrückt – es fühlt sich seltsam an. Hier, die gute Nachricht: die meisten der Grundprinzipien, die hinter einer effektiven Präsentation stehen, sind nach wie vor gültig. Sie müssen wissen, was Ihre Botschaft ist, wer Ihr Publikum ist, Ihre Botschaft mit den Interessen des Publikums verschmelzen, eine klare Struktur haben, und und und. In vielerlei Hinsicht erfordert eine Präsentation praktisch das gleiche Wissen und Können… aber es gibt auch Unterschiede. Wenn Sie ein Anfänger sind, Präsentationen online zu halten, gibt es 2 Bereiche an die Sie denken müssen – Vorbereitung und Durchführung oder Übertragung.  Unsere Kunden sagen uns oft, dass die Übertragung der Bereich ist, der sie am meisten beunruhigt, aber wir können nicht genug betonen, dass Änderungen an der Art und Weise, wie Sie Ihre virtuelle Präsentation planen, die Voraussetzung für den Erfolg sind.  Dieser Blogbeitrag schaut daher genauer auf die Planung. 

New Call-to-action

Wenn Sie mit der Planung Ihrer virtuellen Präsentationen beginnen, sollten Sie sich folgende 3 Fragen stellen

  • Wie soll ich die Aufmerksamkeit aufrechthalten?
  • Was kann ich im Voraus tun, um mich wohler zu fühlen?
  • Was, wenn etwas mit der Technologie schief geht?

Wie soll ich die Aufmerksamkeit aufrechthalten?

Die Aufmerksamkeitsspanne Ihres Publikums (wie lange sie sich auf Sie und Ihre Botschaft konzentrieren wird) ist online kürzer als offline. Teilweise liegt es daran, dass man sich nicht persönlich auf Sie konzentrieren kann. Andererseits wird das Publikum auch von anderen Dingen abgelenkt (eMail, andere Kollegen usw.) UND es besteht ebenfalls die Möglichkeit, dass die Aufmerksamkeit schwindet, weil Sie als Redner ja manchmal nicht sehen können, ob man Ihnen überhaupt zuhört. Um ihre Aufmerksamkeit aufrecht zu halten, müssen Sie also:

  • Halten Sie Ihre virtuelle Präsentation so kurz wie möglich. Kein Rat, den wir Ihnen geben können, hilft Ihrem Publikum, 2 Stunden lang konzentriert zu bleiben. Maximal 40 Minuten sind das Ziel. Brechen Sie es in 2 Teile  auf, wenn es länger dauern sollte.
  • Halten Sie sich von textlastigen Folien fern. Wir können mindestens doppelt so schnell lesen, wie wir zuhören können [http://www.humanfactors.com/newsletters/human_interaction_speeds.asp]. Das heißt, wenn alle Ihre Informationen auf der Folie geschrieben sind, wird Ihr Publikum dies gelesen haben, bevor Sie auch nur zur Hälfte darüber gesprochen haben. Ihr Publikum wird dann abschalten und etwas anderes tun, während Sie ihnen sagen, was bereits jeder gelesen hat.
  • Das bedeutet, dass Sie die Art und Weise, wie Sie Ihre Folien gestalten, überdenken müssen. Ihre Folien sind oft die wichtigste visuelle Verbindung, die Sie zu Ihrem Hörer haben. Das bedeutet, dass Ihre “Slides” sehr visuell sein müssen. Behalten Sie diese drei Tipps im Auge: ein starkes Bild ist besser als viele, ungewöhnliche Bilder werden die Aufmerksamkeit hoch halten und Diagramme müssen klar sein.  Vergleichen Sie die 2 Beispiele unten.

Was kann ich im Voraus tun, um mich wohler zu fühlen?

Wenn Sie zum ersten Mal virtuell präsentieren, dann

  • Verinnerlichen Sie Ihren Inhalt! Das gilt natürlich auch, wenn Sie eine Präsentation “leibhaftig” halten, aber unsere Erfahrung ist, dass Moderatoren die Inhalte eher in viele Notizen verwandeln und dann von ihnen ablesen, wenn sie virtuell präsentieren.  Ich erinnere mich an einen Einkäufer, der ein komplettes Skript mit Notizen zum Pausieren geschrieben hat!  Lesen statt Sprechen wird Ihre Energieniveaus negativ beeinflussen – Sie werden weniger natürlich klingen und letztendlich Ihr Publikum ermutigen, Multi-Tasking zu beginnen. Sie müssen wissen, was Sie sagen wollen, damit Sie sich darauf konzentrieren können, wie Sie es sagen. (mehr in Teil 2)
  • Üben, üben und nochmals üben – Wenn dies Ihr erstes Mal ist, können Sie nicht genug Zeit mit jemand anderem üben. Sie können auch einen zweiten Computer einrichten, damit Sie sehen können, was eine andere Person sehen würde. Dies hilft Ihnen, sich sicherer und selbstbewusster zu fühlen. Ihr Publikum wird es Ihnen danken. Denken Sie daran, dass dies eine Lernkurve ist und je früher Sie beginnen, desto besser. NICHT einfach anfangen und dann schauen was passiert!
  • Denken Sie über die Raum nach, von wo aus Sie präsentieren werden, und versuchen Sie, Ablenkungen und Unterbrechungen zu begrenzen. Wenn Sie können, präsentieren Sie aus einem Besprechungsraum, der ruhig ist.  Von Ihrem Schreibtisch aus in einem großen, offenen Büro zu präsentieren, wird schwierig sein, egal wie viel Erfahrung Sie haben.
  • Schließlich müssen Sie Zeit investieren, um Ihre Web- oder Videokonferenzplattform wirklich gut zu kennen! Hier schafft Praxis Mehrwert. Fast alle Conferencing-Tools haben Tutorials, leichte Erklärungen, Tipps und Benutzerhandbücher. Einige bieten sogar kostenlose Online-Kurse an. Nutzen Sie sie und machen Sie sich mit Ihrer Technologie vertraut.

Was, wenn etwas mit der Technologie schief geht?

Obwohl es eher unwahrscheinlich ist, steht die Angst davor, dass etwas mit der Technik schief läuft, bei vielen Neulingen von virtuellen Präsentation auf Platz 1. Hier sind 3 Dinge, die Sie tun können…

  • Üben Sie den Umgang mit dem System. Je mehr Übung, desto mehr Vertrauen in die Technik. Ich weiß, ich wiederhole mich und ich werde es wieder tun…. Praxis mit dem System ist das A und O.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass Ihr Computer aktualisiert ist (Updates herunterladen), dass Sie eine zweite Stromquelle haben (verlassen Sie sich nicht nur auf Ihren Akku) und dass Sie alle Programme geschlossen haben, die Sie nicht benötigen.
  • Organisieren Sie, dass ein erfahrener Kollege vor Ort ist, der Sie unterstützt. Bei Präsentationen vor einem größeren Publikum ist sind diese “zusätzlichen Paar Hände im Cyberspace” unerlässlich.  Sie konzentrieren sich auf die Präsentation und er/sie auf die Technik.

Zusammenfassend

Der Erfolg beginnt mit der Planung Ihrer Inhalte, der Anpassung Ihres Bildmaterials, der Kenntnis Ihrer Inhalte, damit Sie natürlich sprechen können, der Kontrolle Ihrer Umgebung und der Vorbereitung auf das gefürchtete technische Problem. Es gibt noch einiges mehr. worauf beim Präsentieren in einer virtuellen Umgebung zu achten ist und einige dieser Dinge werden in einem zukünftigen Beitrag diskutiert werden. In der Zwischenzeit gibt es hier ein eBook, das Ihnen hilft, mit all Ihren Präsentationen fertig zu werden – virtuell oder nicht.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

Virtuelle Teamkonferenzen

Häufige Probleme bei wöchentlichen virtuellen Telefonkonferenzen

Es ist Montag, und jeden Montag nehme ich an einer virtuellen Telefonkonferenz teil. Ein Teil von mir schätzt diesen regelmäßigen Kontakt, aber ein anderer Teil von mir mag diese Treffen nicht so sehr wie unsere persönlichen. Warum? Grob gesagt, weil sie so verschieden sind.

Ich kann niemanden sehen

Das ist offensichtlich, aber nicht weniger frustrierend. Wenn wir nicht sehen können, wer spricht, wer sprechen möchte oder welche Reaktionen die Menschen haben, ist die emotionale Seite des Gesprächs weitesgehend verschwunden.

Sich abwechseln

Ich weiß nie, wann ich an der Reihe bin zu sprechen, und es fühlt sich an, als ob es auch niemand anders tut. Das heißt, es wird nicht viel gesagt.

Auf der Bühne stehen

Wenn ich endlich an der Reihe bin, etwas zu sagen, habe ich das Gefühl, auf der Bühne zu stehen. Es herrscht Stille, ich kann weder Ermutigung noch Interesse sehen oder fühlen. Ich habe keine Ahnung, ob mir tatsächlich jemand zuhört, und falls sie mir zuhören, verurteilen sie mich? Verschwende ich ihre Zeit?

Der Zwangsjacken-Effekt

Wenn ich meine persönlichen Treffen mit unseren virtuellen Team-Telefonkonferenzen vergleiche, habe ich das Gefühl, in den Telefonkonferenzen eine Zwangsjacke zu tragen. In den persönlichen Besprechungen ist alles fließender, und wir plaudern und scherzen mehr – im Wesentlichen gibt es ein warmes, ermutigendes Umfeld.

Virtual team teleconference

Während wir Unternehmen schulen, wie sie ihre Teams in virtuellen Teams effektiv arbeiten lassen, setzen wir in unseren eigenen Telekonferenzen ein Beispiel und befolgen alle Regeln in dieser Checkliste.

Der Schlüssel zu einer effektiven virtuellen Teamkonferenz

  • Planen Sie das Meeting
  • Bestimmen Sie Zeit und Länge der Konferenz
  • Ziele setzen
  • Entwickeln Sie eine realistische Agenda, die die Ziele und die verfügbare Zeit widerspiegelt
  • Listen Sie spezifische Ergebnisse auf, die erreicht werden sollen
  • Priorisieren Sie Themen, die besprochen werden sollen
  • Identifizieren Sie, wer anwesend sein muss
  • Bestätigen Sie die Teilnahme und Verfügbarkeit
  • Ernennen Sie einen Leiter für jede Sitzung
  • Verteilen Sie Besprechungsmaterialien
  • Pünktlich beginnen
  • Einführung durch Vorstellung der Teilnehmer
  • Überprüfen Sie Ziele und Zeit für das Treffen
  • Aktive Teilnahme fördern
  • Fragen stellen
  • Fokus auf das Wesentliche – Nicht-Tagesordnungspunkte auf zukünftige Meetings verschieben
  • Rechtzeitig zum Ende kommen und ein paar Minuten für die Nachbereitung und Verabschiedung lassen
  • Sprechen Sie auf natürliche Weise in Richtung des Mikrofons
  • Machen Sie sich bemerkbar, wenn nötig
  • Gelegentlich pausieren, damit andere Kommentare abgeben können

Eine solche gründliche Liste gilt normalerweise nicht für ein persönliches Treffen, ist aber logisch notwendig, um erfolgreiche Ergebnisse in der virtuellen Umgebung sicherzustellen. Ich bin mit dem Logikteil d’accord, aber was kann man gegen den “Zwangsjacken-Effekt” machen? Ich habe oben “Aktive Teilnahme fördern” hervorgehoben. Wenn dies effektiv gemacht wird, kann sich die Zwangsjacke lockern und schließlich abfallen.

Aktives Zuhören in virtuellen Team-Telekonferenzen

Wenn wir aktiv zuhören, konzentrieren wir uns voll und ganz auf den Sprecher, bauen Rapport auf, erkennen die Bedenken des Sprechers an, zeigen Verständnis und entspannen die Situation. Ein “Anklagebank-Szenario” wird so in ein warmes, unterstützendes und ermutigendes Umfeld verwandelt. Der wichtigste Weg, um dies umzusetzen, ist durch Sprache.

Hier sind einige Redewendugen, die wir in unseren virtuellen Team-Telefonkonferenzen verwenden:

Verständnis und Interesse zeigen:
  • Was hat Sie dazu gebracht ……?
  • Warum haben Sie sich entschieden ……?
  • Wie wichtig ist das für Sie?
Unterstützung, Hilfe anbieten:
  • Was kann ich tun, um Ihnen zu helfen?
  • Was brauchen Sie, um …
  • Haben Sie konkrete Vorschläge, wie ich Ihnen helfen kann?
Die Bedenken der Redner anerkennen:
  • Ich verstehe
  • Ich kann Ihre Besorgnis nachvollziehen.
  • Das muss sehr schwierig sein.
Um Klärung bitten:
  • Wenn Sie XYZ erwähnen, was meinen Sie genau?
  • Ich habe nicht genau verstanden, was Sie gesagt haben – könnten Sie das wiederholen?
  • Können Sie mir mehr über XYZ erzählen?
Die Konversation vorantreiben:
  • Sie haben erwähnt, dass … – Wie gehen Sie damit um ?
  • Wann haben Sie zuletzt…?
  • Es ist interessant, was Sie über XYZ gesagt haben…

Für die meisten von uns ist eine Videokonferenz für virtuelle Teams niemals das gleiche wie eine persönliche Besprechung. Wenn uns jedoch bewusst wird, wie andere sich fühlen, wird die Konzentration auf unsere verwendete Sprache, dazu beitragen, eine unterstützende und produktive Umgebung zu gestalten. Haben Sie irgendwelche Tipps oder Sätze, die für Sie funktioniert haben? Lassen Sie es uns im Kommentarbereich wissen. Klicken Sie hier, um Ihre virtuellen Team-Telekonferenzen mit Target Training zu verbessern.

Virtuelle Team-Meetings: Empathie und Rapport aufbauen

How are your Virtual Team meetings?

More and more meetings are being held virtually. Virtual team meetings are a trend that is bound to continue as it is far cheaper than getting everyone together. But it isn’t the same, is it? Unless you use webcams, you can’t pick up on any nonverbal communication going on. You can’t see people’s faces. You can’t see what they are thinking. To be honest, you don’t know what they’re actually even doing. You also, and this point bothers me the most, can’t have that cup of coffee together at the beginning where you exchange a few words often unrelated to business.

Why is the social aspect so important?

You completely miss out on the opportunity to establish any empathy or rapport with the people you are working with. Imagine for example that you are having a virtual team meeting to discuss solving a problem you have. If you don’t have any form of relationship with these people, how can you expect them to help? Isn’t it easier to request help from someone you know a little about? If you don’t know them at all, how can you choose the right way of talking to them to win them over? Of course, the need for empathy building will vary from culture to culture. Some will take an order as an order and just do it, but not that many. And what happens if you have a multi-cultural team?

What can you do to establish virtual empathy and rapport?

It is doubtful as to whether empathy can actually be taught. But there are techniques which help to develop it. Here are a few:

  • Begin the webmeeting on time, with a quick round of self introductions. It is important to hear everyone’s voice and know who is present. Remind participants that each time they speak, they should identify themselves again.
  • Log in early and encourage small talk while waiting for everyone to join in and at the beginning of the meeting itself – have that cup of coffee virtually. This will help to make a connection between people and give them a bit of character. In a remote meeting you often feel distant from each other, and this can make it difficult to interact. This feeling of distance happens, because the participants are in different places and often can’t see each other. Small talk helps to ‘bridge the distances’. Small talk also helps you to get to know each other and each other’s voices, so you know who is speaking and when. This will help communication later on in the meeting.VTchecklists

What can you talk about and what should you say?

Small talk can also give you valuable information about the other participants which could be important to the success of the meeting. What mood are they in? Are they having computer problems? Are they calling from a quiet location? Here are some topics we recommend using and some language to get you started. There are literally hundreds of things you could say, but it can be helpful to have a few prepared. You’ll see that some of these are particular to virtual meetings:

Ort

  • F: Von wo aus sprechen Sie gerade?
  • A: Ich bin an meinem Schreibtisch. Wie ist es bei Ihnen?

Wetter

  • F: Wie ist das Wetter bei Ihnen? Bei uns ist es ziemlich düster!
  • A: Wir haben blauen Himmel und Sonnenschein. Hoffentlich kommt das bald zu Ihnen rüber!

Einloggen

  • F: Wie haben Sie sich eingeloggt? Ich hatte ein paar Probleme.
  • A: Es hat gut geklappt. Welche Probleme hatten Sie?

Tonqualität

  • F: Können Sie mich gut hören?
  • A: Tut mir leid, es ist etwas leise. Könnten Sie lauter sprechen?

Verbindungsqualität

  • F: Ich kämpfe hier mit einer ernsthaften Verzögerung. Wie ist es bei Ihnen?
  • A: Bei mir klappt es gut. Vielleicht ist es Ihre Internetverbindung?

Arbeit

  • F: Wie läuft es momentan im Marketing?
  • A: Ach, Sie wissen doch, beschäftigt wie immer. Wie sieht es in Ihrer Abteilung aus?

If you give lots of information in your answers, it makes it easier for the other person to ask more questions and keep the conversation going. If you just say ‘yes’ or ‘no’, it will stop the conversation. If you’re asking questions, remember to use open questions so that they can’t be answered with “yes” or “no”.

More on this topic can be found in our Using Collaborative Technologies Seminar. Do you have any tips you’d like to share on how to build empathy and rapport in your virtual team meetings? Let us know in the comments area below.

 

Getting people to read (and respond to) your emails

As everyone already knows, email is ubiquitous – in both our private and professional lives. Emails are easy to write and send – and we are inundated with them daily. As an in-house business English trainer at a major production site, I see daily the frustrations this can cause – not just for those receiving 90+ mails day (or 1 every 5 minutes!), but also for those sending the mails – knowing they may need to wait a while before hearing a reply. Recently, a manager I train in the automotive industry asked “How can I increase the chances that people respond to my emails?”

Studies have shown that people are more likely to respond to emails written in a simple, straightforward manner than to emails with more complex language. In fact, emails written at a 3rd grade level have been shown to have the highest response rate! So put away those thesauruses and get rid of those dependent clauses! Simple, concise writing is a main driver in increasing your response rate. As with any writing, placing your reader’s needs first is a must. There is no one magic formula for guaranteeing that people will respond to your email, but it’s important that you write emails that people will read. The tips outlined below will definitely tip the odds in your favour!

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook downloadTIP 1 – Keep your subject line obvious and short

Short, simple and obvious subject lines of only 3-4 words get the most responses. The most important thing, though, is to make sure the meaning is clear. Clarity beats ambiguity every time! Military personnel often use keywords e.g. ACTION, REQUEST, DECISION, INFO. This helps the reader immediately understand the purpose of the email. Then, just a couple more words to clarify the subject.

Example:

  • Prod Spec (vague)
  • End User Prod spec file plz send (relevant words but could be easier to understand the meaning!)
  • Request- Send Product Specifications file (optimal!)

TIP 2 – Use simple language

As part of my job, I work with engineers providing on-the-job English training. Last week Klaus (not his real name) asked me to help him understand a mail from a supplier. Klaus was struggling to understand …“Hitherto now, I have been unable to place the whereabouts of your aforementioned order, to which I would like to offer the following proposal, able to be fulfilled forthwith”.

Working together with Klaus we simplified it into “We’re sorry but we can’t find the order you mentioned in your email. However, we can suggest the following immediate solution …”.  As Klaus rightly said – why didn’t they just say that?

TIP 3 – Write human

In addition to simplicity, write with emotion! It doesn’t matter if that emotion is positive or negative, writing with any emotion is better than writing a neutral email with absolutely no emotion. The bottom line is: use a believable amount of emotion without getting too hostile or overly-sentimental.

Example of increasing positive emotion:

  • I want to meet next week to discuss my proposal. (neutral)
  • I would love to meet next week to discuss my proposal. (better but maybe a little over the top)
  • I’m definitely interested in meeting next week to discuss my proposal with you! (best!)

Example of increasing negative emotion:

  • Our experience with your product did not meet our expectations. (neutral)
  • From my experience today, I find the quality of your product to be sub-par. (better but “sub par” isn’t simple English)
  • Your product sucks. (too much human)
  • Based on my experiences today, the quality of your product is far below our expectations (best!)

TIP 4 – Write short sentences and paragraphs

When writing your email, make sure it’s an appropriate length. Imagine if you received a novel in your inbox. Would you even bother to read the first sentence? Probably not! The optimal length of an email is roughly 50-125 words, and the response rate slowly drops off as the emails get longer.  When you really need to write longer emails use sub-headings to break the text up.

TIP 5 – Keep the dialogue moving with clear questions

One final way to increase the chances your email will receive a response is to include a task, so ask a few questions! Otherwise, the recipient will most likely assume the purpose of your email is nothing more than to inform. Statistically, 1-3 questions are optimal. Any longer and it becomes a questionnaire, which quickly sends the email to the “do later” box. As I wrote earlier, you won’t get a response to every email you write, but you can change how you write your emails so that you are more likely to get a response when it counts most! And remember to use the phone or video calls if something is important, urgent or contains an emotional message.

Keep on developing your email writing skills with these blog posts

And if you’re looking for training (delivered virtually or face to face) then check out …

50 ways to start a conversation in English at work

Socializing and networking doesn’t come naturally to everyone. Whether it be a language issue  or a question of skills and behaviors, many professionals struggle when networking and socializing with new people. How do you start a conversation when you walk into a meeting room and there are a lot of people you don’t know? Introducing yourself is the obvious first step: “Hi, my name’s Renate and I’m a member of the purchasing team.” … Easy… but what comes next?  If you are shy this can be awkward in your own language –  AND doing it in a foreign language can be really challenging!  Our InCorporate Trainers often find that seemingly small challenges such as this can cause an unnecessary amount of pressure. A few trainers have come up with 50 phrases to help you break the ice and start a conversation. Many of the phrases can be used in any context – but some are only used in certain situations. You don’t need to remember them all just pick the ones you feel comfortable with and can say naturally.
New Call-to-action

Collecting someone from reception

  1. Did you have any problems finding us?
  2. Did you find the parking area ok?
  3. How are things going?
  4. I like your laptop bag. Where did you get it?
  5. Do you know…?
  6. What are you hoping to get out of today?
  7. How was your weekend?
  8. Did you hear that…?
  9. What have you been up to lately?
  10. Are many of your colleagues coming today?

Waiting for the presentation/meeting to start

  1. Is it OK if I sit here?
  2. I don’t think we’ve met before. My name is…
  3. Where are you from?
  4. I think you were at the XXX meeting last month, weren’t you?
  5. Do you know what the Wi-Fi code is?
  6. When did you arrive?
  7. What brings you here today?
  8. How was your journey?
  9. Nice weather / terrible weather, isn’t it?
  10. I could really use a coffee. Do you know where the machine is?

During the coffee break

  1. Do you mind if I join you?
  2. How’s the coffee?
  3. Can I pour you a coffee?
  4. What do you think of it so far?
  5. I was a bit late this morning; did I miss anything in the first 10 minutes?
  6. Which department are you in?
  7. Don’t you work with…?
  8. I can’t believe how many people are here today.
  9. Do you find it hot in here?
  10. I found it interesting that XX said …?

During lunch

  1. Is this seat taken?
  2. So, what do you think of this morning?
  3. Have you eaten here before?
  4. How’s your steak / fish etc.?
  5. Have you had a good day so far?
  6. Do you know many people here?
  7. Do you know what the program is for this afternoon?
  8. How did you get into this business?
  9. What do you do?
  10. Did you travel in today or come last night?

After a presentation/meeting

  1. What did you think of today?
  2. What’s been the highlight of the day for you?
  3. What have you learned today?
  4. I liked what xxx said about yyy.
  5. How’s today been for you?
  6. What do you think about…?
  7. What are you working on at the moment?
  8. How long have you been working here?
  9. Are you taking a taxi to the hotel/ train station / airport ?
  10. Do you have any plans for the weekend?

Even more resources

You’ve now got 50 practical phrases and of course there are  many, many more. Here are 5 more tips for you.

6 ways to improve your Business English by yourself

Whether you have English training at your companies or private training out of work, you probably know that to really improve your business English you need to take responsibility and control of your learning.  Just sitting passively in a training session once a week isn’t enough.  The good news is that according to popular research into language learning, we are all born autonomous learners. It is in our nature to be proactive, explore, and respond to our environment.  We naturally take charge of our learning by setting ourselves goals and we are driven by our own motivations and needs. This could be getting a promotion at work, being able to participate effectively in a meeting, working confidently on an international project or giving a successful presentation. To help you learn autonomously, knowing effective ways you can improve your business English independently is essential.  Here are some tried and tested strategies to improve your Business English by yourself!

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

Set yourself learning goals

Setting yourself goals is motivating in anything you do and a great way to understand your own learning process. These goals can be daily, weekly or monthly and ones, which are achievable and realistic. Try to focus on SMART goals (specific, measurable, achievable, relevant and time-bound).   Your goals can be as simple as “I will record and learn 10 new business phrases I can use in project meetings”.  Once you have set yourself a goal you can assess yourself using simple online tools such as Quizlet. You can also download the app on your phone in order to review and assess progress on the go!

Immersion

Put yourself in real life situations where you have to use business English. Take every opportunity to speak to your international business colleagues. Instead of writing an email, go ahead and pick up the phone! Try to participate in meetings, events, conferences and projects where you have the opportunity to practice. Communicate and socialize with English speakers you know at work or out of work, this could be going for a coffee, lunch or dinner.

Watch and listen

Try to take a little time every day to watch or listen to business related resources online. This could be news, podcasts, or videos.  The more you watch and listen to business English, the more you will train this skill and the easier it will get when you have a real situation at work.  The web is full of resources but to get you started TED Talks always has interesting speakers, The BBC’s Business Daily site has plenty of videos and audio reports and check out the Harvard Business Reviews’ Ideacast (also available on itunes) and videos.

Recording new vocabulary

Keep a small notebook or use your notes on your phone to record useful/ relevant business English phrases and words. If you want to get more creative, I suggest using a voice recorder to record this information.  Instead of just writing the English word and the equivalent in your language, try to also write an example sentence, something relevant/ personal to you and something you are likely to remember e.g. Word: negotiate “We had to negotiate with the supplier to get the best price”.  Try to review the new vocabulary daily in order to internalize it and challenge yourself to use a new word during your next meeting, in an email or on a presentation slide.

Writing practice

Start by downloading Grammarly. This is a free tool with which you can check all daily emails, presentations and documents in order to avoid grammar mistakes and punctuation errors. You can also keep a diary of your day or about your learning experience, which will give you some extra writing practice and is a great strategy for self-reflection. I train a senior project manager who takes 10 minutes at the end of each day to write notes on reflections, insights and ideas. He does this to practice writing notes in English to help with his many meetings, but also to ensure he has reflection time and can focus on what is important to his project.

Reading business related material

Reading improves all areas of a language, including vocabulary, grammar, spelling and writing. The more you read the more input the brain gets about how the language works.  Context helps you figure out meaning and repetition of vocabulary helps you remember the words.  If you don’t want to read long articles or blogs you can always download Twitter and subscribe to news or anything of interest to get your 15 minutes of reading practice a day. Our blog is a great place to start so bookmark it and there are plenty of online magazines and newspapers which are free.

The single most important thing though is to .. do something regularly.

Making a difference in meetings – 6 approaches for introverts to be heard

You’re too quiet”, “you need to be more involved in our meetings and discussions” and “people who matter are getting the wrong impression of you because you aren’t forward enough “.  This is the feedback Sven, a high-potential from a German automotive company, shared with me during a management training program. Sven was clearly able and bright – but he was a classic “introvert”. The idea of extraversion–introversion is a core dimension in most personality trait models, including the Meyers-Briggs Type Indicator. Sven is reflective rather than outgoing, and prefers working alone to working in groups.  Sven wanted to think before he talked, as opposed to talking to think. However, his natural introversion was getting in the way of his career opportunities.  Sven wanted to know “What can I do to be more involved in meetings … without having to be a different person?”
Go to the eBook

Always prepare before the meeting

If you don’t have the agenda then get hold of one. If the organizer hasn’t prepared an agenda then ask them what they want to get from the meeting and which questions do they want to discuss Who is going to be there? Why have they been invited? Who will assume which roles? Get your thoughts together ahead of time. Write down questions, concerns and points you want to share. Turn up with a couple of clear points you want to contribute. This preparation means that you can …

Speak up early on

If you know what the meeting is about you can and should get actively involved as quickly as possible. Get your thoughts on the table as quickly as you can. This means that you will feel part of the meeting from the start, others will see you as involved and you’ll notice people connecting, challenging, or building on your contributions. And if your meeting quickly goes into an unexpected direction …

Take control if you aren’t ready to speak

When somebody wants to pull you in to the meeting and you feel you aren’t ready then actively control this. You have the right to take a little more time. Try expressions like:

  • “I’d like to think this through fully first before I answer”
  • “I’m thinking this through and would like a little more time”
  • “I’d like to let this settle and think it over. Can I get back to you this afternoon?”

Be aware that there is a danger of over-thinking too, and you may find the meeting has moved on too fast. With this in mind …

Accept that sometimes you need to just speak

If you aren’t fully ready to speak but feel you can’t ask for time try expressions like …

  • “I’m just thinking out loud now …”
  • “My first thought is …”
  • “This isn’t a fully-formed suggestion but how about …”
  • “Ideally I’d like to think this over some more , but my initial impression is ..”

And you don’t always need to have original ideas. If you’re not at your best try to …

Play to your strengths and leverage your listening skills

Many introverts are considered good listeners. You haven’t been talking that much and you’ve probably heard things that others haven’t (as they’ve been busy talking). This means you can …

  • “If I can just reflect back what I’ve heard so far …”
  • “What I’ve heard is … “
  • “I heard Olaf mention XXX, but then everybody kept moving on. I’d like to go back and ask …”
  • “I think we’ve missed something here ..”
  • “There seems to be a lot of focus on XX, but nobody has thought about YYY”
  • “If I can play devil’s advocate for a moment ..”

Accept and embrace that you can’t be perfect (all the time)

Nobody wants to come across as stupid or incompetent. But if you aren’t visible be aware that people may quickly see you as “the assistant”, or “the doer but not the thinker”.  Everybody has said things that have been wrong, incomplete, or poorly thought through. And vulnerability is  important for building trust. We trust people who are human and fallible. Be open to risking sharing ideas and thoughts and try expressions like …

  • “This idea isn’t fully formed but maybe you can help me …”
  • “I’m concerned I’ve got the wrong end of the stick here so let me just check ..”
  • “I know I’m missing something but here’s where I am so far ..”

And finally…

If the English is an issue then consider getting some targeted training. By doing the above you’ll quickly begin to be seen as playing an active role, and be viewed as a contributor. You can also expect to grow in confidence over time as you see strategies working and people reacting to you differently.

 

Negotiations in English – tips and phrases (for beginners)

Working within a central purchasing and logistics business unit, negotiation is a word that one cannot escape. Most of my participants have dealings with suppliers within Germany, though some negotiate with suppliers worldwide. Negotiation skills are a key part of the on-the-job training and support that I deliver. In this post, I’ve collected some basic negotiating “musts” that I use in my training.

The big (free) eBook of negotiations language

Prepare

Preparation is the first key factor for all negotiations. In order for you negotiation meeting to be a success you must have clear goals in mind, acceptable alternatives and possible solutions, what you’re willing to trade, and finally what your bottom line is- where you are not prepared to budge. In “negotiations-speak”: You need to know your BATNA.

Start positive

Highlight all the positive goals both parties want to achieve for the day to reduce any tense atmosphere and break the ice with some healthy small talk.

  • Our aim today is to agree on a fair price that suits both parties.
  • I’d like to outline our aims and objectives…
  • How do our objectives compare to yours?

Effective questioning

Ask open ended questions in order to establish what the other party wants. Use questions to dig deeper, to uncover needs, to reveal alternative options, etc.

  • Could you be more specific?
  • How far are you willing to compromise?
  • Where does your information come from?

Agreeing

When your counterpart makes an acceptable suggestion or proposal you can agree to show enthusiasm and highlight how you are mutually benefiting from something. Revealing your stance will also help come to a favourable negotiation.

  • That seems like a fair suggestion.
  • I couldn’t agree more.
  • I’m happy with that.

Disagreeing

Disagreements are a normal and positive part of building a relationship and coming to an agreement, they show transparency. It is always a good idea to anticipate possible disagreements before going into a negotiation meeting.  However, disagreements should not come across threatening but instead should be mitigated and polite.

  • I take your point, however…
  • I’m afraid we have some reservation on that point…
  • I would prefer …

Clarifying

In order to avoid any misunderstandings especially in an environment where English is the lingua franca, it is fundamental to be clear about your goals but also ask for clarification when something isn’t clear to you.

  • If I understand correctly, what you’re saying is …
  • I’m not sure I understand your position on…
  • What do you mean by … ?

Compromising

Compromising is often required at times during a negotiation, and the way you do it is often an indicator of the importance of some of the negotiation terms. Remember, when you do compromise consider getting something for giving.

  • In exchange for….would you agree on..?
  • We might be able to work on…
  • We are ready to accept your offer; however, there would be one condition.

Bargaining

This is the moment to debate price, conditions or a transaction where one must be firm, ambitious and ready to justify their offers.  In this stage you can employ hard ball tactics or a softly softly approach, either way being prepared with a strategy will take you to the winning road.

  • I’m afraid we can only go as low as…
  • From where we stand an acceptable price would be…
  • Our absolute bottom line is …

Summarising

There are key moments when summarising will take place during a negotiation; concluding discussion points, rounds of bargaining and the final commitment.  This stage is also the moment of agreeing on the next steps and it is vital not to leave anything unsaid.

  • Let’s look at the points we agree on…
  • Shall we sum up the main points?
  • This is where we currently stand …

Of course…

There’s a lot more to negotiating. Sometimes not saying anything is a valuable approach, while creating and claiming value is also a must. Feel free to contact us if you’re interested in learning more about what we can do for you/your team. Or keep an eye on this blog, for more negotiation tips and phrases.

I’ll leave you with another great piece of free content: 1001 Meetings phrases.

Go to the eBook

Are language tests really the best way to assess your employees business English skills?

When a department manager asks us to “test their employee’s business English” there are typically 2 reasons – they want to know if somebody is suitable for a specific job, or they are looking for evidence that somebody has improved their business English. In both cases we fully understand the need for the information – and we often find ourselves challenging the idea of a “test”. HR & L&D, line managers, business English providers, teachers and participants are all familiar with the idea of tests – we’ve all been doing them since we started school – but as a business tool they have clear limits. 

DOWNLOAD THE CAN-DO TOOLBOX hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘6da22dcf-c124-41f2-8a4f-6f3a8c60c362’, {});

Are language tests really the best fit for purpose when it comes to corporate English training?

At the heart of these limits is the question “does the test really reflect the purpose?”.  These limits were highlighted in a recent newspaper article “Difficulty of NHS language test ‘worsens nurse crisis’”. The article focuses on the shortage of nurses applying for work in the UK, and behind this shortage are 2 factors: firstly the inevitable (and avoidable) uncertainty created by Brexit, and secondly that qualified and university-educated nurses who are native English speakers from countries such as Australia and New Zealand are failing to pass the English language test the NHS uses. One of the nurses said:“After being schooled here in Australia my whole life, passing high school with very good scores, including English, then passing university and graduate studies with no issues in English writing – now to ‘fail’ IELTS [the English language test] is baffling.”

To be clear there is nothing wrong with the International English Language Testing System (IELTS) per se. It is one of the most robust English language tests available, and is a multi-purpose tool used for work, study and migration. The test has four elements: speaking, listening, reading and writing.  My question is “Is this really the best way to assess whether a nurse can do her job effectively in English?”

Design assessment approaches to be as close to your business reality as possible

We all want nurses who can speak, listen, read and write in the language of the country they are working in – but is a general off-the-shelf solution really the best way?  What does a nurse need to write?  Reports, notes, requests – yes …essays – no.  Yet that is what was being “tested”. One nurse with 11 years experience in mental health, intensive care, paediatrics, surgical procedures and orthopaedics commented: “The essay test was to discuss whether TV was good or bad for children. They’re looking for how you structure the essay … I wrote essays all the time when I was doing my bachelor of nursing. I didn’t think I’d have to do another one. I don’t even know why I failed.”

Jumping from nursing to our corporate clients, our InCorporate Trainers work in-house, training business English skills with managers in such diverse fields as software development, automotive manufacturing, oil and gas, logistics, purchasing etc etc . All these managers need to speak, read, write and listen and they need to do these within specific business-critical contexts such as meetings, negotiations, presentations, emails, reports etc. So how do we assess their skills? The key is in designing assessment approaches which are as close to their business reality as possible.

Using business specific can-do statements to assess what people can do in their jobs

The Common European Framework of Reference for Languages (CEFR) is a scale indicating language competency. It offers an excellent start for all business English programs. BUT the CEFR does have 2 major drawbacks when it comes to business English:

  • The CEFR is not specifically focussed on business-related communication
  • The CEFR levels are broad, impacting their suitability for assessing the progress of professionals with limited training availability

In 2010, and in response to our client’s demand for a business-related focus, we developed a robust set of can-do statements. These statements focus on  specific business skills such as meetings, networking and socializing, presenting, working on the phone and in tele- and web-conferences. Rather than assessing a software developers writing skills by asking them to write an essay on whether TV is good or bad for kids we ask them to share actual samples – emails, functional specifications, bug reports etc.  They don’t lose time from the workplace and it allows us to look at what they can already do within a work context. The Business Can-do statements then provide a basis for assessing their overall skills.

This “work sample” approach can also be used when looking to measure the impact of training. Before and after examples of emails help a manager see what they are getting for their training investment and, in cooperation with works councils, many of our InCorporate Trainers use a portfolio approach where clients keep samples of what they are learning AND how this has transferred to their workplace.  This practical and easily understandable approach is highly appreciated by busy department heads.

To wrap up, I understand that the NHS relying on a reputable off-the-shelf solution like IELTS has clear attractions. However, if you are looking at assessing at a department level then consider other options.  And if you’d like support with that then contact us.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Meetings in English are fine but the coffee breaks are terrifying

Martin, an IT Project Manager, was getting ready for a meeting with his European counterparts to review his bank’s IT security. As ever he was very well prepared so I was a little surprised when he confessed to being nervous. However, it was not the meeting itself that was worrying him – it was the coffee and lunch breaks. His nerves were due to having to “small talk”. Small talk is an essential element of building relationships.  Yes, the meeting is all about dealing with business and discussing the items on the agenda but it’s in the breaks in between where the relationships are forged.
Go to the eBook

Why do some people find small talk so hard?

When we run seminars on small talk and socializing in English we hear many reasons why people struggle when they have to make small talk. Some people don’t know what to say, some are afraid of saying the wrong thing, some don’t know how to start a conversation, some are scared that people will think they are boring, some people find small talk a waste of time…and the list goes on. All of these objections, and fears are magnified when we know we are going to have to do it in a foreign language.

You prepare for the meeting so prepare for the small talk!

If you are nervous or uncertain about what to say during the breaks – prepare for them. First of all identify topics that are safe and suitable for the event and the people attending.  Depending upon the culture you are speaking with “safe topics” may be different but in general you are on safe ground with the following:

  • The weather – The forecast says it’s going to rain for the next 2 days. What’s the weather like at this time of year in Cape Town?
  • The event itself – I particularly enjoyed this morning’s presentation on big data analytics. What did you think of it?
  • The venue – This is one of the best conference centres I’ve been to. What do you think of it?
  • Jobs – How long have you been working in data security?
  • Current affairs, but NOT politics – I see they’ve just started the latest trials on driverless cars. I’m not sure I’d want to travel in one. How do you feel about them?

Opening a conversations and keeping it flowing

If you are going to ask questions, when possible, ask open questions. An open question begins with a question word – what, why, where, when, how etc. and the person will have to answer with more than a simple yes/no answer. Open question elicits more information and helps the conversation to develop. Similarly if you are asked a question (closed or open), give additional information and finish with a question. This will keep the conversation flowing.

7 phrases for typical small talk situations

  • Hi, I don’t think we’ve met before. I’m Helena Weber from IT support in Ludwigsburg.
  • I’m ready for a cup of coffee. Can I pour you one?
  • I believe the restaurant here is excellent. Have you eaten here before?
  • What did you do before you joined the product management team?
  • Where are you from?
  • Did you see the story on the news about…?
  • It’s a while since I last saw you. What’s new?

Don’t forget

Your counterparts may well be as nervous as you are and will welcome your initiative in starting and joining in conversation with them.  You could be taking the first steps in developing new personal and business relationships