Beiträge

Practical rules and resources for writing quality emails

This might be difficult to imagine if you are under 35, but when I started my career in finance there was no email. All written communication was by letter, and if something was really urgent you might send a telex or a fax. Written communication was an investment – an investment in time and in labour.  The process of sending a letter was a slow one; dictating it, the secretary/typist typing it, checking it, finally signing it, putting it in an envelope and posting it. There was no word processing software – if you wanted to make changes to the content, you returned it to the typist who would retype it.  Again, this may be difficult to imagine, but in some ways this wasn’t such a bad thing and there was a plus side to the writer and the reader. Exactly because it was so time consuming and labour intensive, you thought carefully about what you wanted to say and how you were going to say it. You invested in the quality of your written communication.

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

Today email communication, combined with documents being available online, has replaced the letter. Email beats snail mail letters. Approximately 280 billion emails are sent every day, and the average number of business emails sent each day is around 125 billion. In a recent workshop on Managing conflict in virtual teams one purchaser shared he had received 68 from a single person in one day!

Writing emails requires little effort and little thought– and obviously this is not always a good thing. Take a look at your inbox and ask yourself how many of these emails are unclear, unnecessary or simply unwanted. So why do we send so many? The simple answer is because we can. The process is simple, quick and easy. The challenge organizations face today is keeping the good stuff (quick, easy, simple) while eliminating the down sides.  This is made harder by our convictions that our writing is clear and understandable despite research showing we often overestimate this.

So if you want your mails to be clear, necessary and wanted then start with these 3 practical rules.

Write clear and understandable subject lines

It’s very likely that your reader is busy and that they have a lot of pulls on their time. Regardless of whether they are using a laptop, tablet or phone they will see your name/email address and your subject line. A clear and understandable subject line helps them prioritize your email, shows respect for their time, and builds trust. A clear subject line can also help catch your recipient’s attention and encourage them to deal with your mail quickly. Consider using BLUF (bottom line up front) in your subject line and also at the very start of your email.  Another simple tip that many virtual teams adopt is to  agree with your team members on a selection of limited key words (e.g Info, Action, Decision).  For more simple and practical advice plus a training activity on effective subject lines check out this post.
New Call-to-action

Write it how you’d say it

Many of us (and I am guilty of this) use a different style when writing.  Some people opt for different words, more complicated expressions and generally take longer to say something in writing than we would face to face.

For example…. “It has been brought to my attention that the complexities of the user interface are making life difficult for some of our users. I’d like to suggest we discuss this together”. Flipping it around some people also write emails in note form, or an overly casual style e.g. “Heard user interface difficult 4 user. Talk?” Writing as you speak would give you  “Some of our users are finding the user interface difficult to use. Can we talk about this together?”

Writing in a clear and direct style definitely helps clarity.  Pay attention to tone, and as a reader try to give the writer the benefit of the doubt when you feel the tone is odd.

Take a moment before you hit send

In the days when we sent letters we took a lot of time to think about what we were writing. We planned and drafted and there were many opportunities to change what we wanted to say or how we wanted to say it. You could read your letter through before signing it and at that moment decide if you really wanted to send it.
New Call-to-action

Today these inbuilt pauses don’t exist. You quickly read a mail, write the response and hit send. It is often done on the move and squeezed between other tasks, conversations etc.  That is generally OK for short, routine communications but for those that are longer, complicated or sensitive, type once but look twice is a good rule to follow.  Write your email, don’t add the address and put it in your drafts folder (or email it to yourself). Read it later and if it’s clear, understandable and unemotional – send it. For more help on writing emotionally neutral emails, see here.

 

Delivering your first virtual presentation – useful tips for beginners

No matter which system you are using, many people find their first virtual presentation to be an uncomfortable experience. Firstly, remember that the fundamentals behind what makes an effective presentation are generally transferable. Secondly, making changes to the way you plan your virtual presentation is where you set the scene for success. In a previous blog post”Your first virtual presentation – practical planning tips for beginners”, we looked at some key questions, including “How am I going to keep their attention in a virtual presentation environment?”, “What can I do in advance to feel more comfortable?” and the dreaded “What if something goes wrong with the technology?”. This post focuses on tips for actually delivering your first virtual presentation.  Contact us now

Build all-round confidence in the technology when you start

Start by demonstrating to yourself (and others) that the technology is working. This could be as simple as “Before we begin I want to take 30 seconds to check everybody is up and running technology-wise”. Check people can see the same thing, that they can hear you, and you can hear them. If you are expecting people to use other system functions e.g. comments, then this is the stage where you clarify this.

Remember that body language and eye-contact are even more important when presenting virtually

  • Position the camera so that either a) your audience has a good close up of your face, allowing them to see your eyes, smile and other facial movements, or, b) your upper torso so they can see your posture, arms and hands. Avoid the dead zone of  “head and shoulders”. They’ll see your head but can’t see the important facial details, nor the arms and hands.
  • When presenting look directly into your camera and not at the person you are talking to (as this will look as if you are actually looking away from them!). Although you won’t be making eye contact, the “illusion of eye contact” is important when presenting virtually.
  • If possible present standing with your laptop and camera at head-height. Its hard to maintain energy levels sat down.
  • If you are going to use notes, then have your notes at eye-height. Do not put your notes on your desk.  Looking at the top of your head doesn’t help your audience feel connected with you.
  • Always use a headset whenever possible. Mobile phones rob you of your hands and body language. And try to avoid talking over a speaker phone as this always impacts sound quality.

Virtual presentations aren’t natural for many of us at the very beginning.  I recall a purchaser sharing that “she felt like an idiot talking to herself”. But as with any communication skill if you integrate tips and advice and practice, practice, practice then they become less daunting and more effective.  Plan, practice and perfect -your audience will thank you.

Focus on bringing life and intimacy into your voice

  • Make an extra effort to speak with enthusiasm – if you sound nervous/ awkward/disengaged what are you expecting them to feel?
  • Use your hands naturally when you are speaking (even if the camera is focusing just on your face). Again, it will help you sound more natural and human. It will also help you feel more comfortable and confident.
  • Smile when you are presenting – even if the cameras aren’t on! This may sound strange but we can hear smiles, and a smile will always come through in your voice.
  • Consciously vary your pitch, volume and speed. If you are tend to speak fast then slow down for effect. Make your voice interesting to listen to.
  • Actively use pauses and “uhmms”. This remind your audience that this is a “live” presentation and that you aren’t a recording.

Build intimacy through questions and answers

  • Make a presentation – don’t read from your slides. Your audience can read faster than they can listen.
  • Encourage and take questions during the presentation. This is a huge step as it makes the interaction feel more personal, natural and fluid.
  • Use your audience’s names whenever possible. Again, this helps to make the presentation feel more conversational plus will strengthen their attention
  • Look for examples that create personal connections. This will make your presentation sound more like a dialogue vs. monologue.

And the most simple but often forgotten …

  • Keep a glass of water at your side. You’ll need it
  • And you’ll get better with practice!

 

 

Virtuelles Training vs. Präsenztraining: Wie sieht es im Vergleich aus?

James Culver ist Partner der Target Training Gmbh und verfügt über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Entwicklung maßgeschneiderter Trainingslösungen. Er war in seinen beruflichen Stationen ein HR Training Manager, ein Major der US Army National Guard und ein Dozent an der International School of Management. Er ist auch ein talentierter Perkussionist und Geschichtenerzähler. Im letzten Teil dieser Serie von Blog-Posts über die Durchführung von virutellem Training beantwortete er die folgenden Fragen…

New Call-to-action

Sie verfügen über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Durchführung von Schulungen. Seit wann bieten Sie virtuelles Training an?

James Seit den 90er Jahren. In den Vereinigten Staaten haben wir sehr früh mit der virtuellen Vortragsweise im Community College-System begonnen. Wir hatten oft  kleine Gruppen von Studenten an abgelegeneren Standorten, die dennoch die Vorteile von Kursen nutzen wollten, die wir auf dem Hauptcampus anbieten würden, also begannen wir, virtuelle Schulungen anzubieten. Als ich anfing, mit virtuellem Training zu arbeiten, war es extrem teuer, einen Teil dieser Arbeit zu erledigen. Unser System war im Grunde genommen eine Kameraeinrichtung und der Professor oder der Trainer sprach nur mit der Kamera. Es gab nur sehr wenig Interaktion mit den anderen Standorten und es war wie eine Art TV- Schule.

Wie sehen Sie den Vergleich von virtuellem Training zu fact-to-face Training?

James Es gibt wahrscheinlich zwei Dinge, über die man nachdenken sollte. Eines ist der Inhalt, den man vorträgt und das andere ist der Kontext. Mit Kontext meine ich alles, was den Inhalt umgibt. Wie die Dinge gemacht werden, wer mit wem interagiert und wie sie interagieren – das Gros der Kommunikation. Was den Inhalt betrifft, so sind das behandelte Thema und die geteilten Informationen auf virtueller und persönlicher Ebene gut zu vergleichen. Tatsächlich sind die virtuellen Plattformen, die wir bei Target Training einsetzen, maßgeschneidert für die Bereitstellung vieler Inhalte auf interessante Weise. Es ist sehr einfach, Videos, Aufnahmen, Whiteboards usw. hinzuzufügen. Wenn wir zum Beispiel Inhalte haben, die auf einem Slide vorbereitet und den Leuten zur Verfügung gestellt werden, können sie diese kommentieren, Fragen stellen usw. Das ist auf einer virtuellen Plattform wirklich sehr einfach..

Was meistens schwieriger ist, ist alles, was damit zu tun hat, im selben Raum wie jemand anderes zu sein: Gesichtsausdruck ändern, Körpersprache ändern. Wir sehen oder bekommen das oft nicht in einer virtuellen Umgebung mit, selbst mit den marktführenden Systemen. Die Herausforderung als Trainer besteht darin, einen großen Teil der Informationen zu verlieren, die wir von den Teilnehmern eines klassischen Präsenztrainings erhalten würden. Das ist eine harte Nuss. Als Trainer im Präsenztraining habe ich ein Gefühl dafür, wie es läuft, weil ich im Raum bin. Es ist viel schwieriger, ein Gefühl dafür zu haben, wie es läuft, wenn man sich in einer virtuellen Umgebung befindet. Und du brauchst dieses “Gefühl”, damit du dich anpassen und den Teilnehmern die bestmögliche Lernerfahrung bieten kannst..

Welche Workaround-Strategien gibt es dafür?

James Es gibt Workaround-Strategien und durch externe und interne Schulungen und On-the-job-Erfahrungen nutzen unsere Trainer diese. Eine Strategie ist, dass man viele offene und geschlossene “Check-Fragen” stellen muss. Fragen wie “Bist du bei mir”, “Ist das klar?”, “Was sind also die Kernpunkte, die du daraus ableitest”, “Was sind deine bisherigen Fragen?” Erfahrene virtuelle Trainer werden diese Art von Fragen alle 2 bis 3 Minuten stellen.  Im Wesentlichen hat ein Trainer ein Zeitlimit von 2 bis 3 Minuten für seinen Input, bevor er eine Check-Frage stellen sollte. Die Check-Fragen sollten sowohl offen für die Gruppe als auch für eine Einzelperson bestimmt sein.

Welche Schulungsthemen eignen sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise und welche nicht?

James Die Themen, die sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise eignen, sind diejenigen, die stärker auf Inhalte ausgerichtet sind – zum Beispiel klassische Präsentationsfähigkeiten oder virtuell ausgeführte Präsentationen.  Diese Art von Trainingslösungen konzentrieren sich auf Input, Tipps, Do’s und Don’ts, Best Practice Sharing und dann Praxis – Feedback – Praxis – Feedback etc..

Another theme that works very well for us when delivered virtually is virtual team training, whether it be working in virtual teams or leading virtual teams. By their very nature, virtual teams are dispersed so the virtual delivery format fits naturally. Plus, you are training them using the tools they need to master themselves. And of course, another benefit is if the training is for a specific virtual team the shared training experience strengthens the team itself.

Ein weiteres Thema, das für uns virtuell sehr gut funktioniert, ist das virtuelle Teamtraining, sei es in virtuellen Teams oder bei der Leitung virtueller Teams. Virtuelle Teams sind naturgemäß so verteilt, dass das virtuelle Übertragungsformat auf natürliche Weise passt. Außerdem trainieren Sie sie mit den Werkzeugen, die sie später selbst beherrschen sollten. Und natürlich ist ein weiterer Vorteil: Das Training für ein bestimmtes virtuelles Team, stärkt die gemeinsame Trainingserfahrung des Teams.

Die Arten von Trainingslösungen, die virtuell eine größere Herausforderung darstellen, sind diejenigen, bei denen wir versuchen, uns selbst oder andere zu verändern. Themen wie Durchsetzungsfähigkeit oder effektiveres Arbeiten müssen sorgfältig durchdacht und entwickelt werden, wenn sie mehr als ein Informationsdepot sein sollen. Hier ist der Coaching-Aspekt weitaus wichtiger.

Schließlich, und vielleicht überraschenderweise, kann das Management- und Führungstraining wirklich gut funktionieren, wenn es virtuell durchgeführt wird. Unsere Lösung Hochleistung zu erzielen ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür. Das Geheimnis dabei ist, das kleine Lernen zu betonen, zusätzliche Ressourcen außerhalb der Sitzung bereitzustellen, z.B. umgedrehter Unterricht (flipped classroom) mit relevanten Videos und Artikeln, und auch Möglichkeiten für Einzelgespräche zu bieten.

Virtuelle Meetings: Dos and Don’ts

Stellen Sie sicher, dass Ihre virtuellen Meetings produktiv sind

Virtuelle Meetings können manchmal knifflig sein. Sind sie eher wie ein Telefonat oder ein persönliches Treffen? Nun, sie sind eine Kombination aus beidem und sollten unterschiedlich behandelt werden. Hier sind einige schnelle und einfache “Dos and Don’ts” für virtuelle Meetings.

New Call-to-action

Virtuelle Meetings: “Dos”

  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass alle Beteiligten, die für die Erreichung der Ziele von wesentlicher Bedeutung sind, anwesend sind – ansonsten vereinbaren Sie einen neuen Termin.
  • Seien Sie flexibel mit der Besprechungszeit damit Mitarbeiter in anderen Zeitzonen ebenfalls teilnehmen können.
  • Erstellen Sie eine Agenda, die die Ziele des Meetings beschreibt.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass die Besprechungspunkte/Prioritäten/Zeiten mit den Besprechungszielen übereinstimmen.
  • Sagen Sie ein regelmäßig stattfindendes Meeting ab, wenn Sie der Meinung sind, dass die Zeit besser anderweitig genutzt werden könnte.
  • Senden Sie mindestens drei Tage vor dem Meeting eine Erinnerung mit der Tagesordnung, den benötigten Materialien und Informationen über die zu verwendende Technologie.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass alle am Meeting teilnehmen und mitwirken
  • Eliminieren Sie Ablenkungen: Schalten Sie alle Smartphones aus und vermeiden Sie E-Mails und Instant Messaging während des Meetings.
  • Machen Sie Nebengespräche über ein Thema zur offiziellen Funktion des Treffens.
  • Entscheidungen und weitere Schritte dokumentieren

Virtuelle Meetings “Don’ts”

  • Halten Sie keine Besprechung ab, wenn Sie die Frage “Was ist der Zweck und das erwartete Ergebnis?” nicht eindeutig beantworten können.
  • Treffen nicht zur “Gewohnheit” werden lassen
  • Versuchen Sie nicht, mehr als fünf spezifische Punkte pro Sitzung abzudecken.
  • Lassen Sie weder Nebensächlichkeiten, “Experten” oder Muttersprachler das Meeting dominieren.
  • Halten Sie keine Sitzung, wenn die für die Ziele der Sitzung wesentlichen Interessengruppen nicht teilnehmen können.
  • Nehmen Sie nicht an, dass die Teammitglieder sich über ihre Rolle und die Ziele des Meetings im Klaren sind.
  • Halten Sie keine kontinuierlichen “Marathon”-Sitzungen ohne Brainstorming oder Pausen in kleinen Gruppen
  • Behandeln Sie kritische Themen nicht zu Beginn des Meetings
  • Lassen Sie die Besprechung nicht aus dem Ruder laufen, indem Sie die Details einer Aktion besprechen, die für die Ziele der Besprechung nicht relevant sind.
  • Fangen Sie nicht später an

Mehr Tipps zu virtuellen Teams?

Diese Dos and Don’ts sind nur eine kleine Auswahl der Tipps in unserem neuesten Ebook: The ultimate book of Virtual Teams checklists. Stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie eine Kopie herunterladen, wenn Sie daran interessiert sind, die Wirkung Ihres virtuellen Teams zu maximieren. Viel Spaß beim Lesen und…. lassen Sie uns wissen, was für Ihr virtuelles Team funktioniert!!

Buchbesprechung: 5 tolle Bücher zur Leistungssteigerung Ihrer virtuellen Teams

Wie wir von vielen unserer Teilnehmer in unseren virtuellen Teamseminaren gehört haben, sind die Herausforderungen von virtuellen Teams ähnlich wie die von Face-to-Face-Teams, nur  nochmal vergrößert. Hinzu kommen neue Herausforderungen, wie z.B. die Auswirkungen des fehlenden sozialen Kontakts, der die Teams zusammenhält, oder die Anpassung der richtigen Technologie an die richtige Aufgabe. Die unten aufgeführten Quellen helfen uns weiterhin, uns auf praktische Lösungen für die realen Probleme und Möglichkeiten virtueller Teams zu konzentrieren. Wir hoffen, dass sie Ihnen auch in einer virtuellen Umgebung zum Erfolg verhelfen.

VTchecklists

Free eBook download

Virtual Team Success

von Darleen Derosa & Richard Lepsinger

Dieses forschungsbasierte Buch ist eine Zusammenstellung von praktischen Ansätzen für virtuelles Teaming. Das Buch enthält eine Reihe hilfreicher Checklisten und Best Practices, die als Leitfaden für virtuelle Teamleiter und Teilnehmer dienen können. Der Verhaltensfokus von Virtual Team Success wird Ihnen helfen, Probleme zu überwinden, bevor sie auftreten, und zwar mit einer sachlichen Beratung, die auf echtem Erfolg basiert. Wenn Sie die Investition von Zeit, Energie und Ressourcen zur Verbesserung Ihrer virtuellen Teams rechtfertigen müssen, hilft Ihnen dieses Buch dabei. Die Prozesse zur Lösung gemeinsamer Probleme in virtuellen Teams sind ein Highlight.

Mastering Virtual Teams: Strategies Tools and Techniques that Succeed

von Deborah Duarte & Nancy Snyder

Die Autoren von Mastering Virtual Teams haben Best Practices, Tools und Techniken aus der Teamtheorie und dem Informations- und Wissensmanagement auf die Herausforderungen virtueller Teams angewandt. Sie haben die Informationen in drei leicht verständliche Bereiche gegliedert: Virtuelle Teams verstehen, erstellen und beherrschen. Ihre große praktische Erfahrung als Professoren, Berater und Wirtschaftsführer prägen den “how to”-Ansatz des Buches. Das Buch bietet ein Toolkit für Teilnehmer, Führungskräfte und Manager virtueller Teams. Praktische Werkzeuge, Übungen, Einsichten und Beispiele aus der Praxis helfen Ihnen, die Dynamik der virtuellen Teambeteiligung mit Richtlinien, Strategien und Best Practices für interkulturelles und funktionsübergreifendes Arbeiten zu meistern. Statt einfach nur “Vertrauen aufbauen” zu sagen, geben uns die Autoren beispielsweise drei allgemeine Richtlinien für den Aufbau von Vertrauen in einer virtuellen Umgebung an. Kein Wunder, dass diese Faktoren auch in zusammengesetzten Teams funktionieren. Sie haben eine CD-Rom mit der dritten Ausgabe beigefügt – eine einfache Möglichkeit, die Checklisten und hilfreichen Dokumente aus dem Buch auszudrucken.

Where in the World is My Team: Making a Success of Your Virtual Global Workplace

von Terrence Brake

Where in the World is My Team: Making a Success of Your Virtual Global Workplace folgt den Heldentaten von Will Williams, der seinen Weg in einen virtuellen Arbeitsplatz und das Leben eines jungen Berufstätigen in London geht. Als Erzählung, die die Best Practices virtueller Organisationen und Teams verwebt, hilft das Buch dem Leser, Schritt für Schritte, Seite für Seite mitzugehen und Where in the World is My Team: Making a Success of Your Virtual Global Workplace nicht nur als Ressourcendokument zu verwenden. Das Buch ist weit mehr als nur ein unterhaltsamer Blick auf das digitale Leben. Der sehr detaillierte Anhang des Buches bietet recherchierte Unterstützung für die in der Geschichte hervorgehobenen virtuellen Strukturen und Werkzeuge. Die 6 C’s der globalen Zusammenarbeit von Brake bieten einen logischen Rahmen für die Bedürfnisse effektiver virtueller Teams.

Leading Virtual Teams

Harvard Business School Publishing

Leading Virtual Teams ist eine schnelle und einfache Anleitung für diejenigen, die nicht überzeugt werden müssen, ihre virtuellen Teams zu verbessern, sonder lediglich Tipps dafür brauchen. Das Buch behandelt die Grundlagen für diejenigen, die ihre ersten Erfahrungen mit führenden virtuellen Teams machen. Es gibt Hinweise auf verwandte Harvard Business Publikationen, eine Erwähnung des Harvard Erweiterungskurses zum Thema Managing Virtual Teams, der virtuell unterrichtet wird, und einen kurzen Test als Check-on-Learning.

The Big Book of Virtual Team Building Games

von Mary Scannell & Michael Abrams

The Big Book of Virtual Team Building Games füllt einen aktuellen Entwicklungsbedarf für viele virtuelle Teams mit Spielen, die den Aufbau von Beziehungen, die Lösung von Problemen und Teamfähigkeiten fördern. Die Spiele sind so konzipiert, dass sie mit verschiedenen virtuellen Teamplattformen gespielt werden können und sind geschickt nach Tuckmans Stadien der Teamentwicklung – forming, storming, norming, performing, sowie dem zusätzlichen Stadium transforming – angeordnet. Jedes Spiel wird ausführlich mit der ungefähren Zeit für die Fertigstellung beschrieben. Beachten Sie, dass Teams mit Mitgliedern, die eine Nicht-Muttersprache verwenden, etwas länger dauern können, als vorhergesagt.

 

Effektive E-Mail-Etikette für virtuelle Teams

E-Mail ist nach wie vor eines der häufigsten Kommunikationskanäle in virtuellen Teams – und das kann durchaus zu Spannungen führen.  Die proaktive Bewältigung potenzieller Probleme ist der Schlüssel zum erfolgreichen Start eines virtuellen Teams – deshalb diskutieren wir in unseren Präsenz- und Online-Seminaren mit virtuellen Teamleitern die Erwartungen.  Natürlich kommt dabei die Kommunikation ins Spiel und die Zeit, die für die Erstellung eines Kommunikationsplans aufgewendet wird, ist immer gut investiert. Wie Jochen, ein deutscher Projektleiter, sagte: “Es klingt so offensichtlich, dass wir nicht daran gedacht haben, es zu tun – und jetzt, wo wir es haben, kann ich schon sagen, dass wir einige echte Hindernisse gelöst haben”.

Erstellung eines Kommunikationsplans beim Start Ihres virtuellen Teams

Ein Kommunikationsplan beschreibt, welche Kommunikationsmittel Sie verwenden werden und wie Sie diese nutzen werden.  Zum Beispiel “wir benutzen Webex für Brainstorming und Problemlösung, wir benutzen Hipster zum Chatten und Teilen von Links und wir benutzen Email für….”

Bei der Erstellung des Plans geht es darum, Ansätze und Erwartungen zu diskutieren – und durch das Durchsprechen dieser Erwartungen können Sie verschiedene Einstellungen aufdecken und mit ihnen umgehen.  Ein Beispiel, auf das wir oft stoßen, wenn wir mit multikulturellen virtuellen Teams arbeiten, ist, dass ein Teammitglied erwartet, dass die Leute ein höfliches “Danke für die Nachricht” zurückschreiben, ein anderes kann dies jedoch als Zeitverschwendung – und sogar als lästig! – empfinden. Und weil E-Mail immer noch so allgegenwärtig ist, haben wir gesehen, dass die meisten Frustrationen von der Art und Weise herrühren, wie Menschen E-Mails nutzen (oder nicht nutzen). Damit Sie mit Ihrer Planung beginnen können, teilen wir Ihnen hier eine Liste von E-Mail-Verpflichtungen mit, denen einer unserer Kunden zugestimmt hat (natürlich mit deren Erlaubnis).

E-Mail-Verpflichtungen eines Software-Entwicklungsteams, das virtuell in 3 Ländern arbeitet

  1. Wir werden unsere E-Mails mindestens alle 3 Stunden überprüfen.
  2. Wir checken keine E-Mails, wenn wir in Meetings sind.
  3. Wir benutzen das Telefon und hinterlassen eine Nachricht, wenn etwas wirklich zeitkritisch ist.
  4. Wir schreiben E-Mail-Betreffzeilen, die sofort erklären, worum es in der E-Mail geht.
  5. Wir werden Schlüsselwörter wie “Erledigen bis zum XX” oder “zu Ihrer Information” in den Titeln verwenden.
  6. Wir gehen davon aus, dass jemand, der in eine E-Mail kopiert wird (cc), nicht antworten muss.
  7. Wir werden es vermeiden, “Antwort an alle” zu verwenden, wenn nicht jeder die Informationen unbedingt benötigt.
  8. Wir benutzen das Telefon, wenn 3 E-Mails zu einem Thema geschickt wurden.
  9. Wir akzeptieren, dass E-Mails, die von Handys gesendet werden, gelegentlich Tippfehler enthalten.
  10. Wir erwarten, dass größere E-Mails gut geschrieben sind.
  11. Wir verwenden keine BLOCKSCHRIFT (CAPITALS) und wir benutzen normalerweise keine Farben, es sei denn, etwas ist kritisch und wichtig.
  12. Wir verwenden fett, um dabei zu helfen, nach wichtigen Informationen zu scannen.
  13. Wir schenken den Personen im Zweifel immer das Vertrauen, wenn etwas auf zwei Arten verstanden werden kann.
  14. Wenn wir eine E-Mail in einem emotionalen Zustand schreiben, sind wir uns alle einig, dass wir sie speichern werden – und am nächsten Tag darauf zurückkommen. Und trotzdem wird ein Anruf von allen bevorzugt.
  15. Wenn wir zwischenmenschliche Probleme haben, verwenden wir keine E-Mails – wir benutzen das Telefon oder nutzen Skype für Unternehmen.
  16. Wir werden diese Liste jedes 4. Skype-Meeting überprüfen. Halten wir uns noch alle daran?

Die obige Liste ist klar und übersichtlich. Sie wurde in einer 30-minütigen Diskussion aufgebaut und sie funktioniert. Wir werben nicht dafür, dass Ihr sie wörtlich nehmt – aber warum nicht als Sprungbrett nutzen, um das Verhalten Ihres eigenen Teams zu diskutieren? Der Aufbau eines gemeinsamen Verständnisses im Vorfeld hilft Ihrem virtuellen Team, reibungslos und sicher zu kommunizieren.

Und wenn Sie mehr lesen wollen

Hier ist ein nützliches Dokument (auf Englisch) mit Tipps und Redewendungen für eine effektive Kommunikation zwischen verschiedene Kulturen.

Ihre erste virtuelle Präsentation – praktische Planungstipps für Einsteiger

Der Schritt zur virtuellen Präsentation ist für die meisten von uns nicht selbstverständlich.  Einfach ausgedrückt – es fühlt sich seltsam an. Hier, die gute Nachricht: die meisten der Grundprinzipien, die hinter einer effektiven Präsentation stehen, sind nach wie vor gültig. Sie müssen wissen, was Ihre Botschaft ist, wer Ihr Publikum ist, Ihre Botschaft mit den Interessen des Publikums verschmelzen, eine klare Struktur haben, und und und. In vielerlei Hinsicht erfordert eine Präsentation praktisch das gleiche Wissen und Können… aber es gibt auch Unterschiede. Wenn Sie ein Anfänger sind, Präsentationen online zu halten, gibt es 2 Bereiche an die Sie denken müssen – Vorbereitung und Durchführung oder Übertragung.  Unsere Kunden sagen uns oft, dass die Übertragung der Bereich ist, der sie am meisten beunruhigt, aber wir können nicht genug betonen, dass Änderungen an der Art und Weise, wie Sie Ihre virtuelle Präsentation planen, die Voraussetzung für den Erfolg sind.  Dieser Blogbeitrag schaut daher genauer auf die Planung. 

New Call-to-action

Wenn Sie mit der Planung Ihrer virtuellen Präsentationen beginnen, sollten Sie sich folgende 3 Fragen stellen

  • Wie soll ich die Aufmerksamkeit aufrechthalten?
  • Was kann ich im Voraus tun, um mich wohler zu fühlen?
  • Was, wenn etwas mit der Technologie schief geht?

Wie soll ich die Aufmerksamkeit aufrechthalten?

Die Aufmerksamkeitsspanne Ihres Publikums (wie lange sie sich auf Sie und Ihre Botschaft konzentrieren wird) ist online kürzer als offline. Teilweise liegt es daran, dass man sich nicht persönlich auf Sie konzentrieren kann. Andererseits wird das Publikum auch von anderen Dingen abgelenkt (eMail, andere Kollegen usw.) UND es besteht ebenfalls die Möglichkeit, dass die Aufmerksamkeit schwindet, weil Sie als Redner ja manchmal nicht sehen können, ob man Ihnen überhaupt zuhört. Um ihre Aufmerksamkeit aufrecht zu halten, müssen Sie also:

  • Halten Sie Ihre virtuelle Präsentation so kurz wie möglich. Kein Rat, den wir Ihnen geben können, hilft Ihrem Publikum, 2 Stunden lang konzentriert zu bleiben. Maximal 40 Minuten sind das Ziel. Brechen Sie es in 2 Teile  auf, wenn es länger dauern sollte.
  • Halten Sie sich von textlastigen Folien fern. Wir können mindestens doppelt so schnell lesen, wie wir zuhören können [http://www.humanfactors.com/newsletters/human_interaction_speeds.asp]. Das heißt, wenn alle Ihre Informationen auf der Folie geschrieben sind, wird Ihr Publikum dies gelesen haben, bevor Sie auch nur zur Hälfte darüber gesprochen haben. Ihr Publikum wird dann abschalten und etwas anderes tun, während Sie ihnen sagen, was bereits jeder gelesen hat.
  • Das bedeutet, dass Sie die Art und Weise, wie Sie Ihre Folien gestalten, überdenken müssen. Ihre Folien sind oft die wichtigste visuelle Verbindung, die Sie zu Ihrem Hörer haben. Das bedeutet, dass Ihre “Slides” sehr visuell sein müssen. Behalten Sie diese drei Tipps im Auge: ein starkes Bild ist besser als viele, ungewöhnliche Bilder werden die Aufmerksamkeit hoch halten und Diagramme müssen klar sein.  Vergleichen Sie die 2 Beispiele unten.

Was kann ich im Voraus tun, um mich wohler zu fühlen?

Wenn Sie zum ersten Mal virtuell präsentieren, dann

  • Verinnerlichen Sie Ihren Inhalt! Das gilt natürlich auch, wenn Sie eine Präsentation “leibhaftig” halten, aber unsere Erfahrung ist, dass Moderatoren die Inhalte eher in viele Notizen verwandeln und dann von ihnen ablesen, wenn sie virtuell präsentieren.  Ich erinnere mich an einen Einkäufer, der ein komplettes Skript mit Notizen zum Pausieren geschrieben hat!  Lesen statt Sprechen wird Ihre Energieniveaus negativ beeinflussen – Sie werden weniger natürlich klingen und letztendlich Ihr Publikum ermutigen, Multi-Tasking zu beginnen. Sie müssen wissen, was Sie sagen wollen, damit Sie sich darauf konzentrieren können, wie Sie es sagen. (mehr in Teil 2)
  • Üben, üben und nochmals üben – Wenn dies Ihr erstes Mal ist, können Sie nicht genug Zeit mit jemand anderem üben. Sie können auch einen zweiten Computer einrichten, damit Sie sehen können, was eine andere Person sehen würde. Dies hilft Ihnen, sich sicherer und selbstbewusster zu fühlen. Ihr Publikum wird es Ihnen danken. Denken Sie daran, dass dies eine Lernkurve ist und je früher Sie beginnen, desto besser. NICHT einfach anfangen und dann schauen was passiert!
  • Denken Sie über die Raum nach, von wo aus Sie präsentieren werden, und versuchen Sie, Ablenkungen und Unterbrechungen zu begrenzen. Wenn Sie können, präsentieren Sie aus einem Besprechungsraum, der ruhig ist.  Von Ihrem Schreibtisch aus in einem großen, offenen Büro zu präsentieren, wird schwierig sein, egal wie viel Erfahrung Sie haben.
  • Schließlich müssen Sie Zeit investieren, um Ihre Web- oder Videokonferenzplattform wirklich gut zu kennen! Hier schafft Praxis Mehrwert. Fast alle Conferencing-Tools haben Tutorials, leichte Erklärungen, Tipps und Benutzerhandbücher. Einige bieten sogar kostenlose Online-Kurse an. Nutzen Sie sie und machen Sie sich mit Ihrer Technologie vertraut.

Was, wenn etwas mit der Technologie schief geht?

Obwohl es eher unwahrscheinlich ist, steht die Angst davor, dass etwas mit der Technik schief läuft, bei vielen Neulingen von virtuellen Präsentation auf Platz 1. Hier sind 3 Dinge, die Sie tun können…

  • Üben Sie den Umgang mit dem System. Je mehr Übung, desto mehr Vertrauen in die Technik. Ich weiß, ich wiederhole mich und ich werde es wieder tun…. Praxis mit dem System ist das A und O.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass Ihr Computer aktualisiert ist (Updates herunterladen), dass Sie eine zweite Stromquelle haben (verlassen Sie sich nicht nur auf Ihren Akku) und dass Sie alle Programme geschlossen haben, die Sie nicht benötigen.
  • Organisieren Sie, dass ein erfahrener Kollege vor Ort ist, der Sie unterstützt. Bei Präsentationen vor einem größeren Publikum ist sind diese “zusätzlichen Paar Hände im Cyberspace” unerlässlich.  Sie konzentrieren sich auf die Präsentation und er/sie auf die Technik.

Zusammenfassend

Der Erfolg beginnt mit der Planung Ihrer Inhalte, der Anpassung Ihres Bildmaterials, der Kenntnis Ihrer Inhalte, damit Sie natürlich sprechen können, der Kontrolle Ihrer Umgebung und der Vorbereitung auf das gefürchtete technische Problem. Es gibt noch einiges mehr. worauf beim Präsentieren in einer virtuellen Umgebung zu achten ist und einige dieser Dinge werden in einem zukünftigen Beitrag diskutiert werden. In der Zwischenzeit gibt es hier ein eBook, das Ihnen hilft, mit all Ihren Präsentationen fertig zu werden – virtuell oder nicht.

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

Virtuelle Teams: Aufgaben vor dem Meeting

Was machen Sie vor Ihren virtuellen Teambesprechungen?

Die Vorbereitung auf ein Meeting ist wichtig, insbesondere für virtuelle Meetings via Telefonkonferenz oder Netmeetings. Es ist schwierig, in virtuellen Teams zu arbeiten, da man die anderen Teammitglieder nicht oft von Angesicht zu Angesicht sieht. Versuchen Sie also ein paar kleine Dinge vor Ihren Meetings anzupacken, um sich nicht weiter zu benachteiligen. Hier sind fünf einfache Dinge, die Sie vor Ihren virtuellen Teambesprechungen tun können, um sie produktiver zu machen.

5 Aufgaben vor dem virtuellen Meeting

1.  Teammitglieder identifizieren

Führen Sie die Entscheidungsträger, Fachexperten und Meinungsführer vor dem Treffen auf und ermitteln Sie ihr mögliches Interesse am Ausgang des Treffens.

Resultate:

  • Wissen, wen man wann ansprechen muss
  • Wissen, wer bestimmte technische Fragen beantworten kann
  • Informationen auf die Interessen der Entscheidungsträger fokussieren

2.  Grundregeln festlegen

Das Team entscheidet vor Beginn der Sitzung über ein akzeptables Meeting-Verhalten und hält sich gegenseitig für die Regeln verantwortlich; z.B. keine Unterbrechungen, Meinungsumfragen, immer eine Tagesordnung usw…

Resultate:

  • Förderung von Verhaltensweisen, die die Interaktion in der Gruppe verbessern.
  • Kein einziger “Vollstrecker” notwendig
  • Verantwortlichkeit durch Erinnern

3.  Veröffentlichung einer Agenda (Ziele)

Die Veröffentlichung einer Agenda sollte ein “Muss” sein, aber es passiert nicht immer oder nicht rechtzeitig, damit sich die Teilnehmer darauf vorbereiten können. Ein weiteres wichtiges Merkmal einer Agenda ist eine Absichtserklärung oder ein Ziel. Was wollen Sie mit dem Treffen erreichen? Wie sieht ein gutes Meeting aus? Die Beantwortung dieser Fragen wird Ihnen und Ihren Teilnehmern das Gefühl geben, etwas erreicht zu haben, wenn das Meeting vorbei ist.

Resultate:

  • Klare Richtung für das Treffen
  • Verbesserung der Vorbereitung der Teilnehmer
  • Art und Weise, wie die Teilnehmer sich auf das Thema konzentrieren können.
  • Das Gefühl verspüren, etwas erreicht zu haben, wenn es vorbei ist.

4.  Beziehungen aufbauen

Nehmen Sie sich vor dem Meeting Zeit, um die Teammitglieder persönlich kennenzulernen. Es ist wirklich wichtig, eine Beziehung und eine Verpflichtung zum virtuellen Team aufzubauen.

Resultate:

  • Lernen, woran andere, über die Arbeit des Treffens hinaus, interessiert sind
  • Mehr Informationen helfen dem besseren Verständnis
  • Helfen Sie, Metaphern und Geschichten zu entwerfen, um die wichtigsten Punkte zu illustrieren.
  • Erhöhung des Engagements für das virtuelle Team

5.  Beherrschen Sie die Technik, die Sie in Ihrem Meeting verwenden

Das Verstehen Ihrer technologischen Tools, was schief gehen kann und wie man es im Vorfeld des Meetings beheben kann, ist entscheidend. Seien Sie informiert darüber, welche Werkzeuge Ihren Teilnehmern zur Verfügung stehen und seien Sie bereit, den Teilnehmern bei Problemen zu helfen. Haben Sie immer einen Notfallplan in der Rückhand!

Resultate:

  • Technische Probleme vermeiden, bevor sie auftreten
  • Zeitersparnis bei der Lösung technischer Probleme während der Besprechung
  • Andere Teilnahmemöglichkeiten parat haben

Sie können sicherstellen, dass Ihre virtuellen Teambesprechungen reibungsloser ablaufen, indem Sie sich ein paar Minuten Zeit nehmen und die oben genannten fünf Dinge tun. Was haben Sie noch getan, das gut funktioniert hat? Lassen Sie es uns im Kommentarfeld unten wissen. Wenn Sie Ihre Teilnahme an virtuellen Teams insgesamt verbessern möchten, können Sie unser eBook mit Checklisten herunterladen und unser Seminar “Effektiv in virtuellen Teams arbeiten” besuchen, indem Sie hier klicken.

Virtuell Feedback geben

Müssen Sie manchmal Ihr Feedback virtuell geben?

Geben Sie Ihren Lieferanten, Kunden und Mitarbeitern effektives Feedback – sowohl positiv als auch konstruktiv (negativ)? Gutes, rechtzeitiges, konstruktives und umsetzbares Feedback zu geben, ist etwas, wofür die meisten von uns viel Arbeit investieren müssen. Loben wir die richtigen Dinge? Wenn wir konstruktives Feedback geben, machen wir dann positive Vorschläge? Denken wir immer daran, das Thema anzusprechen, nicht die Person?VTchecklists

Feedback zu geben allein ist schon nicht einfach. Aber in einer immer virtueller werdenden Geschäftswelt gutes Feedback zu geben, kann eine echte Herausforderung sein. Wenn wir ein paar der Komplexitäten hinzufügen, die sich aus der virtuellen Interaktion ergeben, müssen wir eine noch schwierigere Aufgabe bewältigen. Einige dieser Herausforderungen sind Timing, Lesereaktionen, Spezifität und Ton. Wenn Sie virtuell, z.B. per E-Mail, Feedback geben, finden Sie hier einige Vorschläge und Tipps, die Ihnen helfen sollen, Ihre Arbeit besser zu machen.

Free eBook download

5 Tipps für das virtuelle Feedback

 1.  Stellen Sie sicher, dass das Timing stimmt – vor allem, wenn Ihr Feedback negativ ist. Denken Sie daran, wie ein Kind oder ein Haustier aufgezogen wird: Ihnen drei Tage später zu sagen, dass sie etwas falsch gemacht haben, ist kontraproduktiv!

2.  Sorgen Sie dafür, dass der Leser sofort versteht, worum es in der E-Mail geht:

  • Verwenden Sie eine Betreffzeile wie: “Feedback zu Ihrem Vorschlag”
  • Sagen Sie im ersten Satz, warum Sie eine E-Mail schreiben: “Ich schreibe Ihnen ein Feedback zu dem Vorschlag, den Sie mir am 4. Januar geschickt haben.”
  • Sagen Sie, welches Feedback enthalten ist: “Ich habe einige Rückmeldungen bezüglich der Preisgestaltung und des Zahlungsprozesses.”

3.  Brechen Sie Ihr Feedback auf. Wenn Sie gesagt haben, dass Sie eine Rückmeldung über den Preis und den Zahlungsprozess haben, sollten dies zwei völlig getrennte Absätze sein. Geben Sie ihnen Überschriften, wenn Sie wollen.

4.  Versuchen Sie konkret zu sein und begründen Sie Ihre Aussagen. Zum Beispiel:

  • “Wir mochten Ihren Vorschlag.” Vor allem die zweite Seite, auf der Sie erwähnt haben, dass sich das Training auf unsere Unternehmenswerte konzentrieren würde. Das passt wirklich zu unserer Firmenphilosophie.”
  • “Leider können wir dem Punkt 3 in Abschnitt 2, der sich auf die Zahlungsmöglichkeiten bezieht, nicht zustimmen. Das steht nicht im Einklang mit unseren Compliance-Richtlinien.”

5.  Wenn Sie einen Vorschlag ablehnen, versuchen Sie, einen Gegenvorschlag zu machen. Zum Beispiel:

  • “Wir können Punkt 3 in Abschnitt 2 nicht zustimmen. Aber wir könnten uns einigen, wenn die Zahlungsfrist auf 60 Tage verlängert würde.”
  • “Mir gefällt es nicht, wie Sie den Bericht formatiert haben. Könnten Sie es nächstes Mal anhand des beigefügten Beispiels versuchen oder kommen Sie einfach zu mir, um meine Anforderungen genauer zu besprechen.”

Natürlich gibt es noch viele andere Dinge, die helfen können, das virtuelles Feedback effektiver zu gestalten. Bitte zögern Sie nicht, Ihre zusätzlichen Ideen in den Kommentaren unten einzutragen. Besuchen Sie auch unser Seminar “Effektiv in virtuellen Teams arbeiten“, um die Leistung Ihres virtuellen Teams zu verbessern.

 

 

Virtuelle Team-Meetings: Empathie und Rapport aufbauen

How are your Virtual Team meetings?

More and more meetings are being held virtually. Virtual team meetings are a trend that is bound to continue as it is far cheaper than getting everyone together. But it isn’t the same, is it? Unless you use webcams, you can’t pick up on any nonverbal communication going on. You can’t see people’s faces. You can’t see what they are thinking. To be honest, you don’t know what they’re actually even doing. You also, and this point bothers me the most, can’t have that cup of coffee together at the beginning where you exchange a few words often unrelated to business.

Why is the social aspect so important?

You completely miss out on the opportunity to establish any empathy or rapport with the people you are working with. Imagine for example that you are having a virtual team meeting to discuss solving a problem you have. If you don’t have any form of relationship with these people, how can you expect them to help? Isn’t it easier to request help from someone you know a little about? If you don’t know them at all, how can you choose the right way of talking to them to win them over? Of course, the need for empathy building will vary from culture to culture. Some will take an order as an order and just do it, but not that many. And what happens if you have a multi-cultural team?

What can you do to establish virtual empathy and rapport?

It is doubtful as to whether empathy can actually be taught. But there are techniques which help to develop it. Here are a few:

  • Begin the webmeeting on time, with a quick round of self introductions. It is important to hear everyone’s voice and know who is present. Remind participants that each time they speak, they should identify themselves again.
  • Log in early and encourage small talk while waiting for everyone to join in and at the beginning of the meeting itself – have that cup of coffee virtually. This will help to make a connection between people and give them a bit of character. In a remote meeting you often feel distant from each other, and this can make it difficult to interact. This feeling of distance happens, because the participants are in different places and often can’t see each other. Small talk helps to ‘bridge the distances’. Small talk also helps you to get to know each other and each other’s voices, so you know who is speaking and when. This will help communication later on in the meeting.VTchecklists

What can you talk about and what should you say?

Small talk can also give you valuable information about the other participants which could be important to the success of the meeting. What mood are they in? Are they having computer problems? Are they calling from a quiet location? Here are some topics we recommend using and some language to get you started. There are literally hundreds of things you could say, but it can be helpful to have a few prepared. You’ll see that some of these are particular to virtual meetings:

Ort

  • F: Von wo aus sprechen Sie gerade?
  • A: Ich bin an meinem Schreibtisch. Wie ist es bei Ihnen?

Wetter

  • F: Wie ist das Wetter bei Ihnen? Bei uns ist es ziemlich düster!
  • A: Wir haben blauen Himmel und Sonnenschein. Hoffentlich kommt das bald zu Ihnen rüber!

Einloggen

  • F: Wie haben Sie sich eingeloggt? Ich hatte ein paar Probleme.
  • A: Es hat gut geklappt. Welche Probleme hatten Sie?

Tonqualität

  • F: Können Sie mich gut hören?
  • A: Tut mir leid, es ist etwas leise. Könnten Sie lauter sprechen?

Verbindungsqualität

  • F: Ich kämpfe hier mit einer ernsthaften Verzögerung. Wie ist es bei Ihnen?
  • A: Bei mir klappt es gut. Vielleicht ist es Ihre Internetverbindung?

Arbeit

  • F: Wie läuft es momentan im Marketing?
  • A: Ach, Sie wissen doch, beschäftigt wie immer. Wie sieht es in Ihrer Abteilung aus?

If you give lots of information in your answers, it makes it easier for the other person to ask more questions and keep the conversation going. If you just say ‘yes’ or ‘no’, it will stop the conversation. If you’re asking questions, remember to use open questions so that they can’t be answered with “yes” or “no”.

More on this topic can be found in our Using Collaborative Technologies Seminar. Do you have any tips you’d like to share on how to build empathy and rapport in your virtual team meetings? Let us know in the comments area below.

 

Losing my mind on a deserted island: My challenges of working virtually

No, I don’t think I am really losing my mind, but some days I feel like it.  As Head of Sales for Target Training I work virtually each day. This means that I am working at clients’ offices, on a train or at home in my office.  I am constantly emailing, messaging, phoning and videoconferencing with my colleagues.  There are weeks where I don’t see any of my colleagues in person. I love the flexibility and autonomy of working virtually. There are a lot of advantages and it fits my lifestyle.  This way of working is becoming the norm for many professionals and with it come challenges. The key is to make sure you address the challenges before they start to affect your, and your team’s productivity.

New Call-to-action hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘0455f399-a600-43a9-848f-986da3f8ea8e’, {});

I was in a client meeting a few weeks back discussing a virtual teams training project with a department leader.  We were looking into his team’s struggles in an effort to customize our training approach.  During our talk, he used the phrase ‘…with everyone working on their own little deserted island..’  when he was discussing his virtual team spread over 5 countries.  It struck me as a great analogy and got me thinking about my team.

So, I took a few minutes and wrote down the biggest challenges I personally face when working virtually.  I recommend doing the same as the exercise helped me raise awareness of what is happening and what I can do to improve things.  I had quite a long list after 10 minutes, but here are the three main struggles I thought I’d share:

1. Trust

Trusting the people that you work with is essential.  Without trust; conflict, misunderstanding and communication breakdowns occur.  In my opinion, trust is something that comes from two people investing in their working relationship.  This can be purely professional or a mix of personal and professional.  Trust can mean different things to different people, but I think most people would agree that it is easier to build when you see someone face to face on a regular basis.  You don’t always have that luxury when working in dispersed teams.  Building trust takes more effort and work.  What can you do to build trust in your virtual teams?

2. Email etiquette

Love them or hate them, emails aren’t going anywhere no matter what you might have heard or read. Emails can be a great way to quickly distribute information all over the world to a number of people.  They can also easily offend, frustrate and demotivate colleagues due to the smallest word, phrase or omission of something.  When you don’t have the ability to see someone face to face when communicating, you need to make sure your message and tone reflect what you are trying to say.  Even then, the reader may interpret things differently based what is happening on their ‘deserted island’ that particular day.  What should you do?  Use the phone when in doubt and establish some email rules for your virtual teams. 

3. Unnecessary virtual meetings/calls

There are different opinions out there on whether to have weekly catch up meetings scheduled or not, regardless of urgent discussion points. In my opinion, the fewer the calls the better.  My schedule changes quickly and needs to flexible to accommodate client demands.  So, when I see a weekly call on my calendar I look at it as a barrier to productivity, unless it is about something to move a project forward.  What can your team do instead of the weekly teleconferences?

 

As a kid, I used to fantasize about being on my own deserted island and doing what I wanted, the way I wanted, every day. That is my current reality, minus the beach. Working virtually is reality for most us and taking a few steps to improve our communication and relationships goes a long way. Give a few of the tips included in the links above a try and see how it goes!

 

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Read more on virtual teams on our blog. Or download our popular eBook below.

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

 

 

After the meeting ends – more practical ideas from great chair persons and facilitators we’ve worked with

In last week’s post What to do before the meeting begins – 4 added-value ideas from great chair persons and facilitators we’ve worked with we shared 4 great techniques we’ve picked up from experienced chairpersons and facilitators during meeting facilitation seminars. This post keeps sharing the sharing. As trainers, we get to listen to and learn from our clients – and then you get to benefit from not only our knowledge and experience, but their’ s too!  So here are 5 easy-to-implement ideas to make you an even better chair or facilitator AND make your meetings that much more effective.

Making the time to debrief the process

Taking the time after the meeting to talk about how the meeting went means you can continually improve not just your skills, but the effectiveness and efficiency of your meetings too. Debriefing is all about identifying behaviours to maintain and things to do differently during the following meetings – and top performing teams take the time to reflect.  You could integrate it into your agenda  or agree upon reflection intervals.  My own experience is that immediacy  is better.  When asked to think about the last e.g. 6 meetings, people too often tend to either focus on the last 1 or 2 events, or speak in broad and vague generalizations that are more difficult to act upon.

Sending out minutes – each time, every time, always, no excuses, better late than never

Whether they be formal or informal, an executive summary or agenda-based, action-oriented minutes or verbatim, it’s a good idea to write them and send them out!  Great chair persons understand and commit to always having minutes.  They don’t approach them with a “we have proof” mentality – but rather with a “building” and “commitment” mentality. And they also give people an opportunity to review and add to the minutes.  But they have them.

Planning in “I should have said” time

People are wonderfully different – and this means that not everyone is going to contribute equally in your meetings.  It could simply be shyness, or perhaps an issue of interpersonal dynamics or politics.  More often than not it could be that an idea or opinion wasn’t fully formed and the person chose to think it through before speaking (especially if they have what the MBTI refers to as an “Introvert” preference). It’s too easy (and destructive) to take a “If you don’t say it in the meeting you lost your chance”. Plan time after the meeting is over so participants who need time to reflect can have a chance to share their insights. This also helps to build trust.

Taking the time for tête-à-têtes

Connected to the above, planning in time after the meeting for a tête-à-tête (literally a head to head discussion) also gives you an opportunity to

  • make apologies (or gives somebody an opportunity to make them)
  • reflect on behaviours
  • ask for a recommitment to ground rules
  • clarify confusion
  • resolve conflicts
  • ask for and receive feedback,
  • check resources
  • gauge true level of commitment to tasks

… plus a hundred other things which are best done on a one-to-one basis.  It’s not politicking – it’s about building authentic relationships.

Planning in check-ins to review commitments and accountability

If people have had the chance to share their opinions and ideas and robustly discuss options in your meting then you can expect real commitment to the agreed action.  And if people have committed then you can hold them accountable. Great chair persons explicitly review the commitments at the end of the meeting AND they follow up later on.  When they follow up they have an “inquisitive” and “supportive” approach. They understand that things may have changed since the meeting, that priorities may have shifted and that resources may have been over-estimated or diverted.  But they follow up.

FOR MORE INFORMATION

Plenty more meetings where that came from… And for even more information on how to make your meetings and your performance during meetings more successful, please contact us. We love to talk!


 

Before the meeting begins – 4 added-value ideas from great chair persons and facilitators we’ve worked with

One of the best things about being a trainer is that you get to meet a lot of people from diverse backgrounds.  As trainers we get to listen to and learn from our clients – and we then get to share ideas, experiences and best practices with other clients. Below are some of the great ideas that top chairpersons and facilitators have identified over the last years during meeting facilitation seminars.

New Call-to-action

hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘cecc35f9-a547-47dd-8ee5-1f6c0374cbf5’, {});


Do you know who needs to be in the meeting and what they’ll be bringing to the table?

Before the meeting starts make a list of the decision makers, subject matter experts and opinion leaders. Then take a few minutes to isolate and identify their interests in the outcome of the meeting. Why? By doing this you’ll…

  • Know who to address about which topic when. This is especially useful if you have meeting participants who are quieter or introspective.
  • Know who to ask specific technical questions.
  • Be better able to focus the flow of information and discussion on the decision makers’ interests

Do you invest time before the meeting to talk with the participants?

This idea is too often quickly mislabelled as “politics”, but all of the truly impressive chairpersons I’ve been lucky enough to work with have stood by the idea. Great chairpersons and facilitators make the time to talk with individuals who will participate in the meeting about the meeting before the meeting begins. They do this to uncover interests, hear concerns and objections, and win support. They are then better able to connect interests, help others save face and steer discussions down constructive avenues.

I specifically remember a young project manager passionately convincing her fellow IT engineers of the merits of this behaviour and that “talking about the meeting before the meeting makes the meeting work -and that’s why we always finish our meetings earlier than planned!

Do you build your own ground rules – and review them at the start of every meeting?

Many organizations have established “meeting ground rules”. These may be unspoken, hidden away on the Intranet or printed on colourful posters and put in the meeting rooms. The advice is often solid and sensible.

But all the best chairpersons I’ve worked with have consistently supported the idea that ground rules work best when the team itself decides on their own ground rules and define acceptable meeting behaviour (for example phones on silent, poll opinions, always have an agenda, etc…).  This is especially important when working in virtual teams. When challenged by their peers that this was a waste of time answers included …

  • “The team takes the time to focus on the process and not the results. And my experience is that it’s the process that causes the frustrations 9 out of 10 times”
  • “Because everyone and every team  is different and the company rules can’t know this”
  •  “If they are our rules, and we made them, then everybody shares the responsibility for making our meetings work well”
  • “It means I don’t need to be the bad guy – because we all agreed and committed to the process up front”

Top chair persons and facilitators also tend to review them very quickly at the start of every meeting. One extroverted investment fund manager I worked with sang them and, to keep things fresh, changed the tune at least every quarter. You won’t be surprised to hear that his peers had mixed reactions to this idea (“It is not a serious idea Fabio, we are a bank!”) – but apparently his team loved it, and meeting attendance was high.

Are you building trust through building relationships and enabling “rough discussions”?

Great chairpersons and facilitators take the time before the meeting to get to know team members personally – and understand the dynamics between the participants.  This helps the chairperson;

  • understand people’ motivations and priorities (“what do they really care about?”)
  • adapt the dynamics and approach to respect he different personalities (e.g. not everybody wants to brainstorm as a group
  • adapt their own communication style e.g find the best metaphors and stories to illustrate key points,

But more importantly, as one German manager said “Rough discussions are important so we don’t keep having the same discussions again and again”.  This ties in with Patrick Lencioni’s 5 dysfunctions of a team idea that great chairpersons believe the more they know about the participants, the better they can facilitate open discussions. They’ll know when to push and when to stop, when to mine conflict in the meeting (force buried disagreements to light in order to work through them) and when to deal with issues in smaller groups. Building trust is a long-term investment, but as many meetings are chaired by the teams manager anyway it is an investment that pays off.

 

Powerful Communication – The Power of the Purpose Pyramid

listening skills target trainingThe purpose pyramid is one of the simplest and yet effective communication models for introducing a presentation, opening a meeting or organizing your thoughts that there is. It is so simple, in fact, that no one seems to take credit for it though you will find it in the work of many communications gurus. The four questions in the pyramid aren’t special by themselves, but together they offer a powerful way to connect what you want to do with the goals and needs of your organization, no matter what business you are in or function you perform. Why? + What? + How? + Who? = Alignment. The Purpose Pyramid makes it easy for you to structure your communication – in any situation.

Free Download

pyramid

Why?

Why is where you share or remind your team about the deeper meaning and purpose of the organization. This is the reason that energizes you and your colleagues as well as your customers. What’s your why? Your purpose is best when it brings the energy of your team together and they can all see themselves in it. It should also attract internal and external customers to your work.

A band plays music, by definition – but wouldn’t you rather see a band whose purpose is to give you high energy and a memorable musical experience?

At a more nuts and bolts level, you can also apply the why to day-to-day interactions and situations. An example could be to state the purpose (why) of a meeting on the agenda for everyone to see. If there is a question about being on track, the team can refer to the mutually agreed purpose of the team.

What?

What refers to the tasks you and your team need to get done to contribute to making your purpose a reality. At their best these tasks are things you can track and observe easily so all can know when it is accomplished. For example, to have better meetings is not a clear task. Having everyone contribute to the meeting is a clear task. The SMART principle is a great model to use, just remember they should in some way contribute to achieving your purpose.

An example could be to make task identification a two-step process. Instead of automatically identifying who should complete a task at the same time as identifying the task, outline just the tasks first. Going through the how before identifying who will help team members to know what they are committing to.

How?

How is where you turn to your method, approach or process, How will you get your tasks accomplished? For example, sticking with the “better meetings” example, if my task is to have everyone contribute to a meeting, I could tell the team members I expect them to contribute and hope for the best or I could use a polling technique in the meeting to give each attendee the space to speak uninterrupted.

If a task is complex, the “how” could be a process or procedure that helps to complete the task effectively and efficiently. If you have standard operating procedures in place, this is the time to stress their use.

An example could be to identify the resources and process necessary to complete a task before asking who will do it. Leaders get a chance to offer support to the team and may encourage team members to accept a stretch task because they know how they will be supported.

Who?

Who refers to the individual and collective commitments or expectations that match your team to the tasks at hand. In most meetings the who stage tells how well we’ve done the other stages. If team members recognize and connect with their purpose, the necessity of a task and the process and resources to get it done, it’s a lot easier to agree to do them. With the clarity you’ve built earlier, it is easier for you to ask for what you want while committing to do what is necessary to support your team. A great question at the end of a meeting is “what have we agreed to do?” to check agreements without sounding like a task master.

Browse our blog for more tips and tricks

And/or let me know of any other useful communication tools that always work for you. I look forward to hearing from you!

The alternatives to a weekly update meeting

Free Download

VT posterIt’s 11:00 on Monday morning and your team, spread across the world, is about to dial in to a virtual meeting. Why? To update each other on what’s been going on over the past week, and what might happen over the next few weeks. In theory this could be really interesting, useful and beneficial, if it weren’t for the tight deadlines you have this week, and the knowledge that you’re going to be putting in a few late nights to meet them. Do you really need to spend time listening to Thierry, Namrata, and Quentin talking you through their week when you’ve got so much to do?

The reasons why weekly update meetings contribute to the success of the team’s performance

  • They keep you all in contact with each other. Emails are useful, but you don’t talk to each other. There is no real chance to build rapport and trust with your colleagues on the team.
  • They give the manager a chance to talk to and relay information to everyone at the same time.
  • Things happen in the week and everyone then knows that they have an opportunity to talk about them on this regular occasion. Unless something has to be dealt with right now, you can save it until then and not interrupt everyone during the week.
  • High performing teams help each other in difficult situations. If you don’t go to that meeting and share the fact that you are under pressure, nobody will be able to help you out. Everyone is, after all, working towards the same goals.

What makes weekly update meetings great?

There are, again, so many factors that could make these meetings great. This starts with recognizing that there are problems, and dealing with them. Here are a few suggestions:

  • If everyone is well-prepared and sticks to the agenda.
  • If everyone takes turns to speak.
  • If everyone shows interest when the others are speaking and reacts to what the speaker is saying.
  • If the language used is clear so that everyone can understand.
  • If the agenda varies from time to time. These meetings do run a risk of becoming routine. If you change the contact from time to time, this can help with the interest level.
  • If everyone commits to agreed rules.
  • If people refrain from doing other tasks at the same time as the meeting.

The alternatives to having a weekly update meeting

Do you simply want to update and be updated or do you want to help improve your team’s performance? If you’re looking for alternatives to the weekly meeting, then these options might be useful.

Email

There is definitely a time and a place for emails, and they serve the purpose of conveying information. But they can be misread, and they can also be not read. There is no interaction and you have no chance to discuss responses with everyone at the same time unless you want an inbox bombardment.

A team portal or community

A lot of organizations now have their own internal social network. You can use communities for a wide range of purposes. You may also have a portal for your team. Why not use this to post updates before the meeting and then ask team members to talk specifically about one or two of the points? Alternatively they could ask questions on the portal/community that they would like help with. If everyone else has seen the issues in advance, then they have time to think, and will have something to contribute.

What is the structure of the update?

Just like with meetings, it is useful to give team members a common structure if you decide you’ll use email or an online platform for your weekly updates. Ask yourself:

  • What do you want them to share?
  • What tasks are they working on?
  • What challenges are they facing?
  • How can the other members of the team help?
  • What are the next steps?

If you’d like to find out more about how we can help improve the way your (virtual) team works, take a look at https://www.targettraining.eu/soft-skills-trainings/?lang=de and our ebook https://hs.targettraining.eu/ebook/virtualteamschecklists

Tools for teams

High-performing teams do not spring into existence simply by giving a bunch of people a common goal. Putting together a team is easy, but making them perform to the best of their abilities is something else altogether. Having a successful team is not something that will ‘fall into place’ either – no, not even if you really, really want it to… It takes time, dedication and understanding to build an effective team, and probably a few more things besides that. 

With that said, let’s look at some tools for teams…

Go to the eBook

Meet ARCI

You’ve heard of ARCI, right? There can be a slight affirmative murmur in the training room at this point, or no sound at all. Like so many other tools, ARCI can be implemented in a variety of business scenarios. ARCI can handle large scale scenarios, as well as the smallest process. By taking a structured approach like ARCI to role assignment, you can identify who’ll be doing what and what not on each team task. If done (and followed) correctly, it minimizes the risk of overlaps and confusions. Without further ado, ARCI identifies who is:

  • Accountable – this person is the “owner” of the work. He or she must sign off or approve when the task, objective or decision is complete. This person must make sure that responsibilities are assigned in the ARCI matrix for all related activities. There is only one person accountable.
  • Responsible – these people are the “doers” of the work. They must complete the task or objective or make the decision. Several people can be jointly responsible.
  • Consulted – these are the people who need to give input before the work can be done and signed-off on. These people are “in the loop” and active participants in a task.
  • Informed – these people need updates on progress or decision, but they do not need to be formally consulted, nor do they contribute directly to the task or decision.

Here’s an example.

ROLE AROLE BROLE CROLE D
TASK 1ARCI
TASK 2ARIC
TASK 3CIAR

ARCI is one of a mountain of tools that helps you define your team. But there are others…

What type of learner are you?

Do you colour code and highlight your way through documents, or do you write notations and questions as you read? Do you prefer graphics and visuals to reinforce learning? Or do you prefer to use tunes or rhymes as mnemonic devices to remember information? Do you learn more effectively via self-study, or via group activity?

The answers to these questions matter greatly in a training environment but they are also relevant in successful teams. Long instructional emails or manuals are difficult to digest for an auditory or visual learner. Or, consider the differences between someone who learns by trial and error and someone who learns from detailed how-to examples.

What type of team member are you?

Belbin Team Type Inventory

An interesting place to start learning more how each team member can contribute to the team, is by looking at the Belbin team type inventory. The Belbin identifies nine different team roles. Each role has strengths and weaknesses, and, keeping personal preferences in mind, tasks can be distributed according to the preferred team role rather than by company hierarchy, technical skills, position or experience.

Here’s a short overview of Belbin’s 9 team roles. For a more complete description, including the typical strengths and weaknesses of each role, see here.

Resource investigator

They provide inside knowledge on the opposition and made sure that the team’s idea will carry to the outside world.

Teamworker

Helps the team to gel, using their versatility to identify the work required and complete it on behalf of the team.

Co-ordinator

Needed to focus on the team’s objectives, draw out team members and delegate work appropriately

Plant

Tends to be highly creative and good at solving problems in unconventional ways.

Monitor Evaluator

Provides a logical eye, making impartial judgements where required and weighs up the team’s options in a dispassionate way.

Specialist

Brings in-depth knowledge of a key area to the team.

Shaper

Provides the necessary drive to ensure that the team keep moving and do not lose focus or momentum.

Implementer

Needed to plan a workable strategy and carry it out as efficiently as possible.

Completer Finisher

Most effectively used at the end of tasks to polish and scrutinise the work for errors, subjecting it to the highest standards of quality control.

Read more about Belbin here.

What is your team’s type?

Myers-Briggs Type Indicator

Years and years of study and research went into the Myers-Briggs Type Indicator (MBTI). I will not be able to do it justice with this short summary. (Start here, if you want to learn more about MBTI. If you are interested in creating an MBTI profile, keep in mind that the MBTI is a three step process, and should be performed by a certified MBTI practitioner.)

“If people differ systematically in what they perceive and in how they reach conclusions, then it is only reasonable for them to differ correspondingly in their interests, reactions, values, motivations, and skills.”

C. G. Jung

The combined individual profiles of team members can be translated into a team type indicator. Here’s an example of a team with the team identity ESTJ. The first graphic explains the combined strengths of the team members – these are the behaviours that come naturally to them.

MBTIteamprofile

 

And then there’s the flipside. The same team identifies as being INFP. This graphic shows the areas this team needs to be aware of because its team members don’t naturally exhibit them.

MBTIteamprofileflipside

Whereas Belbin’s focus is on the balance of team roles and tasking, the MBTI profile is about raising awareness of each other’s preferences and understanding their preferred way of working and communicating. The emphasis is on preferred. Many factors can influence someone’s behaviour in business. It’s not as simple as placing someone in a box of type, or finding the right balance of different types in your team. There is no right balance of type. Every team can work, if you’re interested in knowing who you’re working with.

A short personal disclaimer

I’m not certified in Belbin or MBTI, but some of my colleagues are. They can tell you much, much more, if the mighty Internet doesn’t give you all the answers. I’m not an expert on any of these tools, but I have found them very useful in the various teams I have worked in.

 

The elements of effective teams

In order to be effective your team needs a number of key elements to be present. Elements such as clarity of purpose, shared awareness of roles and constructive communication. These elements are not difficult to achieve but they do take focus and effort. Take a moment and ask yourself two simple questions – How many teams are you currently part of?  And how effective are these teams?  The first question is easy, but the second? Working in teams is so common for many of us that we just don’t take the time to reflect on how effectively we are actually performing – and so we miss an opportunity to develop ourselves, our team and our impact on our organization’s goals. Researchers have shown over and over again, that these elements are essential for effective teams. Businesses which recognize their importance and work at maintaining them, are rewarded with teams that consistently perform and achieve their targets. Ignoring them leads to unachieved goals, wasted potential and demotivated staff.

New Call-to-action hbspt.cta.load(455190, ‘0455f399-a600-43a9-848f-986da3f8ea8e’, {});

 

What does an effective team look like?

Here’s a simple tool we use when running workshops with existing teams. Some of these questions are hopefully familiar, but too often we see goal-oriented teams typically neglect the softer aspects explored by questions 8-10. Select one team of which you are currently a member.  Now ask yourself the following questions, rating on a 1 to 5 scale, with 1 being low and 5 being high:

  1. Do we have a clearly defined purpose?
  2. Are our roles and responsibilities well-defined, understood and followed?
  3. Do we have the tools and resources we need to achieve our objectives?
  4. Do we listen to each other?
  5. Do we all actively participate in problem solving?
  6. Do we work constructively through conflict?
  7. Does our team leader approve of our work, providing relevant and specific feedback on whether we are meeting expectations?
  8. Do we work and learn together?
  9. Do we take time out to assess our progress?
  10. Would we work together on another team?

Your score

Effective teams should be expecting to score 40+.  Outstanding teams score 45+.  What did you score? And what are you going to do now? Why not check out Target Training’s seminar on building effective teams?  Click here for more information.

Quick and Easy Recipe for ‘Tasty’ Teleconferences

 

Free Download

sweet16

Intercall is one of the world’s largest international conference call company. And Intercall’s own research showed that more than 60 percent of respondents admitted to doing something else while on a conference call. This “doing something else” is one of the key contributors to ineffective teleconferences.

I think it is safe to say many of us would like to improve our teleconferences at work. Many of them are unfortunately either too long, not focused enough, or generally unproductive. So what can you do? I’m a terrible cook but I like to try cooking something once in a while. One thing that makes it easier is to have a clear, easy-to-follow recipe to use. This got me thinking. Why can’t we have simple recipes for business topics such as teleconferences? I know that not all teleconferences are the same, but here is my attempt at a recipe for a good starting point for a teleconference.

Ingredients

  • 2 or more well-prepared and lively team members
  • Working phones and computers
  • An agenda
  • A clearly defined moderator
  • A clearly defined minute taker
  • Listening skills
  • Focus – as in not being part of the 60% who are doing something else during the call!
  • Participation
  • Coffee(optional)

Instructions

  1. Mix your team members, phones, and computers lightly until energized. Make sure the technology is working the way it will be needed and the team members are ready. Add coffee here if needed.
  2. Take the agenda, combine it with the moderator and use this to begin the call. Make sure the call starts on time and the moderator leads everyone through the agenda as efficiently as possible. Also, take the minute taker out of its package at this time and activate it.
  3. Pour in the participation, focus and listening skills from all during the call. This is important as it will give the necessary flavour needed to make your call productive. Bake this for 15-30 minutes (depending on the time given for the call). IMPORTANT: do not over-bake i.e. go over the agreed time, as this will cause a sour or bitter taste for all involved.
  4. Shake and clean the call by having the moderator summarize the key points, confirm the action items that need to be done and by whom, and schedule the next call.
  5. Let the call sit for a few hours to cool after baking. Then, have the minute taker send out the minutes to the participants, and those who could not be on the call to ensure long lasting flavour.
  6. Enjoy the tasty results of a productive teleconference!

By following this recipe, hopefully your calls won’t turn out as bad as my lasagne usually does.

Successful teleconferences aren’t difficult to have, but it does take a little effort by everyone to ensure consistent, productive success.

Good luck with yours and happy cooking!

Learning to listen: lessons from baseball, TED talks and an alien life form

How well do you listen?

Sound matters. In work. In life. Sometimes we forget that. I heard a story recently that was told by a former Major League Baseball player. He talked about a manager he once played for. During practice, the manager would put players in the outfield with their backs to home plate. A batter would stand at home plate and have someone pitch the baseball to him. Baseball bats are made of wood and are roughly 30-34 inches long. The cork-filled, leather-covered ball is thrown anywhere from 80-100 miles per hour. The batter would swing the bat and hit the ball. Now here is the important part:

Free downloadalf

 

Because the player in the outfield had their backs to home plate they had to train their ear to know what part of the field the ball was travelling to, based on the sound created when the baseball made contact with the bat. If you’ve ever seen a baseball game (or cricket) you know you can hear when a ball is hit solidly. But you can’t determine where it is going to travel. This manager wanted his players to hear the contact, and make a split-second decision to race to the position they believed the ball was going, without even seeing it. With practice, players knew exactly where the hit ball was going.

They had to learn to listen.

Are we “losing our listening”?

TED, the great, freely accessible online source for learning, has what I think are two of the best talks around on how to achieve excellent communication. Both are by Julian Treasure, author of an excellent book on the impact sound has on our working lives called ‘Sound Business,’ and both are well-worth watching. In one, he talks about speaking well and in the other, the one I suggest below, he talks to us about listening.

Of his five tips on how to listen better, the final one – an acronym, of course – RASA, the Sanskrit word for ‘juice’ or essence’ is exactly that when it comes to business communication: listening is important, it’s the essence of effective business communication. RASA stands for:

Receive

That is, actually pay attention to what they’re saying.

Appreciate

By making natural small noises or utterances like, “ah” or “hmm” or “okay.” You may have also heard it referred to as active listening.

Summarise

Very crucial to all sorts of business communication, from presentations to negotiations and everything in between. Here it’s critical you are authentic and summarise what you heard – NOT what you wanted to hear.

Ask

And finally, ask questions. Find out more. Learn as much as you can about a situation, a trend, a project, a risk, or an opportunity.

ALF

Learning to listen starts with recognizing all the barriers we create for ourselves. This is where ALF comes in, and no, we’re not talking about the sitcom character that chased cats. ALF means Always Listen First. Julian Treasure warns us at the beginning of his TED talk that ‘we are losing our listening.’

Don’t lose yours. Listen like a Major League player. And Always Listen First.