How experienced presenters do it

There are presenters out there who seem to have it all. They speak, the audience listens. They make a joke, the audience laughs. They don’t umm, they don’t ahhh, and they speak clearly, sharing their message and reinforcing it just enough throughout. By the end of the presentation, their audience is informed, educated and leaves the room with all their questions answered. How? This blog shares 4 simple tips and includes 4 extremely useful presentation eBooks.

Contact us now

Know your whats and whys

This is incredibly obvious, perhaps even to inexperienced presenters – but it probably the most overlooked element during the design stage. When you ask them, experienced presenters tell you that the very first thing they do is crystallize what they want to achieve with the presentation.

These questions will help you get started:

  1. What do I want to achieve?
  2. Why should people listen to me?
  3. What do I want the audience to know after the presentation?

An excellent tip is to write down in a single sentence what your presentation is about and why you are presenting. If you can’t do it in 14 words or less, rewrite it – and one of the 14 words needs to be the powerful “so”. e.g.  “I’m sharing how experienced presenters do it, so you can improve your presentations.” That sentence then gives you a very simple framework and clear criteria for what I want to put in and take out.

„Designing your presentation well lays the foundations for your success.“

Scott Levey

Powerpoint doesn’t make the presentation

Perhaps the comedic writers Steve Lowe and Brendan McArthur[1] best summed it up – „PowerPoint: The Microsoft tool that encourages people to think and talk like ********s.“ You make the presentation. Powerpoint is a supporting tool. We’ve all done it. We find a set of existing slides and copy and paste our way to a new presentation. We think in slides and we build what we say around what’s on the slides. Experienced presenters build the presentation slides after they have planned the presentation, when they know what they are going to say and have a clear structure in mind. They use as few slides as possible because they want the focus on them and their message. This way, the presentation has a better chance of becoming a visual aid, rather than the main feature.

New Call-to-action

Get comfortable

Have you noticed it? The best presenters are in control and entirely comfortable with what they’re doing. Wow. How do they do it? They practice. Out loud, probably. Practicing is not thinking to yourself what you will say – it’s actually saying it. Recording yourself and practicing in front of a mirror will tell you exactly what your audience will see and hear as you present your content. When you come across as unsure of yourself or uncertain of your content you are creating barriers to success. And don’t focus on “learning it by heart” – focus on the big messages and the important bridges.

“Practice your presentation a day before you hold it -if you start practising an hour before you run the risk of deciding to change things around which makes things harder.

James Culver

 

eBook: The definitive checklist for qualifying training providers

Don’t lose yourself, but if you do…

Your mind draws a blank. You’ve forgotten to make an important point. You just realized you’re babbling away. You don’t know the answer to the question. The audience looks at you like they don’t quite understand what you’re trying to say. Now what?

We all make mistakes and “owning your mistakes” helps build credibility . Smile. Don’t wind yourself up. Move forward. Say it later. Focus on the next point. Say that you’ll find out the answer but you don’t have it right now. Ask the audience – what have you understood so far? – and take it from there.

Moments when things go wrong happen – so remember they are only moments. Even the most experienced presenters draw a blank sometimes. If you look carefully, you’ll see that they have developed techniques that work for them (they take a sip of water while gathering their thoughts, they make a joke out of it, etc.). Experience taught them that.

New Call-to-action

If you’d like to benefit from practical training then take a look at our training solutions for presenting across cultures, presenting in a virtual environment and our challenging Presenting with IMPACT


[1] Is It Just Me or Is Everything Shit?: Insanely Annoying Modern Things – By Steve Lowe and Alan McArthur with Brendan Hay (Grand Central Publishing)

Nobody likes giving negative feedback – but many of us want to hear it

If someone is unhappy with your performance at work, wouldn’t you want to know? At the very least, you’d like an opportunity to clear the air, or address the problem, or explain…or something. Yet when it comes to giving negative or difficult feedback, most of us feel reluctant to give it. We don’t want to hurt the other person or we are afraid of a conflict, so we end up avoiding it. No, giving negative feedback is not one of the enjoyable aspects of managing people. Doing it constructively is a challenge for the best of us, and even when we do it well – who’s to say that your feedback is taken on board and improvements are made?

The big (free) eBook of negotiations language

Here are 7 tips to get you started, and they are explained in more detail below:

  1. Be clear about what you want at the end before you begin
  2. Use language that focuses on the situation, not on the person
  3. Turn up to the conversation, stay there and speak out
  4. Be open, try to be objective, don’t judge
  5. Demonstrate understanding
  6. Give examples and share patterns – and the impact on you/others
  7. Believe in change

Be clear about what you want at the end before you begin

What is obvious to you is not always obvious to others. People cannot look into your head (or heart) and guess how you’d like things. You need to be able to explain, in simple and safe language, what you want from the conversation and why you are starting it. Think about it, picture it. Simply saying that you want something to improve is not enough, it means different things to different people. Be specific and focus on the future. A useful approach is to know if this is an A, B or C discussion.  Are you focusing on a specific Action, an ongoing Behaviour or possible Consequences ? Try not to mix them. Another approach my colleagues use in training is “feed forward not back”.

And finally, think about this: if you’re giving negative feedback because you want to ‘make a point’ – there really is no point.

Use language that focuses on the situation, not on the person

Giving negative feedback is always a very personal thing, for both parties. Keep this is in mind when the other person takes your feedback personal. There are no magic phrases to use when giving negative feedback but avoid language like “you did” and “you shouldn’t have”. Owning your sentence with “I” is a better place than judging or blaming with “you”. Try sentences that start with “I noticed” or “I saw”. Avoid using „I think“ or “I heard” as this implies a personal feeling, gossip, and/or judgement. Do keep in mind though that the “I” isn’t magic. If you are blaming somebody, the “I” doesn’t change how they react. And if you are managing people consider sometimes using “our” or “we” as a replacement for “I”.

Given time to absorb and reflect, most of us are grown-up enough to move past the personal impact of what is being said. More often than not, once we look back on the situation, we’re glad that someone gave us the feedback and brought it to our attention so that we can try to change our behaviour, or take appropriate action.

Turn up to the conversation, stay there and speak out

If you are going to give difficult or negative feedback you need to be present in the moment. You are committed to the conversation because you believe both parties will benefit. Shut out unhelpful self-talk like “well it won’t make any difference” or “ I knew he would say that when I said this“.  You both need to focus on this conversation and the outcome. You owe it to both of you to say what you think and feel, taking responsibility for your words and the outcome.

Be open, try to be objective, don’t judge

Don’t be vague, don’t be ambiguous. If the situation is a big deal, don’t call it a minor issue. Be open to receiving feedback on your feedback. Listening is as important as talking. Effective feedback is always a two-way street. And remember, what is obvious to others is not always obvious to you.

It’s almost never a good idea to judge others by your standards. You would do this or that, if you were him or her in this situation? You’re not him or her, you’re you. Or, he or she should do this or that in this situation? Better yet, if you were him or her, you wouldn’t even be in this situation… None of that means anything, beyond that you are different people.

Demonstrate understanding

For feedback to lead to a positive outcome for both sides you need to demonstrate understanding.  You can do this by …

  • Actively looking to find truth and agreement in what they are saying and validating this.  If you disagree with everything they say, how likely is it that they will accept and embrace everything you are saying?
  • Keep calm, centred and actively side-step confrontation and escalation.
  • Summarize your understanding of the other persons feelings (and be open to them correcting you).
  • Summarize your understanding of what they have said (and again, they can correct you)
  •  Asking a straight question to build bridges

Give examples and share patterns – and the impact on you/others

Your vested interest and understanding of the situation are important and this should be clear early in the conversation. Models such as DESC build this in. If you are not clear about something, ask and listen. Stick to what was observed. And as mentioned earlier, know whether you want to focus on an action, a pattern of behaviours  or consequences.

Trainer tip

“When we talk about patterns of behaviour, people will typically ask for an example. You are obliged to give examples- but if somebody is behaving defensively be prepared for them to then pull the example apart (challenge facts, bring in new information that may or may not be relevant, argue it was a unique situation). Your task is to listen, learn AND keep the conversation focussed on the pattern, not on single events or actions.“

Believe in change, support change

The words you say, your thoughts, your body language – if you don’t believe this change can happen, it probably won’t. You are a part of this change. You are, in fact, one of the initiators. More often than not, you can do more than give negative feedback. For change to work, it can’t come at a cost of something else and it often isn’t the responsibility of only one person to make the change. Look to create a “safe” environment where change is made easier.

And finally, not every moment needs to be a feedback moment

Sometimes people are having a rough time, sometimes problems do correct themselves. Not everything needs to be addressed, not every situation is a feedback or learning moment. Sometimes choosing not to give negative feedback is okay too – unless avoiding it comes at a cost (e.g. your frustration, team spirit, the problem escalates). Not giving difficult or negative feedback doesn’t mean saying nothing and doing nothing. Try a different approach – the feed forward method focuses the discussion on common goals and what you need to see done differently going forward. Use the  CIA model (Control, Influence, Accept) to determine which parts apply to this situation – and finding techniques that will help you move past it, without giving negative feedback.

 

Delivering your first virtual presentation – useful tips for beginners

No matter which system you are using, many people find their first virtual presentation to be an uncomfortable experience. Firstly, remember that the fundamentals behind what makes an effective presentation are generally transferable. Secondly, making changes to the way you plan your virtual presentation is where you set the scene for success. In a previous blog post“Your first virtual presentation – practical planning tips for beginners“, we looked at some key questions, including “How am I going to keep their attention in a virtual presentation environment?”, “What can I do in advance to feel more comfortable?” and the dreaded “What if something goes wrong with the technology?”. This post focuses on tips for actually delivering your first virtual presentation.  Contact us now

Build all-round confidence in the technology when you start

Start by demonstrating to yourself (and others) that the technology is working. This could be as simple as “Before we begin I want to take 30 seconds to check everybody is up and running technology-wise”. Check people can see the same thing, that they can hear you, and you can hear them. If you are expecting people to use other system functions e.g. comments, then this is the stage where you clarify this.

Remember that body language and eye-contact are even more important when presenting virtually

  • Position the camera so that either a) your audience has a good close up of your face, allowing them to see your eyes, smile and other facial movements, or, b) your upper torso so they can see your posture, arms and hands. Avoid the dead zone of  “head and shoulders”. They’ll see your head but can’t see the important facial details, nor the arms and hands.
  • When presenting look directly into your camera and not at the person you are talking to (as this will look as if you are actually looking away from them!). Although you won’t be making eye contact, the “illusion of eye contact” is important when presenting virtually.
  • If possible present standing with your laptop and camera at head-height. Its hard to maintain energy levels sat down.
  • If you are going to use notes, then have your notes at eye-height. Do not put your notes on your desk.  Looking at the top of your head doesn’t help your audience feel connected with you.
  • Always use a headset whenever possible. Mobile phones rob you of your hands and body language. And try to avoid talking over a speaker phone as this always impacts sound quality.

Virtual presentations aren’t natural for many of us at the very beginning.  I recall a purchaser sharing that “she felt like an idiot talking to herself”. But as with any communication skill if you integrate tips and advice and practice, practice, practice then they become less daunting and more effective.  Plan, practice and perfect -your audience will thank you.

Focus on bringing life and intimacy into your voice

  • Make an extra effort to speak with enthusiasm – if you sound nervous/ awkward/disengaged what are you expecting them to feel?
  • Use your hands naturally when you are speaking (even if the camera is focusing just on your face). Again, it will help you sound more natural and human. It will also help you feel more comfortable and confident.
  • Smile when you are presenting – even if the cameras aren’t on! This may sound strange but we can hear smiles, and a smile will always come through in your voice.
  • Consciously vary your pitch, volume and speed. If you are tend to speak fast then slow down for effect. Make your voice interesting to listen to.
  • Actively use pauses and “uhmms”. This remind your audience that this is a “live” presentation and that you aren’t a recording.

Build intimacy through questions and answers

  • Make a presentation – don’t read from your slides. Your audience can read faster than they can listen.
  • Encourage and take questions during the presentation. This is a huge step as it makes the interaction feel more personal, natural and fluid.
  • Use your audience’s names whenever possible. Again, this helps to make the presentation feel more conversational plus will strengthen their attention
  • Look for examples that create personal connections. This will make your presentation sound more like a dialogue vs. monologue.

And the most simple but often forgotten …

  • Keep a glass of water at your side. You’ll need it
  • And you’ll get better with practice!

 

 

6 Gründe, warum Sie Jargon aus Ihren Präsentationen beseitigen sollten

Bei Präsentationen geht es darum, Ihre Botschaft effizient an Ihr Publikum zu kommunizieren. Sie möchten als Autorität in Ihrem Bereich angesehen werden. Sie könnten denken, dass die Verwendung von Jargon – Kurzwörter, die in Unternehmen verwendet werden, die in bestimmten Branchen tätig sind – Ihr Publikum beeindrucken und es zum Mitmachen anregen wird. Es ist jedoch wahrscheinlicher, dass sie den gegenteiligen Effekt bewirken, besonders wenn die zweite Sprache Ihres Publikums Englisch ist. Target Training hat zuvor über den Einsatz von Stille in Präsentationen gesprochen, und das Gleiche gilt für die Beseitigung von Fachjargon. Um mehr zu erfahren, lesen Sie weiter…

New Call-to-action

 

1. Sie werden schwer zu verstehen sein

Im Kontext einer Arbeitsumgebung fungieren Fachbegriffe als Abkürzung zwischen den Teammitgliedern, die sie schneller arbeiten lassen. Forbes äußerte, dass es eine schnelle Art der Kommunikation ist. Aber wenn Sie Präsentationen in anderen Abteilungen oder für Personen außerhalb Ihres Unternehmens halten, sind es nur Worte, die sich in der Regel kompliziert und abschreckend anhören. Menlo Coaching betonte, dass Sie genau das sagen müssen, was Sie meinen – mit Worten und Phrasen, die Ihr Publikum leicht verstehen wird. Versuchen Sie also so genau, wie möglich zu sein.

2. Ihre Präsentation wird keinen Wiedererkennungswert haben

Selbst wenn es Leute im Publikum gibt, die mit den von Ihnen verwendeten Fachbegriffen vertraut sind, werden sie Sie durchschauen. Sie könnten die Vorstellung bekommen, dass Sie Schlagworte verwenden, um das Thema (und sich selbst) beeindruckender zu machen. Sie werden von Ihrer Präsentation später nichts Neues mitgenommen haben. Wenn Sie wirklich Jargon verwenden müssen, stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie ausführlich darlegen, was Sie zu erklären versuchen oder geben Sie ein Beispiel.

3. Jargon wird die Meinung über Sie beeinträchtigen

Wenn Sie der Projektleiter sind und Ihr Team unterrichten, könnte der Gebrauch von Jargon sie demoralisieren. Im besten Fall werden sie Sie als jemanden ansehen, der nicht rücksichtsvoll genug ist, um einen Vortrag zu halten, den sie klar und leicht verstehen können.

4. Ihr Publikum wird gelangweilt

Wenn Ihre Präsentation durch zu viel Fachjargon unverständlich wird, wird bald Langeweile aufkommen. Ihre Gedanken werden zu Themen wandern, die mehr Priorität haben. Es kann auch dazu führen, dass Zuschauer anfangen zu plaudern, und somit Geräusche erzeugen, die andere ablenken könnten. Gewinnen Sie ihre Aufmerksamkeit, indem Sie Wörter auf eine sinnvolle, aber neue Art und Weise aneinanderreihen, die sie zuvor noch nicht gehört haben. Man muss kreativ – und vielleicht auch unterhaltsam – sein, um die Aufmerksamkeit des Publikums zu gewinnen.

5. Sie werden Ihr Publikum verlieren

Wenn Sie versuchen, die Mitglieder im Publikum zu einem bestimmten Ziel zu bringen, werden Sie sie sowohl aus emotionaler als auch aus logischer Sicht verlieren. Selbst wenn sie die Botschaft verstanden haben, werden sie nicht den Antrieb haben, diese zu verinnerlichen. Leadership-Trainer Alan Matthews empfiehlt, die Botschaft konkret zu formulieren und Ihrem Publikum die Möglichkeit zu geben, die notwendigen Aktionen/Antworten zu formulieren. Dadurch fühlen sie sich persönlich in die Präsentation eingebunden.

6. Die Präsentation wird die Zeit der Zuhörer verschwenden

Die Verwendung von allgemeinen und nicht-kontextuellen Phrasen, die das Publikum verwirren, wird es so aussehen lassen, als ob Sie nur leiern. Sie müssen die Neubewertung Ihrer Präsentation priorisieren. Filtern Sie den ganzen Jargon heraus und versuchen Sie, die Anzahl der Wörter in jedem Satz zu begrenzen, um ihre grundlegende Bedeutung zu vermitteln. Mitglieder des Publikums könnten Sie bitten, einige Elemente näher zu erläutern, aber das ist besser, als sie in einer Flut von Business-Sprache ertrinken zu lassen.

Wenn Sie immer noch der Meinung sind, dass Ihr Fachjargon effektiv ist, senden Sie zumindest eine Umfrage an das Publikum, um einen Eindruck von Ihrem Präsentationsstil zu bekommen. Wenn es ein Missverhältnis zwischen den Botschaften, die Sie vermitteln, und ihren Wahrnehmungen zu geben scheint, dann ist es vielleicht an der Zeit, das Jargon-Glossar aus dem Fenster zu werfen.

Über den Autor

Jean Browne arbeitet als Forscher und Fact-Checker für eine Karriere Coaching Firma in England. Gelegentlich nimmt sie an öffentlichen Reden teil, wenn sie Seminare hält. In ihrer Freizeit arbeitet sie freiberuflich unter anderem als Event-Host und Bingo-Caller.

Virtuelle Vortragsweise: Erste Schritte

Obwohl viele Fachleute, Manager und Trainingsmanager von Virtual Delivery wissen, gibt es immer noch einige Unklarheiten darüber, was es ist und wie es funktioniert.  Hier sind einige häufige Fragen, die uns gestellt werden, wenn wir unsere Kunden bei der Integration von virtuellem Training in ihre Lernstrategien unterstützen.

Was meinen wir, wenn wir über virtuelles Training oder virtuelle Vortragsweise sprechen?

Virtuelles Training ist ein Training, bei dem sich einer oder mehrere der Teilnehmer nicht im selben Raum wie der Trainer befinden. Die Schulung erfolgt über eine der vielen „Unified Communication Plattformen“. Dieser Begriff umfasst Webkonferenz-Tools wie WebEx Training Center, Adobe Connect, Go Meeting oder Skype for Business sowie Videokonferenzdienste wie BlueJeans oder Polycom.

Virtuelles Training wird oft als eine internationale Lösung angesehen. So haben wir beispielsweise eine virtuelle Sitzung mit einem Trainer aus Frankfurt am Main und Teilnehmern aus Hawaii, Boston, Luxemburg und Singapur durchgeführt. Wenn Sie jedoch einen Trainer an einem Standort haben und Teilnehmer am selben Ort/im selben Land, aber in verschiedenen Räumen sind –  dann ist das auch virtuelles Training.

Inwiefern unterscheidet sich virtuelles Training von E-Learning oder Webinaren?

Diese Begriffe werden oft von der Marketingabteilung eines Trainingsanbieters definiert, aber normalerweise stimmen die meisten Fachleute für Lernen & Entwicklung folgendem zu:

  • E-Learning wird vom Lernenden geleitet und es gibt keinen Live-Trainer.  Das Lernen erfolgt im Selbststudium durch die Interaktion mit einem computergestützten Lernprogramm. Ein einfaches Beispiel ist Duolingo als App für das Sprachenlernen. SkillSoft ist ein Beispiel für E-Learning zur Entwicklung Ihrer Soft Skills.
  • Ein Webinar wird von einem Sprecher geleitet und hat wahrscheinlich etwa 50 Zuhörer – obwohl einige Webinare Hunderte im Publikum haben. Das Webinar wird über Video oder eine Videokonferenzplattform online durchgeführt und der Referent spricht die meiste Zeit. Am Ende hat er oder sie die Möglichkeit, Fragen zu beantworten, und wenn sie einen Moderator beauftragen, können interaktive Momente gestalten werden, z.B. um Input über eine Umfrage während des Webinars zu erlangen.
  • Virtuelles Training ist ein Trainer plus Teilnehmer. Im Idealfall ist das Training interaktiv, engagiert und an die Bedürfnisse der Teilnehmer angepasst.

Was bietet Ihnen das virtuelle Training, was ein Webinar nicht bietet?

Einfach ausgedrückt, geht es beim virtuellen Training um Lernen durch Interaktion, Engagement und Personalisierung – es ist aktives Lernen. Dazu gehört das Lernen vom Trainer, das Lernen aus persönlichen Erfahrungen und das Lernen voneinander z.B. über Diskussionen und Erfahrungsaustausch. Webinare sind vergleichbar mit Vorträgen oder Online-Präsentationen – das Lernen ist passiv und basiert ausschließlich auf dem Sprecher und den Inhalten, die er teilt.

Wie viele Teilnehmer können Sie virtuell zur gleichen Zeit trainieren?

Überraschenderweise gehen viele Personen davon aus, dass ‚virtuell‘ auch mehr Teilnehmer bedeutet.  Dies basiert oft auf Erfahrungen in Webinaren mit mehr als 50 Personen. In einem Präsenztraining würden wir nie versuchen, 50 Teilnehmer im selben Raum zu schulen.  Typischerweise empfehlen wir 8-12 Teilnehmer, wobei 14 ein Maximum ist.  Jahrelange Erfahrung hat uns gezeigt, dass eine ideale Zahl für interaktives virtuelles Training etwa 6-8 Personen sind. Mit einer kleinen Gruppe wie dieser können Sie sicherstellen, dass Menschen die Möglichkeit haben, auf eine intimere Art und Weise miteinander zu interagieren, indem Sie Optionen wie ‚Breakout-Rooms‘ nutzen, die in den funktionelleren Plattformen wie WebEx Training Center oder Adobe Connect zu finden sind. Diese Pausenräume bieten die gleichen Vorteile wie die Integration von Kleingruppenaktivitäten in einen Schulungsraum. Diese Interaktion ist wirklich wichtig, denn ein Großteil des Wertes des Trainings, ob virtuell oder persönlich, ist die Interaktion, die die Teilnehmer miteinander haben. Sie lernen nicht nur vom Trainer, sondern auch voneinander!

Was ist ein Produzent und warum brauchen wir einen?

Ein Produzent sorgt für einen reibungslosen Ablauf des virtuellen Trainings und unterstützt den virtuellen Trainer dabei, ein interaktives, personalisiertes und vor allem reibungsloses Trainingserlebnis zu bieten. Dies ermöglicht es dem Trainer, bis zu 50% größere Trainingsgruppen zu verwalten, z.B. 8-12 Teilnehmer. Zu ihren Aufgaben gehören:

  • technische Unterstützung der Teilnehmer vor, während und nach dem Training
  • Einrichtung von Breakout-Räumen, Umfragen etc.
  • Monitoring von Engagement und Beiträgen in Chats und Break-Out-Räumen
  • Aktivitäten gestalten
  • Zeitkontrollen mit dem Trainer und den Teilnehmern

For more information

Bei Target Training bieten wir alle unsere Lösungen auch in einem virtuellen Format an. Dazu gehören internes Business English mit unserem Virtual InCorporate Trainer, Präsentieren in einem virtuellem Umfeld und Leiten von virtuellen Teams. Wenn Sie mehr über unsere virtuellen Lösungen erfahren möchten, Zeit und Geld sparen und Ihren Schulungsumfang erweitern möchten, dann kontaktieren Sie uns einfach.

Virtuelles Training vs. Präsenztraining: Wie sieht es im Vergleich aus?

James Culver ist Partner der Target Training Gmbh und verfügt über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Entwicklung maßgeschneiderter Trainingslösungen. Er war in seinen beruflichen Stationen ein HR Training Manager, ein Major der US Army National Guard und ein Dozent an der International School of Management. Er ist auch ein talentierter Perkussionist und Geschichtenerzähler. Im letzten Teil dieser Serie von Blog-Posts über die Durchführung von virutellem Training beantwortete er die folgenden Fragen…

New Call-to-action

Sie verfügen über 25 Jahre Erfahrung in der Durchführung von Schulungen. Seit wann bieten Sie virtuelles Training an?

James Seit den 90er Jahren. In den Vereinigten Staaten haben wir sehr früh mit der virtuellen Vortragsweise im Community College-System begonnen. Wir hatten oft  kleine Gruppen von Studenten an abgelegeneren Standorten, die dennoch die Vorteile von Kursen nutzen wollten, die wir auf dem Hauptcampus anbieten würden, also begannen wir, virtuelle Schulungen anzubieten. Als ich anfing, mit virtuellem Training zu arbeiten, war es extrem teuer, einen Teil dieser Arbeit zu erledigen. Unser System war im Grunde genommen eine Kameraeinrichtung und der Professor oder der Trainer sprach nur mit der Kamera. Es gab nur sehr wenig Interaktion mit den anderen Standorten und es war wie eine Art TV- Schule.

Wie sehen Sie den Vergleich von virtuellem Training zu fact-to-face Training?

James Es gibt wahrscheinlich zwei Dinge, über die man nachdenken sollte. Eines ist der Inhalt, den man vorträgt und das andere ist der Kontext. Mit Kontext meine ich alles, was den Inhalt umgibt. Wie die Dinge gemacht werden, wer mit wem interagiert und wie sie interagieren – das Gros der Kommunikation. Was den Inhalt betrifft, so sind das behandelte Thema und die geteilten Informationen auf virtueller und persönlicher Ebene gut zu vergleichen. Tatsächlich sind die virtuellen Plattformen, die wir bei Target Training einsetzen, maßgeschneidert für die Bereitstellung vieler Inhalte auf interessante Weise. Es ist sehr einfach, Videos, Aufnahmen, Whiteboards usw. hinzuzufügen. Wenn wir zum Beispiel Inhalte haben, die auf einem Slide vorbereitet und den Leuten zur Verfügung gestellt werden, können sie diese kommentieren, Fragen stellen usw. Das ist auf einer virtuellen Plattform wirklich sehr einfach..

Was meistens schwieriger ist, ist alles, was damit zu tun hat, im selben Raum wie jemand anderes zu sein: Gesichtsausdruck ändern, Körpersprache ändern. Wir sehen oder bekommen das oft nicht in einer virtuellen Umgebung mit, selbst mit den marktführenden Systemen. Die Herausforderung als Trainer besteht darin, einen großen Teil der Informationen zu verlieren, die wir von den Teilnehmern eines klassischen Präsenztrainings erhalten würden. Das ist eine harte Nuss. Als Trainer im Präsenztraining habe ich ein Gefühl dafür, wie es läuft, weil ich im Raum bin. Es ist viel schwieriger, ein Gefühl dafür zu haben, wie es läuft, wenn man sich in einer virtuellen Umgebung befindet. Und du brauchst dieses „Gefühl“, damit du dich anpassen und den Teilnehmern die bestmögliche Lernerfahrung bieten kannst..

Welche Workaround-Strategien gibt es dafür?

James Es gibt Workaround-Strategien und durch externe und interne Schulungen und On-the-job-Erfahrungen nutzen unsere Trainer diese. Eine Strategie ist, dass man viele offene und geschlossene „Check-Fragen“ stellen muss. Fragen wie „Bist du bei mir“, „Ist das klar?“, „Was sind also die Kernpunkte, die du daraus ableitest“, „Was sind deine bisherigen Fragen?“ Erfahrene virtuelle Trainer werden diese Art von Fragen alle 2 bis 3 Minuten stellen.  Im Wesentlichen hat ein Trainer ein Zeitlimit von 2 bis 3 Minuten für seinen Input, bevor er eine Check-Frage stellen sollte. Die Check-Fragen sollten sowohl offen für die Gruppe als auch für eine Einzelperson bestimmt sein.

Welche Schulungsthemen eignen sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise und welche nicht?

James Die Themen, die sich am besten für die virtuelle Vortragsweise eignen, sind diejenigen, die stärker auf Inhalte ausgerichtet sind – zum Beispiel klassische Präsentationsfähigkeiten oder virtuell ausgeführte Präsentationen.  Diese Art von Trainingslösungen konzentrieren sich auf Input, Tipps, Do’s und Don’ts, Best Practice Sharing und dann Praxis – Feedback – Praxis – Feedback etc..

Another theme that works very well for us when delivered virtually is virtual team training, whether it be working in virtual teams or leading virtual teams. By their very nature, virtual teams are dispersed so the virtual delivery format fits naturally. Plus, you are training them using the tools they need to master themselves. And of course, another benefit is if the training is for a specific virtual team the shared training experience strengthens the team itself.

Ein weiteres Thema, das für uns virtuell sehr gut funktioniert, ist das virtuelle Teamtraining, sei es in virtuellen Teams oder bei der Leitung virtueller Teams. Virtuelle Teams sind naturgemäß so verteilt, dass das virtuelle Übertragungsformat auf natürliche Weise passt. Außerdem trainieren Sie sie mit den Werkzeugen, die sie später selbst beherrschen sollten. Und natürlich ist ein weiterer Vorteil: Das Training für ein bestimmtes virtuelles Team, stärkt die gemeinsame Trainingserfahrung des Teams.

Die Arten von Trainingslösungen, die virtuell eine größere Herausforderung darstellen, sind diejenigen, bei denen wir versuchen, uns selbst oder andere zu verändern. Themen wie Durchsetzungsfähigkeit oder effektiveres Arbeiten müssen sorgfältig durchdacht und entwickelt werden, wenn sie mehr als ein Informationsdepot sein sollen. Hier ist der Coaching-Aspekt weitaus wichtiger.

Schließlich, und vielleicht überraschenderweise, kann das Management- und Führungstraining wirklich gut funktionieren, wenn es virtuell durchgeführt wird. Unsere Lösung Hochleistung zu erzielen ist ein gutes Beispiel dafür. Das Geheimnis dabei ist, das kleine Lernen zu betonen, zusätzliche Ressourcen außerhalb der Sitzung bereitzustellen, z.B. umgedrehter Unterricht (flipped classroom) mit relevanten Videos und Artikeln, und auch Möglichkeiten für Einzelgespräche zu bieten.

5 Dinge, die Sie tun können, um virtuelles Training zu einem Erfolg zu machen.

E-Learning gibt es seit 1960 und auch der „virtuelle Besprechungsraum“ ist keine neue Idee. Viele Unternehmen haben bereits Erfahrung mit dem Lernen über Online-Plattformen oder mobiles Lernen und verfügen bereits über eine Art Werkzeug, um sich zu treffen und virtuell zusammenzuarbeiten. Der Sprung vom virtuellen Meeting zum virtuellen Training scheint einfach zu sein – und das ist es, wenn man sorgfältig darüber nachdenkt, was nötig ist, um das virtuelle Training erfolgreich zu machen. Hier sind ein paar Dinge, die wir in 7 Jahren virtueller Trainingseinheiten gelernt haben.

Arbeiten Sie mit einem Trainer zusammen, der in der Lage ist, in einer virtuellen Umgebung zu gestalten, zu implementieren und sicher zu debriefen.

Kunden kommen mit ihrer Erfahrung aus dem Präsenztraining zu uns. Sie wissen, was sie in einem eintägigen Seminar erreichen können und wollen diese Erfahrung in eine virtuelle Trainingsumgebung übertragen. Allerdings ist nicht alles direkt übertragbar. In einer persönlichen Sitzung beobachtet, reagiert und passt sich ein Trainer spontan an. Sie überwachen ständig, was funktioniert und was nicht, was die Leute verstehen und was nicht etc. In gewisser Weise „spürt“ der Trainer, wie das Training abläuft. Mit der virtuellen Bereitstellung haben Trainer weniger Möglichkeiten, dies zu tun.  Eine häufige Antwort für den Trainer ist, sich viel mehr auf den Inhalt zu konzentrieren als auf die Trainingsdynamik. Dies kann das Training in eine Vorlesung verwandeln.

Virtuelles Training erfordert Trainer mit neuen Fähigkeiten, Qualifikationen und Erfahrungen. Sie benötigen einen erfahrenen Trainer, der in der Lage ist, in einer virtuellen Umgebung zu gestalten, zu implementieren und sicher zu debriefen.

Zeit für Interaktionen schaffen

Wie bereits oben erwähnt, ist es in einem Präsenzseminar einfach und natürlich, dass Interaktionen stattfinden – entweder mit dem Trainer oder zwischen den Teilnehmern.  Wenn Sie ein Training virtuell durchführen, wird dies viel schwieriger. Gehen Sie nicht davon aus, dass die Interaktion leicht erfolgen wird. Für Gruppen ist es viel schwieriger, sich tatsächlich zu treffen und in einer virtuellen Umgebung ein Gefühl füreinander zu bekommen. Ein erfahrener und qualifizierter Trainer findet Abhilfe: Interaktionen werden geplant, Aktivitäten werden sorgfältig entworfen und mehr Zeit für Gruppen- und Paaraktivitäten aufgewendet.

Die Trainingsgruppen klein halten

Der Schwierigkeitsgrad der Aktivierung und Förderung von Interaktion bedeutet, dass kleinere Gruppen (nicht größere Gruppen) in einer virtuellen Umgebung ein Muss sind. Unsere Erfahrung ist, wenn Sie über den Wissenstransfer hinausgehen wollen, um Fähigkeiten aufzubauen und Verhaltensweisen zu ändern, ist eine Gruppe von 6 Personen ideal. Je mehr Teilnehmer Sie über 6 hinaus haben, desto schwieriger wird die Interaktion, und desto wahrscheinlicher ist es, dass jemand mental abschaltet und/oder mit Multi-Tasking beginnt – und desto mehr Zeit benötigt der Trainer, um die technische Umgebung zu überwachen und zu kontrollieren und sich nicht auf die Personen selbst zu konzentrieren.

Für Gruppen über 8 Personen sollten Sie einen fähigen und erfahrenen „Producer“ beauftragen. Ein Producer unterstützt den Trainer bei der Verwaltung der virtuellen Umgebung, der Überwachung von Interaktionen, der Einrichtung von Breakout-Räumen und der Aufrechterhaltung von Geschwindigkeit, Fluss und Interaktion usw.  Ein erfahrener technischer Producer kann es dem Trainer leicht ermöglichen, mit mehr als 12 Teilnehmern zu arbeiten.

Halten Sie mehrere Sitzungen von max. 2,5 Stunden statt einer langen Sitzung

Ein ganztägiges Präsenzseminar lässt sich nicht in ein ganztägiges virtuelles Seminar übersetzen. In einer virtuellen Umgebung können sich die Menschen nicht so lange konzentrieren. Unsere Erfahrung zeigt, dass 2 – 2 ½ Stunden die maximale Dauer für eine einzelne Sitzung ist. Das bedeutet, dass Sie über drei zweistündige virtuelle Sitzungen nachdenken sollten, die einem Tag Präsenztraining entsprechen. Sie können eine ähnliche Menge an Training in der gleichen Zeit abdecken, aber wenn Sie das Training virtuell durchführen, müssen Sie den Ansatz neu gestalten, aufteilen und aufschlüsseln.

Planen Sie sorgfältig, wenn Sie mit mehreren Zeitzonen arbeiten

Ein Vorteil des virtuellen Trainings ist, dass jeder überall teilnehmen kann. Wir empfehlen Ihnen, sich davon nicht mitreißen zu lassen. Es kann Sie Geld sparen, aber Sie verlieren die volle Wirksamkeit des Trainings. Nach unserer Erfahrung ist es eine große Herausforderung für die Teilnehmer und den Trainer, wenn einige um sechs Uhr morgens, einige während der Mittagspause und einige um sechs Uhr abends dabei sind. Die Achtung der Konzentrationsspanne und des Umfelds der Menschen wird sich am Ende auszahlen.

 


Für weitere Informationen

Wenn Sie neu in der virtuellen Vortragsweise sind, Ihr virtuelles Vortragen hochfahren möchten oder daran interessiert sind, Ihr virtuelles Training interaktiver und wertvoller zu gestalten, dann finden Sie einen erfahrenen Partner oder einen Berater. Wir könnten die Richtigen für Sie sein, wer weiß. Wenn Sie daran denken, mit einem virtuellen Training zu beginnen, dann Fragen Sie Angebot an. Seien Sie sich darüber im Klaren, was Sie erreichen wollen, und bitten Sie die Anbieter, Ihnen mitzuteilen, was Sie benötigen, damit es funktioniert.

3 Fragen, die Sie stellen sollten, wenn Sie sich in einer Konfliktsituation befinden.

Es ist Montagmorgen 11 Uhr und du bist auf halbem Weg durch dein wöchentliches Team-Meeting…. und du bist gefangen. Zwei deiner wichtigsten Teamleiter haben gerade begonnen, sich über die gleichen alten Probleme zu streiten. Immer und immer wieder. Du wirst gereizt! Was machst du jetzt? Was sind deine persönlichen Konflikteskalations- oder De-eskalationsmuster? Explodierst du? z.B. „Könnt ihr beide verdammt nochmal endlich die Klappe halten!!!!!!!!!„.  Das ist eine, wenn auch nicht sehr konstruktive Art, damit umzugehen. Würdest du Friedensstifter spielen, z.B. „Wir sind alle im selben Boot und sollten uns gegenseitig unterstützen, oder nicht?“ So attraktiv es auch klingt, dieser Ansatz wird den Konflikt tatsächlich eskalieren, indem er versucht, ihn zu verbergen. Oder schiebst du es einfach weg, z.B. „Kümmert Euch draußen darum, nachdem wir fertig sind, ich werde das hier drin nicht tolerieren„. Das ist auch keine „Lösung“, denn sie wird zurückkommen und dich wie einen Bumerang treffen… wahrscheinlich in deinen Rücken. Du bist Teil des Konflikts, ob es dir gefällt oder nicht, und das bedeutet, dass du Teil der Lösung sein musst. Hier sind 3 grundlegende Fragen, die du dir stellen musst…

DOWNLOAD THE CAN-DO TOOLBOX

Was ist eigentlich genau in diesem Moment los?

Wenn du dich in einer Konfliktsituation befindest, ist es wichtig, dich zu fragen, was tatsächlich passiert? Was ist das „Phänomen“? Die Suche nach dem Phänomen ist enorm wichtig und nicht immer leicht zu finden. Was genau passiert in diesem Moment?

  • Hat es mit mir zu tun, mit meinen Handlungen?
  • Hat das etwas mit den Haushaltsberatungen zu tun, die wir führen?
  • Hat es etwas mit alter Vendetta oder einem Machtkampf zwischen den beiden zu tun?

Das bringt uns zur zweiten Frage…

Wie fühlst du dich in diesem Moment?

Diese Frage klingt einfach genug, kann aber unerwartet schwer zu beantworten sein, wenn wir uns im Konflikt selbst befinden.  Arbeite daran, die Emotionen der Oberfläche zu überwinden und gehe tiefer. Wie fühlst du dich WIRKLICH über das, was passiert? Die Beantwortung dieser 2 Fragen allein erhöht die Chancen, Teil der Lösung zu sein, erheblich. Sie werden dir helfen, den Konflikt konstruktiv zu lösen (die Situation zu de-eskalieren), indem sie dich zwingen, den reflektierenden Teil deines Gehirns (den präfrontalen Kortex) zu benutzen.

So sehr mein Ego auch gerne sagen würde, dass der reflektierende Gehirnteil immer dominant ist, ER IST ES NICHT. Für niemanden von uns. Es ist der neueste Teil des Gehirns, und der am wenigsten dominante. Normalerweise gibt es einen „Highway“ von Verbindungen zwischen den drei Gehirnteilen/Schichten, aber in dem Moment, in dem wir uns im Konflikt befinden, verengt sich dieser „Highway“ auf eine Einbahnspur, was unsere Konfliktbearbeitungsfähigkeiten ernsthaft beeinträchtigt.

Um nun auf unsere Situation zurückzukommen, die Besprechungssituation mit den Teamleitern: Du stehst jetzt da, und hast den primitiven Teil des Gehirns beruhigt und darüber reflektiert. Es ist an der Zeit, die dritte Frage zu stellen.

Was willst du tun?

Nehmen wir an, du weißt, dass es eigentlich darum geht, dass ein Teamleiter durch einen Mangel an Ressourcen frustriert ist. Er ist enttäuscht von der Situation (und nicht wütend, auch wenn es so aussehen mag). Denke daran, dass seine Wahrnehmung für ihn WIRKLICH ist. Er glaubt, dass die andere Abteilung über alle Ressourcen und die gesamte Anerkennung verfügt. Er hat eine Geschichte in seinem Kopf konstruiert und ist nun in Emotionen gefangen, die nicht unbedingt mit der Situation zusammenhängen.

OK, also was willst du dagegen tun? Das ist die dritte Frage. Die dritte Option. Eine Möglichkeit, zu entscheiden, was zu tun ist, wäre, sich auf die „Wahl der Konfliktstrategie“ zu konzentrieren (problem-solving, forcing, avoiding, accommodation). Eine andere könnte die Frage sein, welche „Verhandlungsstrategie“ du verwenden wirst?

Die 3 Fragen helfen dir und deinem Gehirn, sein volles Potenzial auszuschöpfen

Durch die Lösung der ersten beiden Fragen wird die Wahl für die dritte Frage, die rationalere sein, egal was du tun willst. Was auch immer du tust, denk daran, dass, wenn du diese beiden Individuen erreichen willst, mit welcher Botschaft auch immer, du den Teilen ihres Gehirns helfen musst, wieder zu kommunizieren (ihren „Highway“ wieder zu öffnen). Du musst in kurzen Sätzen sprechen und ihnen helfen zu sehen, was tatsächlich vor sich geht (F1) und wie sie sich im Moment wirklich fühlen (F2). Wie auch immer du dich der Lösung des Konflikts näherst, du kannst jetzt klarer sehen und aktiv entscheiden, hast den Konflikt schnell analysiert und die Kontrolle über deinen Geist bewahrt.

Vielleicht siehst du jetzt einen Bedarf für die laufende Diskussion. Vielleicht ist es mit der Unternehmensstrategie verbunden und dieser Konflikt daher wertvoll. Du könntest dich dafür entscheiden, dem Mitarbeiter die Anerkennung zu geben, nach der er sich sehnt („Ich bin mir bewusst, dass deine Abteilung sehr unter Druck stand. Ich bin mir auch bewusst, dass dies nichts mit der anderen Abteilung zu tun hat. Lass‘ uns eine separate Besprechung abhalten und darüber reden“).

AUFRICHTIG angegangen, hast du das Problem für den Moment gelöst. Du musst, wie versprochen, darauf zurückkommen und es ansprechen, aber zumindest können dich die Manager jetzt hören und an dem bevorstehenden Meeting teilnehmen.

Für weitere Informationen

Target Training bietet seit 15 Jahren eine Reihe von konfliktbezogenen Trainingslösungen an. Dazu gehören „Umgang mit kritischen Konfliktsituationen“ und „Konfliktmanagement in virtuellen Teams„. Wir bieten auch Einzel- und Teamcoaching-Lösungen an.

 


Über den Autor

Preben ist ein professioneller Mediator und Konfliktmanager. Sein Schwerpunkt liegt auf menschlichen Interaktionen, wie Management und Führung, interkulturelle Beziehungen und zwischenmenschliche Kommunikation. Bis vor kurzem war er ein willkommener Teil von Target Training und arbeitet heute für eine große europäische Institution. In seinem Privatleben liebt er Karate, Wandern und Klettern.

Konflikte lösen – die 3 Fragen in die Praxis umsetzen

Konflikt ist ein unvermeidlicher Teil jeder Beziehung. In einem kürzlich veröffentlichten Beitrag habe ich 3 Fragen geteilt, die man sich in einer Konfliktsituation stellen sollte. Ich weiß, dass das Leben nicht so linear ist wie ein Blogbeitrag und „3 Fragen“ allzu einfach erscheinen können.  Also, möchte ich Ihnen anhand eines persönlichen Beispiels in diesem Beitrag mitteilen, wie die Fragen in der realen Welt aussehen.

The big (free) eBook of negotiations language

Der Hintergrund & die Situation

Ich arbeite als Konfliktmediator für eine große EU-Institution und wurde kürzlich gebeten, in ein afrikanisches Land zu reisen. Ich wurde gebeten, zwischen einer Regierungsstelle auf der einen Seite und einer großen Gruppe von Einzelpersonen aus einer sehr armen Gemeinschaft auf der anderen Seite zu vermitteln. Ich war den ganzen Weg aus Luxemburg gereist und als ich ankam, habe ich ein Treffen mit allen Einzelpersonen dieser lokalen Gemeinschaft vereinbart. Ich wollte herausfinden, was vor sich ging, worum es bei dem Konflikt ging und viel mehr über die Geschichte hinter diesem Konflikt, die Interessen der Menschen usw. erfahren. Mit anderen Worten, ich wollte das F1 herausfinden. Was war eigentlich genau in diesem Moment los?

Es war Dienstagmorgen, ich war weit gereist und ziemlich müde.  Ich war es nicht gerade gewohnt, in einem solchen Gebiet zu leben oder gar zu sein – Slums wäre das Wort, das viele Menschen aus dem Westen benutzen würden – Polizei- und Armeekontrollpunkte mit Maschinengewehren, die in meine Richtung zeigen, in einem heißen Taxi sitzen und Bestechungsgelder aushändigen. Zusammen machten mich all diese Dinge nervös. Ich war definitiv auf unbekanntem Terrain und etwas angespannt…. und es war NIEMAND beim Meeting. Nun gut, es waren zwei Leute da, aber ich hatte hundert plus erwartet! Meine Gedanken waren: „Kommt schon, Ihr wart diejenigen, die diesen GROSSEN Konflikt von mir und meiner Organisation gelöst haben wolltet. Ihr sagtet, Ihr wünscht Euch eine Lösung, also sind wir gekommen, und jetzt seid Ihr nicht einmal hier! Wenn diese Lethargie typisch für diese Gemeinschaft ist, konnte ich ja kaum überrascht sein von dem destruktiven Verhalten der lokalen Behörden!

Ich fing an, mich zu ärgern, wütend zu werden, und ich konnte spüren, wie der Frust wuchs. Also atmete ich bewusst tief durch, versuchte, meinen Kopf frei zu bekommen und stellte mir zwei Fragen – F1 Was war los? und F2 Wie fühlte ich mich?

Sich selbst zu verstehen ist die Grundlage für die Lösung von Konflikten

Das erste, was mir in den Sinn kam, war: „Wenn ich nach Europa zurückkehre und wir überhaupt keine Fortschritte gemacht haben, um zu versuchen, diesen Konflikt zu lösen, wird mein Ruf und möglicherweise meine Karriere in Gefahr sein.“  Mit anderen Worten, ich erlebte Angst. Die zweite Sache, die mir durch den Kopf ging, ist: „Ich bin ziemlich wütend. Ich habe Zeit damit verbracht, hierher zu kommen, und Ihr seid nicht einmal hier! Was für ein Respekt oder Mangel an Respekt ist das?

Ich dachte, dass ich die erste und zweite Frage beantwortet hatte, wusste aber, dass etwas fehlte. Was habe ich wirklich davon gehalten? Nun, in diesem Moment hatte ich Angst um meine persönliche Karriere UND ich dachte, ich wäre wütend, weil ich das Gefühl hatte, dass die Einheimischen mich und meine Bemühungen nicht respektierten. Ich stellte mir die Frage noch einmal und versuchte,  genauer in mich hinein zuhören. Wütend war, wie ich mich verhielt, aber als ich die Dinge mehr durchdachte, wurde mir klar, dass die eigentliche Emotion für mich in dieser Situation eher wie eine Enttäuschung war. Ich wollte helfen und hatte mehr erwartet.

ABER, haben mir die obigen Überlegungen und Emotionen wirklich ein Bild davon vermittelt, worum es in diesem kleinen „Meeting-Konflikt“ ging? Nein, hat es nicht!

Die Bedeutung von Kultur in Konflikten

Ich schaute mir noch einmal an, was vor sich ging…. Eine Sitzung wurde einberufen. Die Leute kamen zu spät, aber andererseits ist es Afrika! Sie liefen nach „afrikanischer Zeit“ und ich nach „europäischer Zeit“.  Es war also weder persönlich noch ein Zeichen oder eine Ablehnung der Mediation. Wir kamen nur aus zwei verschiedenen Kulturen, mit unterschiedlichen Erwartungen an Zeit und Pünktlichkeit. Was das Risiko meiner Karriere betrifft: Nun, das ist ein systemisches Risiko. Es ist immer da, aber hat nichts mit dem vorliegenden Pünktlichkeitskonflikt zu tun. Ich hatte 2 von 100 Leuten für ein Meeting da. Das war ein Konflikt, denn zwei von 100 waren nicht in der Lage, mir ein brauchbares und vollständiges Bild des Konflikts zu vermitteln, noch konnten sie als Vertreter der lokalen Gemeinschaft angesehen werden, die für die Wirksamkeit der Mediation erforderlich war. Dieser Konflikt war jedoch keineswegs mit einem systemischen Risiko zu Hause verbunden. Was das mögliche Verhalten der lokalen Behörden betrifft, so stand das auch nicht im Zusammenhang mit dem Konflikt, der gerade jetzt stattfindet. Das war die Norm.

Mein Gehirn begann wieder zu funktionieren …

Managen Sie Ihre 3 Gehirne, damit sie zusammenarbeiten

Einfach ausgedrückt, ist unser Gehirn in drei Teile geteilt, den Neokortex (der reflektierende und analytische Teil und auch der neueste Teil), das Limbische System (der emotionale Teil, der durch unsere Emotionen erfahren wird) und den Hirnstamm (manchmal auch der Reptilienteil genannt, der den Kampf- oder Fluchtinstinkt steuert). Indem ich mich zwinge, mir die beiden Fragen zu stellen und sie mir erneut zu stellen (Was geht eigentlich vor sich, genau in diesem Moment?, und wie fühlst du dich in diesem Moment?), hatte ich mich selbst „de-eskaliert“. Ich hatte meinem sich abmühenden Gehirn geholfen, als Ganzes zu arbeiten und nicht in den unteren Gehirnteilen stecken zu bleiben. Ich konnte mich beruhigen, damit ich mich effektiv in das Meeting einbringen konnte… als es endlich begann.

Übrigens sind die Leute tatsächlich aufgetaucht. Nach eineinhalb Stunden!

Nun stellte sich noch die letzte Frage… Wie sollte ich den Konflikt lösen?

Für weitere Informationen

Target Training bietet seit 15 Jahren eine Reihe von konfliktbezogenen Trainingslösungen an. Dazu gehören „Umgang mit kritischen Konfliktsituationen“ und „Konfliktmanagement in virtuellen Teams„. Wir bieten auch Einzel- und Teamcoaching-Lösungen an.


Über den Autor

Preben ist ein professioneller Mediator und Konfliktmanager. Sein Schwerpunkt liegt auf menschlichen Interaktionen, wie Management und Führung, interkulturelle Beziehungen und zwischenmenschliche Kommunikation. Bis vor kurzem war er ein willkommener Teil von Target Training und arbeitet heute für eine große europäische Institution. In seinem Privatleben liebt er Karate, Wandern und Klettern.

Virtuelle Meetings: Dos and Don’ts

Stellen Sie sicher, dass Ihre virtuellen Meetings produktiv sind

Virtuelle Meetings können manchmal knifflig sein. Sind sie eher wie ein Telefonat oder ein persönliches Treffen? Nun, sie sind eine Kombination aus beidem und sollten unterschiedlich behandelt werden. Hier sind einige schnelle und einfache „Dos and Don’ts“ für virtuelle Meetings.

New Call-to-action

Virtuelle Meetings: “Dos”

  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass alle Beteiligten, die für die Erreichung der Ziele von wesentlicher Bedeutung sind, anwesend sind – ansonsten vereinbaren Sie einen neuen Termin.
  • Seien Sie flexibel mit der Besprechungszeit damit Mitarbeiter in anderen Zeitzonen ebenfalls teilnehmen können.
  • Erstellen Sie eine Agenda, die die Ziele des Meetings beschreibt.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass die Besprechungspunkte/Prioritäten/Zeiten mit den Besprechungszielen übereinstimmen.
  • Sagen Sie ein regelmäßig stattfindendes Meeting ab, wenn Sie der Meinung sind, dass die Zeit besser anderweitig genutzt werden könnte.
  • Senden Sie mindestens drei Tage vor dem Meeting eine Erinnerung mit der Tagesordnung, den benötigten Materialien und Informationen über die zu verwendende Technologie.
  • Stellen Sie sicher, dass alle am Meeting teilnehmen und mitwirken
  • Eliminieren Sie Ablenkungen: Schalten Sie alle Smartphones aus und vermeiden Sie E-Mails und Instant Messaging während des Meetings.
  • Machen Sie Nebengespräche über ein Thema zur offiziellen Funktion des Treffens.
  • Entscheidungen und weitere Schritte dokumentieren

Virtuelle Meetings “Don’ts”

  • Halten Sie keine Besprechung ab, wenn Sie die Frage „Was ist der Zweck und das erwartete Ergebnis?“ nicht eindeutig beantworten können.
  • Treffen nicht zur „Gewohnheit“ werden lassen
  • Versuchen Sie nicht, mehr als fünf spezifische Punkte pro Sitzung abzudecken.
  • Lassen Sie weder Nebensächlichkeiten, „Experten“ oder Muttersprachler das Meeting dominieren.
  • Halten Sie keine Sitzung, wenn die für die Ziele der Sitzung wesentlichen Interessengruppen nicht teilnehmen können.
  • Nehmen Sie nicht an, dass die Teammitglieder sich über ihre Rolle und die Ziele des Meetings im Klaren sind.
  • Halten Sie keine kontinuierlichen „Marathon“-Sitzungen ohne Brainstorming oder Pausen in kleinen Gruppen
  • Behandeln Sie kritische Themen nicht zu Beginn des Meetings
  • Lassen Sie die Besprechung nicht aus dem Ruder laufen, indem Sie die Details einer Aktion besprechen, die für die Ziele der Besprechung nicht relevant sind.
  • Fangen Sie nicht später an

Mehr Tipps zu virtuellen Teams?

Diese Dos and Don’ts sind nur eine kleine Auswahl der Tipps in unserem neuesten Ebook: The ultimate book of Virtual Teams checklists. Stellen Sie sicher, dass Sie eine Kopie herunterladen, wenn Sie daran interessiert sind, die Wirkung Ihres virtuellen Teams zu maximieren. Viel Spaß beim Lesen und…. lassen Sie uns wissen, was für Ihr virtuelles Team funktioniert!!

Elvis, Statistiken und virtuelle Teams

Zum Zeitpunkt von Elvis‘ Tod gab es schätzungsweise 170 Elvis-Imitatoren in der Welt. Heute gibt es mindestens 85.000 Elvis auf der ganzen Welt. Bei dieser Wachstumsrate wird „statistisch gesehen“ jeder Dritte der Weltbevölkerung bis 2019 ein Elvis-Imitator sein.

Ich teile dies aus zwei Gründen. Erstens bin ich immer misstrauisch, wie man mit Hilfe von Statistiken eine Aussage machen kann – in diesem Fall eine absurde, wenn auch humorvolle. Zweitens können uns Statistiken helfen zu verstehen, was um uns herum geschieht. Es gibt viel mehr Elvis-Imitatoren auf der Welt als früher, und die Zahl steigt weiter an.

Virtuelle Teamstatistiken

““Was hat das mit virtuellen Teams zu tun?“, höre ich Sie sagen. Verbringen Sie 10 Minuten im Internet, und Sie können zahlreiche Statistiken über virtuelle Teams finden. Hier ist eine Auswahl…

  • 66% der multinationalen Unternehmen nutzen in großem Umfang virtuelle Teams, d.h. Projektteams, Managementteams, Serviceteams
  • 7 von 10 Managern glauben, dass sich virtuelle Teams in Zukunft immer mehr durchsetzen werden.
  • Zwischen 49% und 52% sind der Meinung, dass Zeitunterschiede den Erfolg des Teams beeinflussen – wobei die Standardlösung darin besteht, dass die Mitarbeiter viel länger arbeiten, um ihre Verfügbarkeit für Teambesprechungen sicherzustellen.
  • 15%-28% der Teammitglieder sind der Meinung, dass ein Mangel an Bewusstsein über die Arbeitsbelastung anderer Teammitglieder ein wiederkehrendes Problem ist. Virtuelle Teamleiter empfinden das Problem als größer.
  • Irgendwo zwischen 51% – 79% der virtuellen Teammitglieder glauben, dass der Mangel an persönlichen Beziehungen innerhalb des Teams Probleme verursacht
  • Ineffektive Führungsstile wirken sich negativ auf die Leistung eines virtuellen Teams aus (25 % bis 71 %).
  • 55% bis 73% der virtuellen Teamleiter glauben, dass die Entscheidungsfindung zu langsam ist.
  • 71% der Teams sind der Meinung, dass es an aktiver Teilnahme unter den Teammitgliedern mangelt.
  • Zwischen 10% und 47% der internationalen virtuellen Teams sind der Meinung, dass unzureichende Englischkenntnisse die Ergebnisse des Teams negativ beeinflussen.
  • Unterschiede in den kulturellen Normen stellen auch Herausforderungen an die Kommunikation, Entscheidungsfindung und den Aufbau von Beziehungen innerhalb des virtuellen Teams dar (26 % -49 %).
  • 81% sind der Meinung, dass schlechte Kommunikation und unangemessener Informationsaustausch (zu viel oder zu wenig) zwischen den Teammitgliedern den Erfolg des Teams beeinflussen.
  • Nicht zu wissen, wie man die vorhandene Technologie effektiv nutzt, ist ein Problem für mindestens 1 von 5 virtuellen Teams.
  • Nur 16% der Teams haben ein Training zur Arbeit in virtuellen Teams absolviert.

Was hat das zu bedeuten?

Zurück zu den beiden oben genannten Gründen – ja, wir verwenden Statistiken, um einen Punkt über virtuelle Teams zu machen. Wir sind ein Ausbildungsbetrieb, und ja, wir möchten, dass Sie in das Training investieren. Die obigen Statistiken helfen uns jedoch zu sehen, was passiert. So wie es heute weit mehr Elvis-Imitatoren gibt als 1977, ist es klar, dass virtuelle Teams da sind, um zu bleiben, dass die Herausforderungen bekannt sind und dass wir anfangen müssen, diese Barrieren anzugehen und zu überwinden, wenn wir wirklich effektiv arbeiten wollen.

Natürlich kann kein Trainingsprogramm das Problem des zeitzonenübergreifenden Arbeitens lösen, aber praktisches Training spielt bei vielen anderen Herausforderungen, mit denen virtuelle Teams konfrontiert sind, eine Rolle. Ein aufgabenspezifisches Business-Englisch-Training kann die durch Sprachbarrieren verursachten Grundprobleme verringern, und wenn Sie ein interkulturelles Element in Ihr Training integrieren, können Sie das Bewusstsein für die Auswirkungen der Kultur auf Geschäftsbeziehungen und Kommunikation schärfen. Soft Skills Training kann virtuelle Teamleiter viel entspannter und effektiver machen, wenn sie Teams führen. Dies wiederum wird Herausforderungen wie langsame Entscheidungsfindung, Umgang mit Konflikten und aktive Teambeteiligung ansprechen. Und was die Technologie betrifft: sie ist nicht so anspruchsvoll. Es geht vielmehr darum, Ihre Werkzeuge effektiv einzusetzen und Ihre Kommunikation und Teamdynamik entsprechend anzupassen.

Eine Vorab-Investition in Trainingseinheiten kann und wird Ihren virtuellen Teams langfristig greifbare Vorteile bringen. Aber jetzt genug davon: Strassanzug und Perücke anziehen und los singen.

 

Free downloads

THE ULTIMATE BOOK OF VIRTUAL TEAMS CHECKLISTSVTchecklists

CHECKLIST – ARE YOU AN EFFECTIVE VIRTUAL TEAM MEMBER?

Buchbesprechung: 5 tolle Bücher zur Leistungssteigerung Ihrer virtuellen Teams

Wie wir von vielen unserer Teilnehmer in unseren virtuellen Teamseminaren gehört haben, sind die Herausforderungen von virtuellen Teams ähnlich wie die von Face-to-Face-Teams, nur  nochmal vergrößert. Hinzu kommen neue Herausforderungen, wie z.B. die Auswirkungen des fehlenden sozialen Kontakts, der die Teams zusammenhält, oder die Anpassung der richtigen Technologie an die richtige Aufgabe. Die unten aufgeführten Quellen helfen uns weiterhin, uns auf praktische Lösungen für die realen Probleme und Möglichkeiten virtueller Teams zu konzentrieren. Wir hoffen, dass sie Ihnen auch in einer virtuellen Umgebung zum Erfolg verhelfen.

VTchecklists

Free eBook download

Virtual Team Success

von Darleen Derosa & Richard Lepsinger

Dieses forschungsbasierte Buch ist eine Zusammenstellung von praktischen Ansätzen für virtuelles Teaming. Das Buch enthält eine Reihe hilfreicher Checklisten und Best Practices, die als Leitfaden für virtuelle Teamleiter und Teilnehmer dienen können. Der Verhaltensfokus von Virtual Team Success wird Ihnen helfen, Probleme zu überwinden, bevor sie auftreten, und zwar mit einer sachlichen Beratung, die auf echtem Erfolg basiert. Wenn Sie die Investition von Zeit, Energie und Ressourcen zur Verbesserung Ihrer virtuellen Teams rechtfertigen müssen, hilft Ihnen dieses Buch dabei. Die Prozesse zur Lösung gemeinsamer Probleme in virtuellen Teams sind ein Highlight.

Mastering Virtual Teams: Strategies Tools and Techniques that Succeed

von Deborah Duarte & Nancy Snyder

Die Autoren von Mastering Virtual Teams haben Best Practices, Tools und Techniken aus der Teamtheorie und dem Informations- und Wissensmanagement auf die Herausforderungen virtueller Teams angewandt. Sie haben die Informationen in drei leicht verständliche Bereiche gegliedert: Virtuelle Teams verstehen, erstellen und beherrschen. Ihre große praktische Erfahrung als Professoren, Berater und Wirtschaftsführer prägen den „how to“-Ansatz des Buches. Das Buch bietet ein Toolkit für Teilnehmer, Führungskräfte und Manager virtueller Teams. Praktische Werkzeuge, Übungen, Einsichten und Beispiele aus der Praxis helfen Ihnen, die Dynamik der virtuellen Teambeteiligung mit Richtlinien, Strategien und Best Practices für interkulturelles und funktionsübergreifendes Arbeiten zu meistern. Statt einfach nur „Vertrauen aufbauen“ zu sagen, geben uns die Autoren beispielsweise drei allgemeine Richtlinien für den Aufbau von Vertrauen in einer virtuellen Umgebung an. Kein Wunder, dass diese Faktoren auch in zusammengesetzten Teams funktionieren. Sie haben eine CD-Rom mit der dritten Ausgabe beigefügt – eine einfache Möglichkeit, die Checklisten und hilfreichen Dokumente aus dem Buch auszudrucken.

Where in the World is My Team: Making a Success of Your Virtual Global Workplace

von Terrence Brake

Where in the World is My Team: Making a Success of Your Virtual Global Workplace folgt den Heldentaten von Will Williams, der seinen Weg in einen virtuellen Arbeitsplatz und das Leben eines jungen Berufstätigen in London geht. Als Erzählung, die die Best Practices virtueller Organisationen und Teams verwebt, hilft das Buch dem Leser, Schritt für Schritte, Seite für Seite mitzugehen und Where in the World is My Team: Making a Success of Your Virtual Global Workplace nicht nur als Ressourcendokument zu verwenden. Das Buch ist weit mehr als nur ein unterhaltsamer Blick auf das digitale Leben. Der sehr detaillierte Anhang des Buches bietet recherchierte Unterstützung für die in der Geschichte hervorgehobenen virtuellen Strukturen und Werkzeuge. Die 6 C’s der globalen Zusammenarbeit von Brake bieten einen logischen Rahmen für die Bedürfnisse effektiver virtueller Teams.

Leading Virtual Teams

Harvard Business School Publishing

Leading Virtual Teams ist eine schnelle und einfache Anleitung für diejenigen, die nicht überzeugt werden müssen, ihre virtuellen Teams zu verbessern, sonder lediglich Tipps dafür brauchen. Das Buch behandelt die Grundlagen für diejenigen, die ihre ersten Erfahrungen mit führenden virtuellen Teams machen. Es gibt Hinweise auf verwandte Harvard Business Publikationen, eine Erwähnung des Harvard Erweiterungskurses zum Thema Managing Virtual Teams, der virtuell unterrichtet wird, und einen kurzen Test als Check-on-Learning.

The Big Book of Virtual Team Building Games

von Mary Scannell & Michael Abrams

The Big Book of Virtual Team Building Games füllt einen aktuellen Entwicklungsbedarf für viele virtuelle Teams mit Spielen, die den Aufbau von Beziehungen, die Lösung von Problemen und Teamfähigkeiten fördern. Die Spiele sind so konzipiert, dass sie mit verschiedenen virtuellen Teamplattformen gespielt werden können und sind geschickt nach Tuckmans Stadien der Teamentwicklung – forming, storming, norming, performing, sowie dem zusätzlichen Stadium transforming – angeordnet. Jedes Spiel wird ausführlich mit der ungefähren Zeit für die Fertigstellung beschrieben. Beachten Sie, dass Teams mit Mitgliedern, die eine Nicht-Muttersprache verwenden, etwas länger dauern können, als vorhergesagt.

 

Warum, statistisch gesehen, Ihre E-Mails nicht so klar sind, wie Sie glauben.

Zum Zeitpunkt der Erstellung dieses Blogs werden schätzungsweise 269 Milliarden Mails pro Tag verschickt. Sobald wir alle Spam-Mails (sagen wir 50%) entfernt haben, ist das immer noch eine Menge Kommunikation. Doch wie effektiv ist E-Mail als Kommunikationsmittel wirklich? Einfach ausgedrückt – es kommt darauf an. Wenn eine Mail gut geschrieben ist, zum Beispiel mit dem SUGAR-Ansatz, kann E-Mail ein effektiver Weg sein, um Informationen zu kommunizieren und Ideen auszutauschen. Allerdings, wo E-Mail beginnt zu straucheln ist, wenn sie Emotionen enthält oder vermittelt. Und wir sprechen hier nicht über GROSSE EMOTIONEN – die meisten von uns wissen, dass es keine gute Idee ist, E-Mails zu verschicken, wenn sie müde, verärgert, wütend usw. sind. E-Mail-Kommunikation hat allerdings auch Probleme, wenn wir versuchen, viel subtilere Emotionen zu vermitteln – Ironie, Sarkasmus, Zufriedenheit etc.

Writing emails that people read: Free eBook download

Warum haben wir Probleme damit, Emotionen per E-Mail zu kommunizieren?

In unseren Gesprächen vermitteln wir Emotionen sowohl durch Worte als auch durch paralinguistische Hinweise (Körpersprache, Gesichtsbewegungen, Ausdrücke, Gesten, Ton, Intonation usw.). In der Tat wird es sogar komplizierter, da manchmal das Fehlen eines erwarteten paralinguistischen Stichwortes die Emotion oder einen gemeinsamen Kontext vermittelt, zum Beispiel beim Ausdrücken von Ironie oder Sarkasmus.

Wenn es um E-Mail geht, versuchen wir, Emotionen durch Wortwahl, Satzstrukturen und – ob man sie nun mag oder nicht – Visuals wie Emojis zu vermitteln (ja, sie sind mittlerweile auch im Geschäftsleben üblich).  Wissenschaftliche Untersuchungen zeigen jedoch, dass wir unsere Fähigkeiten beim Schreiben von E-Mails immer wieder überschätzen.

 

Warum das Schreiben einer E-Mail anders ist

Schriftliche Kommunikation ist nicht neu – aber die Allgegenwart und Verbreitung von E-Mail ist es!  Das Schreiben und Briefe verschicken bedeutete, dass wir in größerem Maße planten und überlegten, was wir schrieben und wie wir es schrieben. Niemand hat einen 3-zeiligen Brief geschrieben.  Heutzutage bedeutet die Geschwindigkeit und Bequemlichkeit von E-Mails, dass wir zu oft nur tippen und senden. Dies bringt eine ganze Reihe neuer Verhaltensweisen mit sich, und weil es so sehr Teil der modernen Kommunikation ist, nehmen wir uns keine Zeit, um zu beurteilen, wie wir die E-Mail verwenden oder unsere Schreibfähigkeiten zu schärfen.

Forschung zeigt: unsere Kommunikation per E-Mail ist nicht so gut, wie wir denken.

Es gibt viel Forschung von Sozialpsychologen darüber, wie wir per E-Mail kommunizieren. Eine interessante Studie zeigt, dass die Grenzen von E-Mail oft unterschätzt werden, wenn es darum geht, eine beabsichtigte Emotion zu kommunizieren – und dass wir beim Schreiben einer E-Mail immer wieder überschätzen, wie gut unser Leser verstehen, was wir sagen.

Veröffentlicht im Journal of Personality and Social Psychology, führten Kruger, Epley, Parker und Zhi-Wen Ng eine Reihe von Studien durch, in denen sie verglichen, wie gut ein E-Mail-Autor seine E-Mails gegenüber dem Leser bewertet hat.

  • In einer Studie erwarteten 97% der Autoren, dass die ernsten und halbsarkastischen Sätze in ihrer E-Mail korrekt entschlüsselt werden. Die Leser haben nur 84% erfolgreich entschlüsselt.
  • Eine andere Studie verglich das übersteigerte Selbstvertrauen bei der sprachlichen Kommunikation mit dem übersteigerten Selbstvertrauen bei der Kommunikation per E-Mail. Bei der Kommunikation mit der Stimme glaubten 77,9%, dass ihr Ton verstanden werden würde – während es in Wirklichkeit 73,1% waren. Eine spürbare Lücke ABER deutlich besser als die E-Mail-Ergebnisse, wo 78% glauben, dass ihr Ton verstanden würde, während es eigentlich nur 56% waren!
  • Aber es ist anders, wenn Sie einem Kollegen schreiben, der Sie gut kennt, oder? Möglicherweise nicht – eine dritte Studie betrachtete übersteigertes Selbstvertrauen, wenn sie mit Fremden oder mit Freunden kommunizierten. Überraschenderweise deuteten die Ergebnisse darauf hin, dass Vertrautheit nicht in Kommunikationsgenauigkeit übersetzt werden kann.
  • Und schließlich hat eine weitere Studie gezeigt, dass E-Mail-Autoren in ihrer Fähigkeit, in einer E-Mail lustig zu sein, sich stets selbst überschätzt haben!

Warum sind wir so überzeugt, dass unsere E-Mails leicht zu entschlüsseln sind?

Es ist einfach, den Lesern die Schuld zu geben. Vielleicht haben sie die Mail zu schnell gelesen, oder sie haben sie am Handy überflogen, als sie zu ihrem nächsten Meeting gingen. Vielleicht sind ihre Sprachkenntnisse nicht stark genug und sie müssen ihr Geschäftsenglisch verbessern. Oder – wagen wir es zu sagen – vielleicht sind sie einfach zu „blöd“, um unsere gut geschriebenen E-Mails zu verstehen!

Tatsächlich liegt es oft daran, dass wir egozentrisch sind. Studien wie Elizabeth Newtons „Tapping-Studie“ – in der die Teilnehmer gebeten wurden, den Rhythmus eines bekannten Liedes, das sie hörten, zu klopfen  und dann abzuschätzen, ob ein anderer Zuhörer das Lied anhand ihres (überaus geschickten) Klopfens erraten würde (50% vs. 3%) – zeigen, wie leicht wir uns selbst davon überzeugen können, dass unsere Realität offensichtlich ist. Die Studien beleuchten auch, wie schwierig es ist, sich die Perspektive eines anderen vorzustellen (z.B. „Ich meinte es ganz klar ironisch – wie konnten sie das nicht verstehen?!)

Was können Sie also tun, damit Ihre Leser Ihre E-Mails richtig interpretieren können?

Hier sind drei Dinge, die Sie sich für die Zukunft merken können:

  • Bevor Sie auf Senden klicken, lesen Sie Ihre E-Mail mit Ihrem „Mehrdeutigkeits-Radar“ erneut durch. Wenn etwas anders verstanden werden könnte, dann schreiben Sie es neu, erklären Sie es – oder löschen Sie es einfach.
  • Wenn die Mail eine emotionale Komponente hat, lassen Sie sie dreißig Minuten lang in Ruhe und lesen Sie sie dann erneut.
  • Wenn etwas ein Witz ist, benutzen Sie Emojis.

Und schließlich, wenn Sie nicht sicher sind, benutzen Sie das Telefon

 

Effektive E-Mail-Etikette für virtuelle Teams

E-Mail ist nach wie vor eines der häufigsten Kommunikationskanäle in virtuellen Teams – und das kann durchaus zu Spannungen führen.  Die proaktive Bewältigung potenzieller Probleme ist der Schlüssel zum erfolgreichen Start eines virtuellen Teams – deshalb diskutieren wir in unseren Präsenz- und Online-Seminaren mit virtuellen Teamleitern die Erwartungen.  Natürlich kommt dabei die Kommunikation ins Spiel und die Zeit, die für die Erstellung eines Kommunikationsplans aufgewendet wird, ist immer gut investiert. Wie Jochen, ein deutscher Projektleiter, sagte: „Es klingt so offensichtlich, dass wir nicht daran gedacht haben, es zu tun – und jetzt, wo wir es haben, kann ich schon sagen, dass wir einige echte Hindernisse gelöst haben“.

Erstellung eines Kommunikationsplans beim Start Ihres virtuellen Teams

Ein Kommunikationsplan beschreibt, welche Kommunikationsmittel Sie verwenden werden und wie Sie diese nutzen werden.  Zum Beispiel „wir benutzen Webex für Brainstorming und Problemlösung, wir benutzen Hipster zum Chatten und Teilen von Links und wir benutzen Email für….“

Bei der Erstellung des Plans geht es darum, Ansätze und Erwartungen zu diskutieren – und durch das Durchsprechen dieser Erwartungen können Sie verschiedene Einstellungen aufdecken und mit ihnen umgehen.  Ein Beispiel, auf das wir oft stoßen, wenn wir mit multikulturellen virtuellen Teams arbeiten, ist, dass ein Teammitglied erwartet, dass die Leute ein höfliches „Danke für die Nachricht“ zurückschreiben, ein anderes kann dies jedoch als Zeitverschwendung – und sogar als lästig! – empfinden. Und weil E-Mail immer noch so allgegenwärtig ist, haben wir gesehen, dass die meisten Frustrationen von der Art und Weise herrühren, wie Menschen E-Mails nutzen (oder nicht nutzen). Damit Sie mit Ihrer Planung beginnen können, teilen wir Ihnen hier eine Liste von E-Mail-Verpflichtungen mit, denen einer unserer Kunden zugestimmt hat (natürlich mit deren Erlaubnis).

E-Mail-Verpflichtungen eines Software-Entwicklungsteams, das virtuell in 3 Ländern arbeitet

  1. Wir werden unsere E-Mails mindestens alle 3 Stunden überprüfen.
  2. Wir checken keine E-Mails, wenn wir in Meetings sind.
  3. Wir benutzen das Telefon und hinterlassen eine Nachricht, wenn etwas wirklich zeitkritisch ist.
  4. Wir schreiben E-Mail-Betreffzeilen, die sofort erklären, worum es in der E-Mail geht.
  5. Wir werden Schlüsselwörter wie „Erledigen bis zum XX“ oder „zu Ihrer Information“ in den Titeln verwenden.
  6. Wir gehen davon aus, dass jemand, der in eine E-Mail kopiert wird (cc), nicht antworten muss.
  7. Wir werden es vermeiden, „Antwort an alle“ zu verwenden, wenn nicht jeder die Informationen unbedingt benötigt.
  8. Wir benutzen das Telefon, wenn 3 E-Mails zu einem Thema geschickt wurden.
  9. Wir akzeptieren, dass E-Mails, die von Handys gesendet werden, gelegentlich Tippfehler enthalten.
  10. Wir erwarten, dass größere E-Mails gut geschrieben sind.
  11. Wir verwenden keine BLOCKSCHRIFT (CAPITALS) und wir benutzen normalerweise keine Farben, es sei denn, etwas ist kritisch und wichtig.
  12. Wir verwenden fett, um dabei zu helfen, nach wichtigen Informationen zu scannen.
  13. Wir schenken den Personen im Zweifel immer das Vertrauen, wenn etwas auf zwei Arten verstanden werden kann.
  14. Wenn wir eine E-Mail in einem emotionalen Zustand schreiben, sind wir uns alle einig, dass wir sie speichern werden – und am nächsten Tag darauf zurückkommen. Und trotzdem wird ein Anruf von allen bevorzugt.
  15. Wenn wir zwischenmenschliche Probleme haben, verwenden wir keine E-Mails – wir benutzen das Telefon oder nutzen Skype für Unternehmen.
  16. Wir werden diese Liste jedes 4. Skype-Meeting überprüfen. Halten wir uns noch alle daran?

Die obige Liste ist klar und übersichtlich. Sie wurde in einer 30-minütigen Diskussion aufgebaut und sie funktioniert. Wir werben nicht dafür, dass Ihr sie wörtlich nehmt – aber warum nicht als Sprungbrett nutzen, um das Verhalten Ihres eigenen Teams zu diskutieren? Der Aufbau eines gemeinsamen Verständnisses im Vorfeld hilft Ihrem virtuellen Team, reibungslos und sicher zu kommunizieren.

Und wenn Sie mehr lesen wollen

Hier ist ein nützliches Dokument (auf Englisch) mit Tipps und Redewendungen für eine effektive Kommunikation zwischen verschiedene Kulturen.

Virtuelle Teams: Aufgaben vor dem Meeting

Was machen Sie vor Ihren virtuellen Teambesprechungen?

Die Vorbereitung auf ein Meeting ist wichtig, insbesondere für virtuelle Meetings via Telefonkonferenz oder Netmeetings. Es ist schwierig, in virtuellen Teams zu arbeiten, da man die anderen Teammitglieder nicht oft von Angesicht zu Angesicht sieht. Versuchen Sie also ein paar kleine Dinge vor Ihren Meetings anzupacken, um sich nicht weiter zu benachteiligen. Hier sind fünf einfache Dinge, die Sie vor Ihren virtuellen Teambesprechungen tun können, um sie produktiver zu machen.

5 Aufgaben vor dem virtuellen Meeting

1.  Teammitglieder identifizieren

Führen Sie die Entscheidungsträger, Fachexperten und Meinungsführer vor dem Treffen auf und ermitteln Sie ihr mögliches Interesse am Ausgang des Treffens.

Resultate:

  • Wissen, wen man wann ansprechen muss
  • Wissen, wer bestimmte technische Fragen beantworten kann
  • Informationen auf die Interessen der Entscheidungsträger fokussieren

2.  Grundregeln festlegen

Das Team entscheidet vor Beginn der Sitzung über ein akzeptables Meeting-Verhalten und hält sich gegenseitig für die Regeln verantwortlich; z.B. keine Unterbrechungen, Meinungsumfragen, immer eine Tagesordnung usw…

Resultate:

  • Förderung von Verhaltensweisen, die die Interaktion in der Gruppe verbessern.
  • Kein einziger „Vollstrecker“ notwendig
  • Verantwortlichkeit durch Erinnern

3.  Veröffentlichung einer Agenda (Ziele)

Die Veröffentlichung einer Agenda sollte ein „Muss“ sein, aber es passiert nicht immer oder nicht rechtzeitig, damit sich die Teilnehmer darauf vorbereiten können. Ein weiteres wichtiges Merkmal einer Agenda ist eine Absichtserklärung oder ein Ziel. Was wollen Sie mit dem Treffen erreichen? Wie sieht ein gutes Meeting aus? Die Beantwortung dieser Fragen wird Ihnen und Ihren Teilnehmern das Gefühl geben, etwas erreicht zu haben, wenn das Meeting vorbei ist.

Resultate:

  • Klare Richtung für das Treffen
  • Verbesserung der Vorbereitung der Teilnehmer
  • Art und Weise, wie die Teilnehmer sich auf das Thema konzentrieren können.
  • Das Gefühl verspüren, etwas erreicht zu haben, wenn es vorbei ist.

4.  Beziehungen aufbauen

Nehmen Sie sich vor dem Meeting Zeit, um die Teammitglieder persönlich kennenzulernen. Es ist wirklich wichtig, eine Beziehung und eine Verpflichtung zum virtuellen Team aufzubauen.

Resultate:

  • Lernen, woran andere, über die Arbeit des Treffens hinaus, interessiert sind
  • Mehr Informationen helfen dem besseren Verständnis
  • Helfen Sie, Metaphern und Geschichten zu entwerfen, um die wichtigsten Punkte zu illustrieren.
  • Erhöhung des Engagements für das virtuelle Team

5.  Beherrschen Sie die Technik, die Sie in Ihrem Meeting verwenden

Das Verstehen Ihrer technologischen Tools, was schief gehen kann und wie man es im Vorfeld des Meetings beheben kann, ist entscheidend. Seien Sie informiert darüber, welche Werkzeuge Ihren Teilnehmern zur Verfügung stehen und seien Sie bereit, den Teilnehmern bei Problemen zu helfen. Haben Sie immer einen Notfallplan in der Rückhand!

Resultate:

  • Technische Probleme vermeiden, bevor sie auftreten
  • Zeitersparnis bei der Lösung technischer Probleme während der Besprechung
  • Andere Teilnahmemöglichkeiten parat haben

Sie können sicherstellen, dass Ihre virtuellen Teambesprechungen reibungsloser ablaufen, indem Sie sich ein paar Minuten Zeit nehmen und die oben genannten fünf Dinge tun. Was haben Sie noch getan, das gut funktioniert hat? Lassen Sie es uns im Kommentarfeld unten wissen. Wenn Sie Ihre Teilnahme an virtuellen Teams insgesamt verbessern möchten, können Sie unser eBook mit Checklisten herunterladen und unser Seminar „Effektiv in virtuellen Teams arbeiten“ besuchen, indem Sie hier klicken.

Virtuell Feedback geben

Müssen Sie manchmal Ihr Feedback virtuell geben?

Geben Sie Ihren Lieferanten, Kunden und Mitarbeitern effektives Feedback – sowohl positiv als auch konstruktiv (negativ)? Gutes, rechtzeitiges, konstruktives und umsetzbares Feedback zu geben, ist etwas, wofür die meisten von uns viel Arbeit investieren müssen. Loben wir die richtigen Dinge? Wenn wir konstruktives Feedback geben, machen wir dann positive Vorschläge? Denken wir immer daran, das Thema anzusprechen, nicht die Person?VTchecklists

Feedback zu geben allein ist schon nicht einfach. Aber in einer immer virtueller werdenden Geschäftswelt gutes Feedback zu geben, kann eine echte Herausforderung sein. Wenn wir ein paar der Komplexitäten hinzufügen, die sich aus der virtuellen Interaktion ergeben, müssen wir eine noch schwierigere Aufgabe bewältigen. Einige dieser Herausforderungen sind Timing, Lesereaktionen, Spezifität und Ton. Wenn Sie virtuell, z.B. per E-Mail, Feedback geben, finden Sie hier einige Vorschläge und Tipps, die Ihnen helfen sollen, Ihre Arbeit besser zu machen.

Free eBook download

5 Tipps für das virtuelle Feedback

 1.  Stellen Sie sicher, dass das Timing stimmt – vor allem, wenn Ihr Feedback negativ ist. Denken Sie daran, wie ein Kind oder ein Haustier aufgezogen wird: Ihnen drei Tage später zu sagen, dass sie etwas falsch gemacht haben, ist kontraproduktiv!

2.  Sorgen Sie dafür, dass der Leser sofort versteht, worum es in der E-Mail geht:

  • Verwenden Sie eine Betreffzeile wie: „Feedback zu Ihrem Vorschlag“
  • Sagen Sie im ersten Satz, warum Sie eine E-Mail schreiben: „Ich schreibe Ihnen ein Feedback zu dem Vorschlag, den Sie mir am 4. Januar geschickt haben.“
  • Sagen Sie, welches Feedback enthalten ist: „Ich habe einige Rückmeldungen bezüglich der Preisgestaltung und des Zahlungsprozesses.“

3.  Brechen Sie Ihr Feedback auf. Wenn Sie gesagt haben, dass Sie eine Rückmeldung über den Preis und den Zahlungsprozess haben, sollten dies zwei völlig getrennte Absätze sein. Geben Sie ihnen Überschriften, wenn Sie wollen.

4.  Versuchen Sie konkret zu sein und begründen Sie Ihre Aussagen. Zum Beispiel:

  • „Wir mochten Ihren Vorschlag.“ Vor allem die zweite Seite, auf der Sie erwähnt haben, dass sich das Training auf unsere Unternehmenswerte konzentrieren würde. Das passt wirklich zu unserer Firmenphilosophie.“
  • „Leider können wir dem Punkt 3 in Abschnitt 2, der sich auf die Zahlungsmöglichkeiten bezieht, nicht zustimmen. Das steht nicht im Einklang mit unseren Compliance-Richtlinien.“

5.  Wenn Sie einen Vorschlag ablehnen, versuchen Sie, einen Gegenvorschlag zu machen. Zum Beispiel:

  • „Wir können Punkt 3 in Abschnitt 2 nicht zustimmen. Aber wir könnten uns einigen, wenn die Zahlungsfrist auf 60 Tage verlängert würde.“
  • „Mir gefällt es nicht, wie Sie den Bericht formatiert haben. Könnten Sie es nächstes Mal anhand des beigefügten Beispiels versuchen oder kommen Sie einfach zu mir, um meine Anforderungen genauer zu besprechen.“

Natürlich gibt es noch viele andere Dinge, die helfen können, das virtuelles Feedback effektiver zu gestalten. Bitte zögern Sie nicht, Ihre zusätzlichen Ideen in den Kommentaren unten einzutragen. Besuchen Sie auch unser Seminar „Effektiv in virtuellen Teams arbeiten„, um die Leistung Ihres virtuellen Teams zu verbessern.

 

 

What should I do with my hands during a presentation?

Whether you are presenting, telling a story or just talking, how you use hands (or don’t use them) is important. An analysis of TED talks found that the most popular TED talkers were using 465 hand gestures over 18 minutes – compared to the least popular using just 272. Other research shows that gestures – more than actions themselves – impact our understanding of meaning. Put simply, you need to unleash the power of gestures when you present.

New Call-to-action

Your hands give you away (4 things not to do)

We have all seen somebody standing in front of a large group of people, trying to remain calm and hide their nervousness, and their hands giving them away. We can see they’re nervous and uncomfortable. When presenting, don’t:

  1. Keep them in your pockets. This will usually come across to your audience as too casual and is often perceived by people at as you trying to hide your hands because of nervousness. Like it or not, it is best to keep your hands out in the open for the world to see.
  2. Keep them in behind you. Hiding them behind your back can this makes you look distant and reserved or even uninterested in the people you are talking to.
  3. Place them on your hips. A stance with both hands on the hips will, more than likely, seem aggressive or authoritarian and definitely will not win you any friends in your audience.
  4. Hold them together. You’ll look as if you are defending yourself and come across as unconfident and vulnerable. Crossing them can achieve the same result too.

4 Things to do with your hands when presenting

When you are presenting, the focus should be on you. Therefore, use everything in your arsenal to ensure your audience is interested and informed. By using your body to help emphasize your words, your presentation becomes more dynamic, and your audience is more likely to remember your message. Use your hands and arms; don’t leave them at your sides. Be aware of your body and how it can help you.

Open up

If you maintain a closed stance, the audience may suspect you are hiding something and won’t trust you. Remember not to cross your arms or to keep them too close together. You are not a T-Rex, so don’t keep your elbows glued to your ribs. Claim the space and show your hands.

Use broad gestures

These should fit with what you are saying and not be used randomly. You know what you are going to say, so now decide how you are going to say it. Your body is an extension of your voice, so it is important to use confident gestures while you are practicing your presentation. With practice, the gestures will become more natural and a part of your dynamic speaking style. Use your hands to emphasize, to contrast or even to convey emotions in your story.

Show an open palm

By keeping your hands open and showing the audience your open palms, you are showing you have nothing to hide. The audience are more likely to feel they can trust you, and that you are sincere in your message.

The Palm Sideways

This is like holding your hand as though you were going to shake another person’s hand. This gesture is used to impress upon the audience the point you are making. You are opening up your message and showing them what is inside. You can also use this to point … without using your finger.

Videos

And keep in mind that you don’t necessarily need to be flamboyant and bounce around. You just need to be authentically you! This Target Training video from James Culver on storytelling  is a great example of how smaller and gentle movements can be natural and still reinforce the message.

What to do with your hands when you’re presenting

Two excellent and short video displaying tips and tricks.

 

4 essential tips

From the 2014 Toastmasters International world champion of public speaking Dananjaya Hettiarachchi.  You may feel that Hettiarachchi is a little theatrical for a business scenario, but the 4 tips are directly transferable!

Body language

This video is longer (just under 14 minutes) but comprehensive.  It covers all areas of body language when presenting and is definitely worth watching.

If you’d like more tips on presenting in general…

We have 37 blog posts related to presenting on our blog. Two further eBooks on presentations are available to download in the sidebar: „Presentation Models“ and „Presenting with IMPACT.“ Or, one of our seminars on this topic might be just what you need:

 

Watch, listen and learn: 3 great TEDx talks on listening

Many of our communication skills seminars involve practical listening activities, and occasionally we get requests solely for listening skills. But it’s arguably wrong to see listening as one of many “communication skills” – listening is so much more fundamental than that. Listening builds trust, strengthens relationships, and resolves conflicts. It’s fundamental in everything we do. In a HBR article „the discipline of listening“, Ram Charan shared what many of us already know: Not every manager is a great listener. Charan’s own “knowledge of corporate leaders’ 360-degree feedback indicates that one out of four leaders has a listening deficit, “the effects of which can paralyze cross-unit collaboration, sink careers, and if it’s the CEO with the deficit, derail the company.” Good managers need to know how to listen – and great managers know how to listen well. And because we know you’re busy we’ve taken the time to find 3 TEDx talks for you listen to.

New Call-to-actionThe power of listening with William Ury

William Ury is the co-author of “Getting to Yes”, the bestselling negotiation book in the world. This is a great video exploring what genuine listening really is, why it’s so important and how to take our first steps to improving our listening.  He explains why he feels that listening is “the golden key to opening doors to human relationships” and why the skill of listening needs to be actively practiced every day. Ury uses stories of conversations with presidents and business leaders to show the simple power of listening: how it helps us understand the other person, how it helps us connect and build rapport and trust, and how it makes it more likely that you’ll be listened to too.

 

The Power of Deliberate Listening with Ronnie Polaneczky

Grabbing our attention with the shocking story of an angry reader, journalist Ronnie Polaneczky expands on why we need to consciously and actively practice our “listening muscle”. By practicing deliberate listening and putting aside our own judgements we can discover things we don’t know that we don’t know.  She moves beyond the obvious “techniques” (e.g. look them in the eye, nod your head and repeat back what you’ve heard) and challenges us to think about letting go of positions (e.g. “I want to be right”) and embracing learning – letting go of our need to judge. She closes with the personal impact listening has – it doesn’t just change the person being listened to – it changes the listener.

A Case for Active Listening with Jason Chare

You may find this talk far removed from a business environment, but active listening skills are essential for those managers wanting to build a coaching approach. Jason Chare, a professional counselor, shares his experiences with an audience of teachers.  The second half (around the ninth minute) begins to look at specific strategies and attitudes – especially the importance of unconditional positive regard and listening with empathy.  Check out this article on “Three ways leaders can listen with more empathy” too!

More listening resources for you …

And if you’d like to know more about how you can further develop your or your team’s listening skills then please don’t hesitate to contact us. We’d love to listen to you.

Making sure managers understand the importance of their role in developing our staff

This month’s Secret L&D manager is Australian, based in Germany and works for an American corporation which produces machine vision systems and software.  He has worked in training and development for over 18 years – as an L&D manager, an in-house trainer and as an external training provider.

New Call-to-actionWhat are your challenges as an L&D manager?

One of the things that’s burning at the moment is helping the managers I work with see the role they play in developing people.  This is not a question of lack of willingness on their side – just a lack of awareness of the role they can and should play. For example, most of the time if they know that Dieter needs to improve his presentation skills, they send him on one of the 2-day presentation courses we run. When Dieter gets back, they expect that they can tick a box and say, “Well, Dieter can present now.” This is a start, but it isn’t good enough. It is not enough for them to assume that the training department or the training provider is going to solve everything alone. I need to help them see their role in developing their staff’s skills.

How do you see the manager’s role in developing their staff?

If we look at the 70-20-10 model, just 10% of the change will come from the training itself. 20% is when Dieter is learning from his colleagues, sharing ideas and giving each other tips and feedback. BUT, the other 70% will come from just getting up there and doing it (best of course, if supplemented with feedback and guidance where required). If the manager wants somebody to get better at a skill, they need to make sure there is plenty of opportunity for that person to actually use that skill, give them support and guidance and let them use what they are learning. This is clearly in the manager’s hands.  I want our managers to be realistic in their expectations and see the role that they play in the developmental process. We work together.

How do you see your role in this?

I have a number of roles. I work to identify current and future training needs. I then organize practical training with training providers who are going to deliver what we need and challenge the participants to really improve.  I also need to help our managers understand their role in developing our staff and encourage them to see training as a collaborative effort between them, the employee, us in L&D, and the training providers.  And of course, the person getting the training needs to take some responsibility and ownership for their own development – and I can offer advice and support here too, both before and after the “formal” training. Our experts need to be present in the training and they need to actively look to use what they have learned and practiced after the training too. And again, this is where their manager plays an important role.

Who is the secret L&D manager?

The “secret L&D manager” is actually a group of L&D managers. They are real people who would prefer not to mention their name or company – but do want to write anonymously so they can openly and directly share their ideas and experience with peers.

You can meet more of our secret L&D managers here …

And if you’d like to share your thoughts and experiences without sharing your name or company then please get in touch.